Month: July 2019

first_img By Toni Gibbons TAYLOR– In an effort to curtail smoking on property owned by the Town of Taylor, the Town Council considered a new ordinance at their Aug. 2 meeting. “The Smoke Free Arizona ActSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Photo by Toni GibbonsAt the Taylor Town Council meeting on Aug. 2, resident Steve Foster, addressed the council regarding recent Arizona Public Service power outages in the community that created a hardship not just to him, but also to other elderly citizens who live in the area. August 7, 2018center_img Taylor Council considers non-smoking ordinancelast_img read more

first_img With Iran deal teetering on brink, Europeans assess next steps Related News UK says seized Iranian oil tanker could be released Advertising US allegations over tanker attacks part of 'sabotage diplomacy', says Iran An oil tanker is seen after it was attacked at the Gulf of Oman, June 13, 2019. (ISNA/Handout via Reuters)Iran’s foreign minister said on Friday that the US allegations against Iran over the Gulf of Oman tanker attacks were part of “sabotage diplomacy” adopted by a so-called B Team, which he has said includes US national security adviser John Bolton. Hassan Rouhani says Iran ready to talk to US if sanctions lifted “That the US immediately jumped to make allegations against Iran—w/o a shred of factual or circumstantial evidence—only makes it abundantly clear that the #B_Team is moving to a #PlanB: Sabotage diplomacy—including by @AbeShinzo—and cover up its #EconomicTerrorism against Iran,” Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted.Also read | US blames Iran for tanker attacks in Gulf of OmanZarif has repeatedly said that Bolton, an ardent Iran hawk, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman could goad US President Donald Trump into a conflict with Tehran. By Reuters |Dubai | Updated: June 14, 2019 9:16:26 am Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img Email By Robert F. ServiceJan. 9, 2019 , 1:00 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe For patients with aggressive kidney and skin cancers, an immune-boosting protein called interleukin-2 (IL-2) can be a lifesaver. But the dose at which it fights cancer can also produce life-threatening side effects. Now, scientists have used computer modeling to design a new protein from scratch that mimics IL-2’s immune-enhancing abilities, while avoiding its dangerous side effects. The protein has so far been tested only in animals, but it may soon enter human trials.IL-2 plays a key role in directing the body’s immune response to outside invaders. The protein, a signaling molecule called a cytokine, ramps up the activity of white blood cells known as T lymphocytes by binding simultaneously to their IL-2β and IL-2γ receptors. In cells where a third type of receptor, IL-2α, is present, IL-2 binds collectively to all three. In other white blood cells, this dampens the body’s immune response. But it can also occur in cells in blood vessels, causing those vessels to leak, a potentially deadly condition.“People have tried for 30 years to alter IL-2 to make it safer and more effective,” says Daniel Adriano Silva Manzano, a biochemist at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle and first author of the new study. But IL-2 is unstable and stops working when it loses its normal 3D shape, and many mutations destabilize the structure further, Silva Manzano says. When a designer protein (red) binds to immune cell receptors (gray and purple), it ramps up immune activity that kills cancer cells. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Researchers redesign a cancer-busting protein—without the side effects Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Ian Haydon/Institute for Protein Design To do better, Silva Manzano teamed up with lab director David Baker, a protein designer at UW, and colleagues in the United States, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom, to remake IL-2 from scratch. They started by studying atomic maps of IL-2 interacting with the desirable β and γ receptors, as well as the undesirable α receptor. IL-2 is a single long chain of amino acids. When it folds up into its active 3D shape, it forms four segments that twist into spirals called alpha helixes that are held together by a series of loops that tie them together in a bundle. At the bottom of this bundle of helixes are two sites that bind to the β and γ receptors. Meanwhile, portions of one of the helixes and two loops at the top of the protein bind to α receptors.Baker, Silva, and their colleagues programmed protein-design software Baker had developed, called Rosetta, to maintain the needed interactions with the β and γ receptors but eliminate the portion that binds to α receptors. Rosetta produced 40 options. After analyzing them, the team synthesized and tested 22, tweaking the best to improve the designer protein’s stability and its effectiveness at binding the desired receptors.Finally, the researchers settled on a version they dubbed Neo-2/15, which shares only 14% of its amino acid sequence with IL-2. Lab studies revealed it bound tightly to β and γ receptors, but not to α receptors. In mouse models of colon cancer and melanoma, the compound reduced side effects associated with α receptors, strongly inhibited tumor growth, and even eliminated tumors in a handful of animals. Regular IL-2 given to other mice didn’t do the latter, they report today in Nature.“The approach they took was brilliant,” says James Olson, a clinical oncologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle who was not affiliated with the work. If it reduces dangerous side effects in people, Neo-2/15 could let doctors give patients more treatment, and for longer periods, to help the immune system wipe out cancer, Olson says. It may also prove valuable in combination with approved immunotherapy drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, which block tumors from hiding from immune sentries, he says.UW has licensed Neo-2/15 to a Seattle startup called Neoleukin Therapeutics that is working to bring it to clinical trials. Researchers at the company are exploring how antibodies might target the protein at tumors rather than normal cells, so as not to spark an autoimmune response, says Silva Manzano, who plans to join the company as head of research. Baker adds that a similar approach of selectively seeking out certain receptors could prove useful in ramping up immune responses against other types of cancers, as well as in dampening immune responses to autoimmune diseases. Olson agrees. “This is just the first shot across the bow,” he says.last_img read more

first_imgJoshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory The app on your phone tells you the weather for the next 10 days—that’s the furthest forecasters have ever been able to predict. In fact, every decade for the past hundred years, a day has been added to the total forecast length. But we may be approaching a limit—thanks to chaos inherent in the atmosphere. Staff writer Paul Voosen joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how researchers have determined that we will only be adding about 5 more days to our weather prediction apps.Also this week, host Meagan Cantwell interviews Trygve Fossum from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim about his article in Science Robotics on an underwater autonomous vehicle designed to sample phytoplankton off the coast of Norway. The device will help researchers form a better picture of the base of many food webs and with continued monitoring, researchers hope to better understand key processes in the ocean such as nutrient, carbon, and energy cycling.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcastsAbout the Science Podcast[Image: Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

first_img A study published today offers some of the best evidence yet that humans, like many other creatures, can sense Earth’s magnetic field. But it doesn’t settle other questions that have swirled around this contentious idea for decades: If we do have a subconscious magnetic sense, does it affect our behavior? And does it arise from an iron mineral found in our brains, as the authors believe?“I think this paper will make quite a splash,” says Peter Hore, a physical chemist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. But, he adds, “Independent replication is crucial.”A variety of species—bacteria, snails, frogs, lobsters—seem to detect Earth’s magnetic field, and some animals, such as migratory birds, rely on it for navigation. But testing for the sense in humans has been tricky. Experiments in the 1970s that asked blindfolded participants to point in a cardinal direction after being spun around or led far from home yielded inconsistent results. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Spencer Lowell Biophysicist Joe Kirschvink at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena is a veteran of the search. Using electroencephalography (EEG), his team recorded brain activity from electrodes on the scalp to search for some response to changes in a highly controlled magnetic field equal in strength to Earth’s.In the experiment, each of the 34 participants sat quietly in a dark aluminum box that shielded them from electromagnetic noise such as radio waves. By changing the flow of electric current through coils lining the box, the researchers created a magnetic field that sloped steeply downward, like Earth’s own field at the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Then they rotated the field, as would happen if a person turned their head.In an EEG study with a different design, published in 2002, other researchers failed to find any brain response to a changing field. Kirschvink says data analysis techniques used at the time were not powerful enough to detect an effect. The new study, published in eNeuro, found that the rotating field sometimes elicited a marked drop in waves of the α frequency, which are typical of a brain that is awake but at rest. Many EEG studies use α to track responses to visual information, says Mary MacLean, a neuroscientist at the University of California (UC), Santa Barbara, who was not involved in the work. A change in α, she says, “is generally a good indicator of the degree to which people are engaging in sensory processing.”The effect showed up in less than a third of participants, which could indicate that genetic factors or past experiences influence a person’s sensitivity to a magnetic field, says cognitive neuroscientist Shinsuke Shimojo, another member of the Caltech team. Mysteriously, the change registered only when the field was rotated counterclockwise.“What they show is very exciting and seems robust,” says Stuart Gilder, a geophysicist at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany. But the results call for follow-up tests, such as measuring how different field strengths and rotation speeds affect brain activity, he adds.“I’m not surprised there’s an effect,” says Margaret Ahmad, a biologist at Sorbonne University in Paris, who notes that magnetic fields are known to affect human and other mammalian cells in a dish. “There’s something in a cell that is different in the presence of a magnetic field,” she says. “We see this effect in human embryonic kidney cells; you’re not going to convince me that an effect in brain cells is of any greater or lesser significance.”The Caltech team is still far from explaining how magnetoreception is possible, scientists say. “I’m convinced that something in the brain is responding to a magnetic field in a particular way,” Maclean says. “I just have no idea … what mechanism that really represents.”The mechanism of magnetoreception is only settled for certain bacteria, which harbor magnetite crystals that align with Earth’s magnetic field. Bird beaks and fish snouts also contain magnetite, as does the human brain. Gilder and his colleagues recently found that it is most concentrated in lower, evolutionarily ancient regions—the brain stem and cerebellum. But no one has identified the proposed sensory cells that contain magnetite.Other groups suggest a protein in the retina called cryptochrome, which senses incoming light, also responds to magnetic fields. But Kirschvink’s team contends its new results tip the scales in favor of magnetite. When they reversed their magnetic field to point upward, its rotations no longer elicited a change in brain activity. Magnetite, like a compass needle, responds to a field’s direction, whereas cryptochrome would respond identically to fields with opposite polarity.“If the results are real, I think that rules out cryptochrome as the source of these effects in humans,” Hore says, though it might play a role in other animals.But is a change in brain waves alone evidence of a “sense”? Some aren’t convinced. “If I were to … stick my head in a microwave and switch it on, I would see effects on my brain waves,” says Thorsten Ritz, a biophysicist at UC Irvine. “That doesn’t mean we have a microwave sense.”More convincing would be evidence that the brain actually processes magnetic information in a way that influences behavior, Ritz says. He is intrigued by a study from a South Korean research team, published last month in PLOS ONE, which found that, in the absence of visual or auditory cues, men who had fasted for about 20 hours could sometimes orient themselves in a direction they previously associated with food.Kirschvink’s team has experiments in progress that aim to unearth subtle consequences of a magnetic sense—for example, manipulating the magnetic field to bias a person’s best guess at a cardinal direction. “That would really supersolidly establish that humans have a full-fledged magnetosensory system,” says Caltech neuroscience graduate student Connie Wang, who is first author on the new paper. The team also wants to test whether careful training could bring magnetic sensations into consciousness.If humans really use a magnetite-based sensor, there are other concerns to explore, Kirschvink says, such as whether the magnets in aviation headsets could impair pilots’ sense of direction, and whether the strong magnetic field generated by MRI machines could somehow alter our magnetite.Three years ago, Kirschvink gave a preview of these results at a meeting of the United Kingdom’s Royal Institute of Navigation, which meets every 3 years in Egham. On 12 April, at the society’s next meeting, he’ll take the stage to defend his ideas to an audience of skeptics, with data in hand. “We’re going to have a fun session,” he says. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Kelly ServickMar. 18, 2019 , 1:00 PMcenter_img Humans—like other animals—may sense Earth’s magnetic field Biophysicist Joe Kirschvink and his team used brain recordings to search for a magnetic sixth sense in people. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emaillast_img read more

first_imgThese insights have the potential to make a big difference to how we treat sexual disorders in male babies in future – and are also relevant to the whole debate about male and female identity.Paul Fowler, Study Author. Source:Fowler, P. Move over testosterone, another hormone is also vital for making boys – and it doesn’t come from the testes. The Conversation. By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Feb 15 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)A new study has revealed that testosterone, which is produced and released by the testes, is not the only hormone involved in fetal development of the male penis. It is now thought that the masculinization process also involves a hormone called androsterone, which originates in other tissues, including the placenta.Sebastian Kaulitzki | ShutterstockThe results not only shed light on a previously unknown “backdoor” pathway of masculinization, but could also explain the link between placental dysfunction and disorders of male genital development.center_img During male fetal development, testosterone from the testes is converted into the male sex hormone 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by the genital tubercle – the primordial structure that either develops into a penis or clitoris.In one in a few thousand cases, babies are born with “ambiguous” genitalia, where their gender is not quite clear. Previously, the understanding was that this is caused by problems associated with testosterone.However, recent studies have shown that penis development also relies on a second, alternative or “backdoor” pathway, where DHT is produced independently of testosterone from the testicles. However, the details of this other pathway remained unclear, including the source DHT.As reported in the journal PLOS Biology, Fowler and collaborators in Glasgow, France and Sweden have conducted a study that explains more about this second process.Using mass spectrometry, the team measured levels of steroid hormones in fetal plasma and tissue during the second trimester – the most vital phase for penis development. The researchers also measured gene expression in tissues known to be involved in hormone synthesis.The study revealed that the hormone androsterone, which can also be converted to DHT, was the main steroid hormone present in the blood of the male fetus and that both androsterone and testosterone were present at lower levels in the female circulation.In addition, the enzymes required to convert androsterone to DHT were mainly present in non-gonadal tissues including the placenta and the liver.Given that androsterone can be made from progesterone, Fowler and colleagues suggest that placental progesterone is the androsterone source in the alternative pathway.Our results demonstrate that masculinization of the male fetus depends not only on the testes, but also on other tissues, especially the placenta. They also suggest an explanation for why disorders of placental insufficiency can lead to hypospadias and other abnormalities of growth of the male external genitalia.”last_img read more

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 15 2019Results from a large clinical trial indicate that patients with rheumatoid arthritis are likely to experience the same level of cardiovascular benefits from statins as other individuals, without additional risks. The findings appear in Arthritis & Rheumatology, an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology.Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an approximately 50 percent higher risk of experiencing cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke compared with the general population. By lowering LDL cholesterol, statins are known to help prevent cardiovascular events in certain high-risk individuals, but it’s unclear whether they are safe and effective for patients with inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the potential risks and benefits of statins in moderate risk patients with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers designed the Trial of Atorvastatin for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (TRACE RA), a multi-center, randomized, double-blind trial comparing the statin atorvastatin with placebo.The trial included 3,002 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were over aged 50 years or had rheumatoid arthritis for more than 10 years, without clinical atherosclerosis, diabetes, or myopathy. Patients were randomized to receive atorvastatin 40mg daily or placebo.During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, 1.6 percent of patients who received atorvastatin and 2.4 percent of patients receiving placebo experienced cardiovascular death, heart attack, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or any arterial revascularization. After adjustments, there was a 40 percent lower risk of cardiovascular events for patients taking atorvastatin, although the difference was not statistically significant. This was because the overall rate of events was low.Related StoriesResearchers identify new clues on tissue damage in rheumatoid arthritis and lupusFirst safe, reliable, noninvasive way to monitor rheumatoid arthritisResearchers develop NO-scavenging hydrogel for treatment of rheumatoid arthritisAt the end of the trial, patients taking atorvastatin had significantly lower LDL cholesterol as well as significantly lower levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, compared with patients taking placebo. Adverse events in the atorvastatin and placebo groups were similar.The paper’s lead author is Professor George Kitas of Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, while co-senior authors are Professor Jill Belch of the University of Dundee and Professor Deborah Symmons of the University of Manchester.”The trial found that the statin reduced levels of cholesterol by similar amounts as has been seen in other populations studied. The results also show that it is as safe for patients with rheumatoid arthritis to take statins as for the general population,” said Prof. Symmons. “In addition, because of the low overall rate of cardiovascular events in the trial population, there is no indication for all patients with rheumatoid arthritis to be prescribed a statin. This is unlike diabetes where the great majority of patients are recommended to take a statin.”The study authors recommend that patients with rheumatoid arthritis be prescribed statins according to national or local guidelines for managing cardiovascular risk in the general population.An accompanying editorial notes that the study provides information that will be useful for researchers and clinicians who focus on rheumatoid arthritis, and the results may be helpful when considering cardiovascular risk across other rheumatic diseases. Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/arthritis-rheumatology/large-clinical-trial-finds-statins-safe-and-likely-effective-prlast_img read more

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 2 2019Children with depression admitted to the hospital for other illnesses like pneumonia, appendicitis or seizure disorders, stay longer, pay more and are at greater risk of death, a Rutgers New Jersey Medical School study finds.The study, which appears in the Journal of Affective Disorders, may be the first to look specifically at children diagnosed with depression and another illness, how the care is being provided and coordinated, and the number of children who die while hospitalized.”Depression is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States, with one in five children reporting episodes of major depression before the age of 18,” said Mayowa Olusunmade, lead author and a psychiatry resident at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. “While many studies have recognized the impact of mental health conditions, little is known about the impact of depression, specifically, on hospital utilization and cost. Even more, we discovered there is little research on how much it actually costs to implement prevention strategies.”Related StoriesStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careThe researchers found that depressed children had fewer procedures when admitted for non-mental health reasons. Researchers are not sure exactly why this occurs but Olusunmade said it may be because depressed patients are less willing to undergo procedures or that the providers attributed the health-related symptoms to the depression and were less likely to perform diagnostic procedure they thought were unnecessary.The findings suggest that routine screening, improved mental health programs, early diagnosis and prompt referral or treatment of depression in hospitalized children could be beneficial. These could also reduce the burden on hospital resources.”From a practical point of view, health care providers should expect better outcomes if they screen more aggressively for depression, detect depression earlier in their patients and manage it appropriately in affected children,” said Olusunmade.The study used data from the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) for 2012, a nationally representative database of all inpatient admissions in the United States for patients younger than 21. The database used a nationwide sample of all pediatric admissions, using about 670,000 discharges from the database.The children were aged 6-20 years old. A disproportionate number of the children were older teens, with the average age being about 17 years old. This is likely because depression is more difficult to diagnose/detect in younger children, Olusunmade said.Source: http://www.rutgers.edu/last_img read more

first_img © 2018 AFP Facebook said Tuesday it was easing a ban on ads for cryptocurrencies while keeping a prohibition on initial coin offerings to raise assets. Explore further The move comes five months after the leading social network said it was banning all ads related to cryptocurrencies like bitcoin as a way to curb scams.To place ads on Facebook for cryptocurrencies, companies will need to be pre-approved and offer proof they have licenses or are traded on a public exchange, the company said.”Given these restrictions, not everyone who wants to advertise will be able to do so,” Facebook product management director Rob Leathern said in a statement.”But we’ll listen to feedback, look at how well this policy works and continue to study this technology so that, if necessary, we can revise it over time.Facebook and other online platforms began cracking down on ads for crypto-related businesses amid concerns over fraud in the burgeoning and largely unregulated sector where currencies can see huge swings.Fraud is common in the world of red-hot digital currencies such as bitcoin.Earlier this year, the US Securities and Exchange Commission shut down an initial coin offering by a Texas company called AriseBank.AriseBank was accused of relying on celebrity endorsers such as boxer Evander Holyfield and social media to cheat investors out of $600 million of its goal of $1 billion for a currency it called “AriseCoin.”Initial coin offerings—used by some startups to raise billions of dollars—still won’t be able to advertise on Facebook.Twitter, Google and Snapchat have announced similar bans.The British government early this year called for global regulation of controversial virtual currencies like bitcoin.Bitcoin and similar forms of virtual cash are independent of governments and banks and use blockchain technology, where encrypted digital coins are created by supercomputers.The virtual currency is not regulated by any central bank but is instead overseen by a community of users who try to guard against counterfeiting. Citation: Facebook eases ban on cryptocurrency ads (2018, June 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-facebook-eases-cryptocurrency-ads.html Facebook bans ads for cryptocurrencies This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img Well-considered investments in digital technology can be transformational for health and education services across the developing world, but too often they fail to deliver impact at scale, according to research released today by the Oxford University-based Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development.Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Pathways Commission, said: “Better health and education for young people—the twin engines of what economists call “human capital”—could drive the next phase of economic progress in developing countries, but only if governments design policies to ensure technology reaches the most marginalized communities.”The commission’s new report, Positive disruption: health and education in a digital age, has found that silver bullet initiatives, focusing only on technological hardware, such as introducing laptops in classrooms, are often not effective beyond the initial pilot. This is usually due to policy makers adopting a piecemeal approach, which fails to consider the wider system in which the technology is being used.However, the research finds that by looking at entire health and education systems, and deploying technology at strategic points, countries can provide health and education that works for all.Professor Stefan Dercon, academic director of the Pathways Commission at the University of Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government, said: “Done right, digital investments can take advantage of technology’s massive potential, but failing to harness these opportunities risks further excluding the poorest. Directing funds towards technologically-enhanced health and education systems and the right digital connectivity can unlock benefits that could be transformational for the way clinics and classrooms operate in the future.” New report offers a blueprint for prudent investments in technology, through which governments can create effective and fair health and education services. A third of people in Wales use digital technology to self-diagnose Explore further Technology can transform global health and education systems, but it is no silver bullet – Oxford report. Credit: Shutterstock The report highlights evidence from around the world where well-judged investments in technology are transforming health and education outcomes:In Mali, a non-governmental organization called Muso contributed to a ten-fold decline in child mortality—by enabling health workers to proactively seek patients and deliver free care door-to-door. Since Muso deployed digitally enabled devices and a data dashboard, providing individual feedback on health-worker efficiency, it has seen a 10 percent increase in the number of houses visited per month.In Uganda, the web-based application Mobile VRS has helped increase birth registration rates from 28 percent to 70 percent across the country, enabling decision makers to track health outcomes and improve access to services for these children.In Kenya, school children’s academic performance is lagging more than two years behind their actual grade. But, Tusome, a digitally-enabled literacy programme introduced by the Kenyan Ministry of Education, is now boosting outcomes, such that, if scaled, the country’s learning gap could be closed. This initiative includes digitized teaching materials and teacher feedback mechanisms.Professor Dercon said: “On average, children across sub-Saharan Africa spend approximately eight and a half years in the classroom but only effectively receive around four and a half years of learning. If Tusome’s success in promoting literacy in Kenya were scaled up across the continent, it could mean that millions of children are no longer left behind. When technology is deployed thoughtfully and judicially, positive disruption on a large scale is entirely possible.”The Pathways Commission report offers four core principles to ensure funders and policymakers avoid the pitfalls of inappropriate adoption and poor implementation of technology and chose solutions that will offer better health and education for all:Deploy technology only when it is the best solution for a specific, identified problem and when it will work within local political and cultural contextsFocus on hardware which provides the content, data and connections needed by end users. Hardware for hardware’s sake is not a route to success. Don’t harvest data without an end goal in mind. Instead, invest in frameworks which organize data so it can be used to inform decision-making, fuel positive feedback loops and enable personalized servicesEnsure the technology genuinely works for all by making deliberate efforts to tailor interventions to address the needs of those who the system is currently failing.If technology is deployed strategically, the Commission concludes that there are 5 digitally-enhanced future visions which are realistically achievable for developing countries—where inequalities in health and education are minimized:Personalised learning and healthcare, which can be tailored towards the poorest and those left furthest behindProactive, inclusive systems which bring technological resources to those that need them mostHealthcare and education expertise being brought to remote areas via phones, video-link and virtual realityTeacher and healthcare roles redefined and enhanced by digital technologies, AI and automation of administrative tasksHealth and education services continuously learning and improving via data-led feedback loops for decision-makers at every level.center_img More information: Positive disruption: health and education in a digital age: pathwayscommission.bsg.ox.ac.u … /positive-disruption This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Technology can transform global health and education, but it’s no silver bullet (2019, May 30) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-technology-global-health-silver-bullet.html Provided by University of Oxfordlast_img read more

first_imgRats! They eat our food, chew through our property and spread all sorts of nasty diseases. And they are gross (right?), with those naked tails and quick, unpredictable movements. Rats invade our homes — our castles! — the one place where we should be safe and in control. Over the millennia that we have lived with them, rats have proven themselves virtually impossible to expunge. They are so adaptable that they can exploit and infest virtually every corner of our cities. They avoid traps and poisons and reproduce at such a staggering rate that extermination attempts usually end up being a game of whack-a-mole… or, rather, whack-a-rat. Is it any wonder that many cities seem to be plagued by rats? Or do the cities themselves bear some responsibility for their rat problems? This is what I have been exploring over the past 10 years as a wildlife and public health researcher with the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative and the University of British Columbia.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65936-new-york-city-rats-and-humans.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Challenges of managing urban rodents For the most part, when it comes to dealing with rats, cities have it all wrong. For example, rat-related issues are addressed using a hodgepodge of unrelated policy and programming. At best, municipal leadership is highly fragmented; at worst, it’s absent altogether. Municipal governments may address rat infestations that occur on public properties or in buildings scheduled for demolition. Local health authorities may address infestations in food establishments or where there is a demonstrated health risk. For the most part, people are left to fend for themselves. Another problem is that we know very little about urban rats. There is simply not enough information about them to answer even the most basic questions like: How many rats are there? Where do they live? Why are they there? Is the problem getting worse? Despite this lack of knowledge, cities are often willing to invest tremendous amounts of time and resources into pest control interventions, such as New York City’s $32 million “war on rats.” It means that cities have no metric to determine the return on their investments, because without knowing what the rat problem looked like beforehand, there is no way of knowing whether an intervention made the problem any better. The cohabiting solution The key to solving this problem may lie in simply changing our perspective. Rather than viewing the city as a place entirely under human control that’s being invaded by rats, we need to recognize that the city is an ecosystem and that rats live here too. This does not mean that we should love rats, nor does it mean that we need to leave them alone. Rather, it shifts the focus to managing the ecosystem of which rats are a part, rather than focusing on the rats themselves. Once we recognize that we are managing a system, it becomes clear that leadership and strategic planning are critical. The very concept of a system is that the whole is more than the sum of its parts; this is the antithesis of the reductionist approach that we’re accustomed to that deals with infestations on a case-by-case basis. Instead, we need to understand the urban ecosystem, just like we would if we were trying to manage polar bear populations in the Arctic or elephant populations on the savanna. This means substantive, long-term investments in collecting data on rat populations and the specific conditions that support them, as well as the impact of any implemented interventions. It also means understanding the interface between rats and humans. For the majority of urban centres, rats pose a relatively minor threat to people. The threats are certainly not in proportion to the amount of negative attention rats receive. This means we need to understand why we find rats so disturbing, and what can be done to reduce that fear. Urban ecologies An ecosystem lens also directs us to look at areas of vulnerability and resilience within the system. When it comes to rats, our homes are the most obvious place of vulnerability, where the relationship between rats and people is least acceptable. However, private residences are often the areas most ignored by municipal powers. Also, rats and rat-related issues disproportionately affect impoverished, inner-city neighbourhoods, and residents of these neighbourhoods are particularly vulnerable to the physical and mental health impacts of living with rats. By identifying and focusing on these highly vulnerable scenarios, cities can start to make meaningful changes in how we perceive and deal with rats. This is not to say the rest of the urban landscape should be ignored. Rather, the identification of particular areas of vulnerability needs to take place within a larger framework that uses ecosystem-based principles to address rats specifically. Examples include changing the way that garbage cans are designed and enacting tougher bylaws that enshrine the right to live in a healthy and rat-free environment. These sorts of policies and programs that increase the resilience of the system have the potential to curtail the physical and psychological damage done by rats. The result is that co-existence with rats will come to seem no more unthinkable than our co-existence with, for instance, squirrels. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoUltimate Pet Nutrition SupplementsAging Cat? Help Them Thrive By Doing This One ThingUltimate Pet Nutrition SupplementsUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo Chelsea Himsworth, Regional Director for the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, University of British Columbialast_img read more

first_img The 25 Most Mysterious Archaeological Finds on Earth Photos: Viking Warrior Is Actually a Woman 30 of the World’s Most Valuable Treasures That Are Still Missing The discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America. The researchers also found evidence the Vikings occupied this outpost for more than a century, way longer than previously believed. Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L’Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period. The new research, published today (July 15) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that the Vikings lived there possibly into the 12th or even the 13th century. [In Photos: Viking Outposts Possibly Found in Canada]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65940-were-vikings-smoking-pot-in-newfoundland.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Bog finds In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of “ecofacts” — environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans — that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland — Simplocaria metallica, from Greenland, and Acidota quadrata, from the Arctic. The layer also held pollen from Juglans (walnuts) and from Humulus (cannabis), two species that don’t naturally grow at L’Anse aux Meadows; rather, the Vikings could have picked up all of these plant and animal species when they sailed south. [Photos: 10th-Century Viking Tomb Unearthed in Denmark] They also found the remains of dung from grazing caribou, as well as remains of wood and charcoal. The layer from the peat bog is similar to other “cultural layers from across the Norse North Atlantic,” the archaeological team wrote in the journal article. More evidence Additionally, the archaeologists performed Bayesian analysis — a type of statistical analysis — on radiocarbon dates from artifacts previously excavated at L’Anse aux Meadows. That analysis also suggested Viking occupation for up to 200 years. “This does not imply a continuous occupation,” the researchers wrote, noting that the Vikings could have abandoned and reoccupied L’Anse aux Meadows when it suited them. Did the Vikings use pot in Newfoundland? The finding of cannabis pollen raises the question of whether the Vikings used cannabis for making clothes or for medicinal-recreational purposes while they explored North America. Paul Ledger, the lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at Memorial University of Newfoundland urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. Ledger urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. It’s also possible that some of the other “ecofacts” were brought to the peat bog by indigenous peoples who lived in Newfoundland, and not by the Vikings. [Fierce Fighters: 7 Secrets of Viking Seamen] Ultimately, “the results presented here [in the journal article] pose more questions than answers,” the archaeological team wrote. Reaction from other Viking researchers Viking researchers not affiliated with the research team urged caution about the results. “I think it is too early to draw any conclusions,” said Birgitta Wallace, a senior archaeologist emerita with Parks Canada who has done extensive research on the Vikings in North America. Wallace told Live Science that she isn’t convinced that the Vikings left behind these ecofacts. “I think it is highly unlikely that the Norse [another word for Vikings] would have returned in the 12th and 13th centuries, as there are no structures on the site from that period that could be Norse,” Wallace said. “We do know that there were indigenous people, ancestors of the Beothuk, on the site at that time.” Patricia Sutherland, a visiting scientist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who has also done extensive research on the Vikings in North America, said that while the Vikings could have been in Newfoundland during the 12th or 13th centuries, it is too early to say for sure. “It seems premature to suggest such a scenario on the basis of the ‘ecofacts’ listed in the paper,” Sutherland said. It’s possible that some of the beetles and plant pollen found in the layer were brought to L’Anse aux Meadows by the Vikings around A.D. 1000, and they continued to flourish after the Vikings left, Sutherland said. The research team plans to continue their work at L’Anse aux Meadows in August, Ledger said. Editor’s note: This article was updated to fix a statement about the interpretation of the cannabis pollen. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndolast_img read more

first_img  National Mineral Development Corporation (NMDC) has got a 20-year extension on its lease agreement of Donimalai mines from the Karnataka State government.In a release, NMDC said the lease deed of Donimalai iron ore mine has expired on November 3. The Karnataka government extended it from November 4 for two decades. The other formalities are in the process.The NMDC has done extensive exploration and developing iron ore mines in Karnataka which includes Kudremukh, Donimalai, Bagabudan, Kumaraswamy and Ramanadurg during the past three decades. The Donimalai mine is being developed to export ore to Japan and South Korea. COMMENT NMDC Ltd COMMENTS November 08, 2018 Karnatakacenter_img mining and quarrying SHARE SHARE EMAIL SHARE Published onlast_img read more

first_imgpolitics COMMENTS SHARE SHARE EMAIL November 28, 2018 SHARE COMMENT The Congress said on Wednesday the GDP back series data released by Niti Ayog reflected the “desperate attempt of a defeatist” Narendra Modi government to undermine India’s growth story over the last 15 years. “The Modi goverment and its puppet Niti Aayog want the people to believe that 2+2= 8! Such is the gimmickry, jugglery, trickery and chicanery being sold as back series data,” said party’s media-in-charge Randeep Singh Surjewala.Since the advent of the BJP-led NDA government in May 2014, there has been a determined effort to run down the record of the two UPA governments under Manmohan Singh, he said. “A lot of confusion was sown and the Modi government added to the confusion by changing the base year from 2004-05 to 2011-12.”.“The Congress party had repeatedly pointed out that when the base year is changed, the government should follow the healthy international practice and revise the numbers for the previous years. We had demanded that the back series data of GVA and GDP should be calculated and released so that meaningful comparisons can be made,” he added.Surjewala claimed that UPA-I and UPA-II delivered the highest decadal growth (8.13 per cent at factor cost) since Independence. “It is also a matter of record that during this period, 140 million people were lifted out of poverty,” he said. “Infact, under the Modi govt, there has been complete stagnation in investment. The peak Gross Fixed Capital Formation as a per cent of GDP was 34.3 per cent in 2011-12. Even in 2013-14, it was 31.3 per cent. However, in the last three years, it has remained constant at 28.5 per cent. At that level of investment (GFCF), it is not possible to achieve higher growth rates,” he added. Published on Congress media-in-charge Randeep Singh Surjewalalast_img read more

first_img Golf 07 Jul 2019 American Daly not allowed to use golf cart at British Open Golf 11 May 2019 Woods, Koepka, Molinari to tee off early in first round at PGA Northern Irishman Rory McIlroy and American Justin Thomas carded 67, while former champion Rickie Fowler was among just a handful of players to struggle, shooting 71. (Reporting by Andrew Both in Cary, North Carolina, editing by Ed Osmond) (Reuters) – Edoardo Molinari was among many to take advantage of ideal conditions at the Scottish Open on Thursday, vaulting into a four-way share of the first-round lead in North Berwick.Edoardo, older brother of reigning British Open champion Francesco, carded eight-under-par 63, a score matched by fellow Italian Nino Bertasio, American Matt Kuchar and France’s Romain Wattel at the Renaissance Club.While Francesco is having a week off to prepare for next week’s Open at Royal Portrush, Edoardo is attempting to qualify as one of the top three finishers this week not also already exempt.Soft conditions and little breeze left the course at the mercy of the field on a day when more than half the players broke 70. Related Newscenter_img Related News Golf 11 Jul 2019 Golf – Social media critics no problem but not granny, says Kuchar {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more

first_img Tags / Keywords: Markets 27 Jun 2019 Trade-war winner Vietnam is now a target for Trump’s tariffs Related News Vietnam goes from trade war winner to Trump target. Economy Nation 08 Jul 2019 US not being clear of its priority targets in trade war with China Nation 10 Jul 2019 Malaysia has potential to profit from US-China trade war, says Azmin Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} For manufacturers like IREX, Trump’s recent action means they can’t sit back either.”Our sales department is looking for new markets, so if the U.S. increases Vietnam tariffs it won’t impact IREX’s business much,” said Trang, the company’s COO.- Bloomberg HANOI: Americans are buying solar panels from Vietnam like never before, but local manufacturer IREX Energy JSC isn’t celebrating.After U.S. President Donald Trump slapped higher tariffs on China, production in neighbouring Vietnam went into overdrive. Chinese manufacturers, who face a 55% U.S. tariff on their goods, relocated some production to Vietnam, while local businesses saw a jump in orders. In June alone, U.S. imports of solar cells from Vietnam surged 656% from a year ago.That trade boom in everything from Ikea furniture to Nike Inc. shoes is now prompting more scrutiny from the US and making businesses like IREX concerned.”We are worried that the US may raise tariffs on our solar panels,” Pham Thi Thu Trang, the company’s chief operating officer, said from Ho Chi Minh City. “Though the U.S market is huge, it is a complicated market when it comes to its politics.”Communist Party-led Vietnam has steadily opened up to foreign investors over the years to become a manufacturing hub in the region, with household names like Samsung Electronics Co., Intel Corp. and Nestle SA setting up factories there. It’s that trade openness, as well as its low-cost labor and proximity to China, that’s helped Vietnam successfully navigate growing global protectionism as companies seek out refuges from the trade war.It’s very quickly climbed the ranks to become a significant U.S. trade partner. Vietnam’s annual trade surplus with the U.S. has exceeded $20 billion since 2014 and reached $40 billion last year, the highest in records going back to 1990, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. For the first five months of the year, the surplus is already 43% higher than a year ago at $21.6 billion.The Trump administration is now pressuring the nation of 97 million people to slash its trade surplus, threatening one of the world’s fastest-growing economies.Trouble began in May, when the U.S. Treasury added Vietnam to a watchlist of countries being monitored for possible currency manipulation. Then, in response to U.S. pressure, Vietnam announced a crackdown on Chinese exporters rerouting products through the Southeast Asian nation with fake Made-in-Vietnam labels to bypass Trump’s tariffs.Trump described Vietnam last month as “almost the single-worst abuser of everybody” when asked if he wanted to impose tariffs on the nation. And just last week, the U.S. slapped duties of more than 400% on steel imports from Vietnam which originated in South Korea and Taiwan.Vietnam officials have been left reeling. The government says it’s committed to buying more U.S. goods, from Boeing Co. jets to energy products to help narrow its trade surplus with the world’s largest economy. Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc last week told officials to monitor U.S. reactions to the nation’s monetary policy more closely.”They are very nervous and confused. They don’t know what Trump’s next move will be,” said Alexander Vuving, a professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Hawaii.Vietnam has not been adept at responding to charges against its trading practices in Washington, where a cadre of lawyers are needed to quickly engage the government, said Nestor Scherbey, a licensed U.S. customs broker and consultant based in Ho Chi Minh City. “It’s like being charged in court and not showing up.”Cheap LabourCapital Economics Ltd. estimates that if Trump levied a 25% tariff on imports from Vietnam as he did with Chinese goods, Hanoi would see a 25% drop in export revenue, equivalent to more than 1% of the nation’s gross domestic product. That would erase the estimated 0.5 percentage-point gain it has had over the past year as a beneficiary of the trade war.Even before the trade tensions, Vietnam was benefiting from businesses looking for low-cost alternatives to China as wages there grew. That trend will likely continue, which should help to sustain Vietnam’s economic trajectory, according to Adam McCarty, chief economist with Mekong Economics in Hanoi.”It’s not going to stop the underlying economic motivation to move basic factory work from China to Vietnam,” he said. “China is getting too expensive.”Vietnam’s leaders have also long worked to buffer the country from trade shocks by hedging its reliance on any single market, including the U.S., the nation’s largest export destination. Vietnam has inked more than a dozen free trade agreements such as the just-signed deal with the European Union that will eliminate 99% of customs duties, and the revamped Trans-Pacific Partnership, which eventually provides duty-free access to markets such as Canada and Japan for many products.”Vietnam’s foreign policy for decades has been the opposite of what Groucho Marx said: he’d never want to join a club that would have him,” McCarty said. “The Vietnamese approach is to join every trade and investment club they possibly can.”last_img read more

first_img India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 14:33 IST The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) has issued a warning against websites which are masquerading as passport service providers.The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) has issued a warning about portals that are masquerading as official passport service websites.The ministry’s passport division has warned that such fraudulent passport websites and mobile applications dupe people by collecting data.The fake passport websites also levy additional hefty charges for filling up the online application form and scheduling appointment for passport related services, the alert, which appears as a pop-up on the official website for passport services, says.Citing examples, the alert says that the fake passport websites are registered in the domain name *.org, *.in, *.com.The alert also lists some of the fake websites: www.indiapassport.org, www.online-passportindia.com, www.passportindiaportal.in, www.passport-india.in, www.passport-seva.in, www.applypassport.org.The alert warns everybody looking out for passport services to be careful while booking appointments for getting passports. Those applying for the Indian passport should not visit the aforementioned websites, the alert says.For wondering what, the only official website where one can apply for passport services is: www.passportindia.gov.in.Citizens can also use the official mPassport Seva app that is available on both Android and iOS.Also read | Follow these easy steps to apply for Reissue of Passport Also read | How to apply for passport: Simple stepsFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnumika Bahukhandi Tags :Follow Indian passportFollow PassportFollow MEAFollow Ministry of External AffairsFollow passportindia.gov.in Next Passport alert! Ministry of External Affairs issues warning on fake passport services websitesThe fake passport websites also levy additional hefty charges for filling up the online application form and scheduling appointment for passport related services, the alert, which appears as a pop-up on the official website for passport services, says.advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgFire breaks out at Nandaram market in KolkataThe cause of the fire has not been ascertained yet. An investigation in the case has been initiated.advertisement Next India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 17:03 IST PTI image used for representation.A major fire broke out on Saturday afternoon at Nandaram market in Kolkata in West Bengal. At least six fire tenders are present at the spot and the attempts to douse the fire are underway.The fire was reported from the 9th floor of Nandaram market.The cause of the fire has not been ascertained yet. An investigation in the case has been initiated.The same market was gutted in a major fire nearly a decade ago. It was repaired and the business establishments had resumed work then.More details are awaited in the Nandaram market fire.Also Read | Gurugram: 100 shanties gutted, 7-month-old infant dead in fireAlso Watch | Fire breaks out at high-rise in Kolkata’s Park StreetFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhanlast_img read more