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The 5 Takeaways from the Coyotes introduction of

first_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Arizona Cardinals tight end Rob Housler has had a slow start to the season, missing the first two games due to injury and then being held to two catches in the two games since.Though Housler hasn’t quite made an impact since returning from his preseason ankle injury, head coach Bruce Arians said he’s seen improvement from his tight end in the last few weeks and expects his performance to pick up.“He’s had two really good weeks of practice, he’s full speed,” Arians said. “He just needs to catch the ball better. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Top Stories Comments   Share   center_img Housler has a tough task this Sunday, however, going against Panthers’ linebacker Luke Kuechly. The 2012 NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year has become one of the best inside linebackers in football, and Housler said he’s been preparing for good battle with the second-year player.“He’s the kind of player defensively you’ve got to scheme for,” Housler said. “He’s pretty dynamic in the way he plays, coverage and the run game. As far as tight ends go, he’s got the athleticism and size to run with you and cover you and it’s going to be a challenge this week.”Housler is used to being the one creating the mismatches with his own size and speed, but he acknowledged it will be a team effort getting Kuechly off his game.“If you can run the ball effectively and get him to play the run game and get over the top of him, that’s probably the best way,” Housler said, before adding, “He’s so fast, he’ll probably recover.” Housler, in his third year out of Florida Atlantic, led Arizona tight ends with 45 receptions and 417 yards in 2012. Carolina has allowed just 225.7 yards per game in the air this season, ranking 12th in the NFL. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Virtual pay TV operators in the US are making more

first_imgVirtual pay TV operators in the US are making more than twice the revenue of traditional pay TV operators per channel per month, according to Ampere Analysis.The new research claims there is “more money to go around” in the skinny pay TV bundle than in traditional US pay TV packages, making the switch to ‘virtual’ pay TV potentially lucrative for channels.While the national average revenue per channel per customer for traditional pay TV is US$0.23 a month, virtual pay TV operators make a healthier US$0.59 per channel per month on average, according to the report.Even removing the cost of carrying US national networks, the remaining revenue per channel for skinny bundle packages still stands at US$0.48, “more than double the average for traditional pay TV”, said Ampere’s research.“US pay TV operators have needed to balance carriage fees and revenue for a long time. However, with the increasing migration of pay TV subscribers to OTT services, that balancing act is only set to become more precarious,” said Ampere Analysis research director, Guy Bisson.“Despite the fees they are charged to include US networks in their streaming packages, vMSOs (virtual Multiple Systems Operators) have made a better job of reconciling the carriage fees versus revenues per channel equation.“For channels, the shift to streaming and rise of vMSOs looks like a potentially strong plus – providing they have strong enough brands to make the cut.”last_img read more