Category: onviuzli

first_imgMGN Stock Image.ALBANY – A new bill proposed in Albany aims to expose sexual harassment claims in local governments around the state.Supporters of the legislation say the ‘Sunshine Bill’ would require county legislators, and village or town board members to be notified of an alleged violation within one business day.They say in addition to protecting victims, officials must protect taxpayers from types of behaviors that could lead to litigation against a municipality.Furthermore, the bill allows for personnel situations to be addressed privately in order to protect the victim. The bill also has sponsorship in the Assembly. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016 View Comments Related Shows Hand to God After struggling with low grosses for some time, the devil puppet is departing the Great White Way, although you still have the holiday season to check him out. Hand to God will shutter at the Booth Theatre on January 3, 2016. Directed by Moritz von Stuelpnagel, the new play by Robert Askins began performances on March 12 and officially opened on April 7. At the time of closing, the production will have played 337 performances on Broadway.However, this will not be the end of the road for the production, which is heading for the West End, where it will begin performances on February 5, 2016 at the Vaudeville Theatre. No word yet on casting but von Stuelpnagel will direct.In Hand to God, the good children of Cypress, Texas, are taught to obey the Bible in order to evade Satan’s hand. But when students at the Christian Puppet Ministry put those teachings into practice, one devout young man’s puppet takes on a shocking personality that no one could have expected.The cast includes Steven Boyer, Marc Kudisch, Geneva Carr, Sarah Stiles and Michael Oberholtzer. All five appeared in the original MCC Theater off-Broadway production last year.Broadway.com customers with tickets to canceled performances will be contacted with information on refunds or exchanges.last_img read more

first_imgFemale adventurers fight for equalityHiking makes me feel beautiful, confident, self-reliant and free. So why do I feel the exact opposite as a female athlete and business professional in the outdoor industry?Anna Levesque, a professional paddler and owner of Girls at Play, has also noted the male culture of the outdoor scene. “The outdoor industry has traditionally been male dominated, and that lends itself to a culture in which acting and thinking like a man is the dominant paradigm.”Perhaps this male-dominated paradigm is most evident at Outdoor Retailer, a bi-annual national convention that brings together outdoor companies, media outlets, nonprofits, athletes, and enthusiasts.As an attendee I have memories of wading through the throng of beards, trucker hats, and flannel shirts while scanning the horizon and hoping to find another female athlete. I would love to come across a female buyer who isn’t solely responsible for selecting “cute” lifestyle apparel. And would it be impossible to find one booth where there is actually a female CEO as opposed to the endless number of hostesses who schedule meetings and hand out M&Ms?At the trade show several years ago, I recall rounding a turn to find a group of women—not athletes, buyers, or CEOs—but models clad in bikinis and crampons. As I stood behind a wall of ogling males, I watched the guy in front of me clink his craft brew against his neighbor’s bottle. “This is almost as good as the demonstration with those chicks in two-pieces doing yoga on stand up paddleboards.”I am not a prude or down on the modeling industry; I just would like to see equal standards. “I see women getting recognition because they pose half naked,” says Levesque. “It would be more egalitarian if men were expected to do the same.” Hear that, fellas? Anytime there are bikinis, we expect banana hammocks, too!But the gender discrepancy isn’t just at outdoor conventions. World class climber and instructor Lisa Rands recalls that, for many years, prize money at competitions was not equal for male and female winners. Now, thanks to women like Lisa, equal prize money is the climbing industry standard.But that doesn’t mean that women receive equal treatment. There are far more sponsorship opportunities for men. Anna Levesque says that once she contacted a paddling company about sponsorship, and they said they weren’t taking on anyone new. A week later, her husband got an email from them asking him to be on their team.Sometimes being married to someone in the industry makes the gender difference that much more stark. Anne Lundblad is a runner who competed at an international level while owning a running store in Asheville and raising a daughter. Her husband Mark is also an elite runner.She noted that after races, it’s not uncommon for blogs and magazine features to give the men’s results the headline while women’s results are an afterthought. The industry gender gap became more of a gender chasm once she had a child. “My husband and I were both running and competing, but I was the only one who had to answer work-life balance questions from the media. I’ve also observed moms getting criticized for the adventures they pursued while dads got praised for similar undertakings.”Personally, I’ll never forget the joy of being in the hospital clad in a bare-butt gown and nursing my newborn—when I learned that I’d been dropped by my biggest sponsor. “Really?!” I thought. “You’re telling a physically drained, sleep deprived, hormonally whacked-out woman that she’s been cut? Couldn’t this have waited a week?”Okay, after that rant, it’s important to highlight that none of the women I interviewed came off as indignant or resentful. Anna, Lisa, and Anne all made me see that navigating the outdoor industry is a lot like navigating a river, rock wall, or trail. If there’s an obstacle in your path, it’s up to you to find a way around it. These women haven’t let inequalities prevent them from starting companies or performing at the highest level; instead they’ve gained grace and wisdom by overcoming barriers.The future of the outdoor industry is not going to be found by marketing to the same group of lumbersexual men in mountain towns. It’s going to be found by expanding its reach to women, minorities, and individuals of all body shapes and sizes. Anna, Lisa, and Anne have already found success by doing that, more individuals are signing on, and eventually the industry will catch up with what these talented and intelligent women are doing.“The river is empowering in so many ways. It’s a metaphor for life: Look where you want to go, trust yourself. Do something that scares you, allow yourself to jump and the net will appear and, of course, go with the flow.”—Anna Levesque“Don’t let your frustrations get the best of you. Turn your frustrations into motivation.”—Lisa Rands“When you’re in the woods, you’re not comparing yourself to anyone. You’re not trying to be better, prettier, smarter. It’s just you and the wild and you are learning what makes you, you. And you learn to value your body for what it can do, for its potential, rather than its looks.”—Anne Lundblad “The trail is there for everyone at every phase of life.”—Jennifer Pharr Davislast_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Forget winter—the polar vortex is coming.Temperatures are expected to plunge into the single digits later this week as an arctic blast rumbles toward the Northeast, forecasters say.By Wednesday night Long Islanders should begin to feel the effects of a deep freeze moving across the Midwest as the polar air begins to filter in, Jay Engle, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Upton office, said. The cold surge will mostly be felt Wednesday night through Friday, with the region warming up once the arctic front veers off.“It’s not going to last for a long time,” Engle said. “It’s kind of like a 30-36 hours of arctic air.”Temperatures will moderate quickly, he said, pushing the mercury to the 40s on Saturday and potentially even back to the 50s on Sunday.While the potential for a reprieve is heartening, the plummeting temperatures preceding the warm-up is no joke.Engle expects temperatures to be in the 20s Wednesday night and most of the day Thursday before potentially plunging into the single digits in the evening. If that’s not cold enough, the wind chill could make it feel close to zero, if not subzero, overnight.Long Islanders may remember the polar vortex’s last major romp across the Island in 2014, when it brought record cold temperatures not felt in four decades. At the time, the arctic blast set a 118-year record at Central Park.The polar vortex—which forecasters refer to as a “latitudinal displacement”—is always present in the arctic but occasionally it becomes displaced and travels south during the winter. Typically it’s the jet stream that dictates when the blast of arctic air pulls away from the poles, Engle said.The good news is that forecasters aren’t looking for any major storms in the coming week.Meanwhile, temperatures on the Island will hover around the low 40s Tuesday and Wednesday before the polar vortex strikes.last_img read more

first_imgA tanker transiting the Suez Canal suffered a blackout on February 15, at about 10:34 hours local time, impeding southbound convoys.The 52,579 dwt tanker was part of a northbound convoy of 21 vessels. The 14 vessels transiting in front of the tanker were unaffected.In an update on the situation, the Gulf Agency Company (GAC) confirmed to World Maritime News that the vessel had been escorted by three tugs to anchor at Great Bitter Lake, Ismailia, adding that traffic was expected to return to normal shortly.GAC did not reveal the name of the vessel, however, AIS data indicates to the possibility that the vessel in question is the Croatia-flagged tanker Pomer. According to VesselFinder data, the vessel was en route from Sumatra to the Black Sea port of Taman.No information about damages or pollution has been released.last_img read more

first_img Ruby Walsh made all of the running on the 4-6 favourite, trained by Willie Mullins, but he was ridden with a bit more restraint than had been expected. Even so, Un De Sceaux had all his rivals at full stretch coming down the hill. God’s Own (33-1) tried to make a race of it but he could not compete on the run to the line and had to settle for being beaten six lengths in second place. Un De Sceaux lived up to his billing as he duly landed the odds in the Racing Post Arkle Trophy at the Cheltenham Festival. Josses Hill (12-1) stayed on to take third spot, two lengths away. The victory gave Mullins and Walsh a double in the first two races of the meeting after Douvan struck in the opener. Walsh said: “He has got a turn of foot. I wasn’t going that hard and I knew that when I gave him a squeeze he would quicken up and he’s pinged the last. “He didn’t come to the Festival last year, he went to France twice, and you can see it’s made a man of him. “He’s not an easy horse and they have minded and nurtured him. They’ve done a great job. “I rode Master Minded and Azertyiuop so going that speed is nothing new to me.” Mullins said: “It was just fantastic. He was very clever. He jumped the first two nicely and settled into a rhythm in his jumping. “He jumped the water very easy, probably the first time he’d jumped one in his life, then came to the ditch which is a big test for a novice after the water. He pricked his ears and flew it again. “I got a fright when God’s Own came up beside him, but Ruby sat and then he just flew up the hill. “He’s not a typical racehorse and I don’t think he’s any pedigree, either, which is extraordinary. He is what we call a pure freak.” Mullins will now target Punchestown, and added: “He was very good with his jumping, he’s improved so much. He jumped like he was a handicapper the whole way round. Ruby thought he settled better today. He’s getting more mature with each race. He set himself up for the fences rather than getting Ruby to do it. “Some people like to go to Grade One races with a horse when they’re not ready, but I’m not keen on doing that. A jumper’s career is over many years and I don’t want it all at once, you have to let them mature and come round. Today it has paid off. I want them to go up the steps of the ladder one by one.” Tom George was delighted with the effort of God’s Own and thought the better ground had helped his cause. He said: “That isn’t a fluke, he was a Grade One winner last year when he beat Champagne Fever and a few others. “We had a blip in mid-winter but he simply can’t go on soft ground . We won’t even try running him on soft ground next year, good to soft is as bad as he wants it. “We will look at Aintree and Punchestown now, see where the best ground is and looking at that he will get two and a half miles.” Nicky Henderson was satisfied with Josses Hill and felt a sound pace had brought out the best in his runner. He said: “He’s run a great race. Fair play to Barry (Geraghty), he always said he would jump better in a faster run race. The quicker pace just helps his impulsion – when they are going slower he’s too brave. “I don’t know where we will go next, we could go two and a half miles, but I think Ruby should be fined for speeding!” Press Associationlast_img read more

first_imgELLSWORTH — The Ellsworth and George Stevens Academy softball and baseball teams split a pair of games at Ellsworth High School on Thursday.Ellsworth (1-1) beat GSA 20-0 (0-3) on the softball diamond. Pitchers Mackenzie Chipman and Sammy Mason allowed one hit and no runs in a combined five innings of work for Ellsworth, and junior Hannah Sargent had three hits and drove in a pair of runs.In baseball, GSA (3-0) scored four runs in the seventh inning to break open a two-run game and win 7-2, sending Ellsworth (1-1) to its first loss of the season.Both schools will play their next games Saturday, April 29. Ellsworth will be on the road for a noon game against Old Town, which won both baseball and softball state titles last year and remains unbeaten in both sports in 2017. GSA faces Orono at 2 p.m.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

first_imgSYDNEY: David Warner has created a niche for himself on social media during the global lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic. A dashing opener, the Australian southpaw is known for his power pact knocks and is rated as one of the finest the game has seen in white-ball cricket. But the creative and funny side of Warner came to the fore during the lockdown when he joined popular social media platform TikTok and started sharing fun-filled videos almost everyday on Instagram.On Monday, Warner made a compilation of some of his popular TikTok videos and captioned it with: “My TikTok story #thanks appreciate the help with the ideas everyone.” Warner said he made his TikTok debut on April 18 and since then has had a lot of fun with his kids and wife doing videos on the snazzy social media platform. “Cricket is my passion,” Warner said in one of the floating captions during his collage video. Warner has played 84 Tests for Australia, scoring 7,244 runs at an average of 48.94. IANSAlso watch: An exclusive with Ipsita Bharali only on the Sentinel Assamlast_img read more

first_img Related Stories Qaadir Sheppard and Amir Ealey suspended indefinitely due to violation of team rulesBlum: College football meant something in Syracuse, if only for a momentSyracuse AD Mark Coyle: ‘We’re going to get our degrees, and we’re going to compete for championships.’ Published on November 17, 2015 at 1:30 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Scott Shafer ripped off his headset, threw one of his possessions to the ground and had to be restrained by two of his assistants on the sideline. The Syracuse head coach was irate following a 15-yard illegal use of hands penalty on his team and his tirade cost SU another 15 yards.The two penalties moved Clemson from its own 21-yard line to the Orange’s 49 midway through the third quarter on Saturday against Clemson. At the time, Syracuse trailed by just seven to the nation’s top team.Throughout the Orange’s (3-7, 1-5 Atlantic Coast) current seven-game losing streak Shafer has stressed that his team continue to “control the controllables,” but that’s something he didn’t do against Clemson.When asked Tuesday on his weekly teleconference about the challenge of contradicting himself, Shafer said, “Good point. I made a mistake on that play. Nothing they could learn from.”Shafer said he didn’t apologize to his team for the slipup.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Just like I don’t expect an apology from my players when they make a mistake,” Shafer said. “We own it and move forward.”Discussions with Mark CoyleAt his introductory press conference in June, newly hired Director of Athletics Mark Coyle said he would take this year to evaluate Syracuse’s football program. Mired in a seven-game losing streak, its longest since 2005, questions about Shafer’s job security are swirling.Shafer, who has one year left on his contract, was asked on Tuesday if he’s had any discussions with Coyle about his job.“If I did, that would be between Mark and I,” Shafer said.He was then asked if he would prefer a resolution before the season ends.“I think for me, it’s just a matter of focusing on things that are out in front of us right now and all the other things that are behind closed doors are just that, behind closed doors between me, my staff and anybody in the administration.Amir Ealey and Qaadir Sheppard suspensionsAfter Saturday’s game, Syracuse announced that freshmen defensive ends Amir Ealey and Qaadir Sheppard were suspended indefinitely for violating team policy. Tuesday was the first time Shafer addressed the media since the announcement of the suspension, but when asked about their availability, he reiterated what was already announced.Said Shafer: “Both young men are suspended indefinitely for violating team policy.” Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

first_imgThis Saturday, ESPN College Gameday will be at the USC-Washington game in Seattle. I’ve grown up a USC fan, and for as long as I can remember, I’ve loved getting to watch Gameday and have always wanted to go to a show when they were at USC. I’ve always been entertained by the signs and the antics that come with the show. Now in my junior year, one of my main wishes as a student has been to have Gameday on campus. I still haven’t had the chance. I almost had the chance in 2013 when Gameday was at Stanford when USC was visiting Palo Alto. Ironically enough, my parents were at the game while I was in the mountains on a church retreat. I had an amazing time while on retreat, but getting the videos of the Trojan victory and fans storming the field from current students, friends and USC alum sent to me made it all bittersweet. In 2014, I lived vicariously through my best friend Nicolette, a Baylor fan, when Gameday stopped in Waco, Texas for the Kansas State-Baylor game. It was really cool to hear about how she spent the night on a grass field surrounded by her fellow Bears fans making posters, getting free gear and bonding together as a fan base. She was even lucky enough to get her sign on the broadcast. It was everything I had wanted to experience, but I looked forward to the possibility of Gameday being at USC either of the next three seasons. There were rumors and speculations of Gameday coming to USC during my sophomore season, but nothing panned out. I was halfway through my time at USC, but undeterred from the chances of it actually happening. On Sunday morning, while I was at home, my dad came in my room to tell me, “Guess where Gameday is going on Saturday?” Frankly, I didn’t want to believe it. I even hesitated to say the Washington game because it meant that Gameday was going to be at a USC game and I was not. Of course, Gameday would be at Washington. It stung even more because I was supposed to be in Seattle for the game. Not only would I get to work the game on the field, I was also going to get to visit friends from home that I hadn’t seen in awhile. On top of all of that, I would get to participate in the excitement that is College Gameday. But, of course, because of some commitments for a class project, I am not able to go up to Seattle for the game. It’s a bummer for a number of reasons, because I also love Seattle, but it’s a huge bummer because I’m missing out on the opportunity to participate in Gameday.With only one home game left against 3-6 Notre Dame, I can almost certainly say that College Gameday will not be making the trek to L.A. to cover the game. Another USC football season through, another season without Gameday on USC’s campus. Just as I have over the last two seasons, I’ll survive by looking forward to the possibility that Gameday will make an appearance. Looking forward, there’s a huge part of me hoping that Gameday will come in September when the Texas Longhorns make their way to the Coliseum. While the Trojans have a 4-1 all-time record against the Longhorns, every Trojans fan knows about the poor taste left behind by the 2005 National Championship Game — the last time the Trojans and Longhorns faced off. Even though this season isn’t done yet, I’ll be looking forward to next season and Sept. 16 when there’s a real chance that College Gameday could once again be on our campus. Jodee Storm Sullivan is a junior majoring in broadcast and digital journalism. Her column, “The Storm Report,” runs Tuesdays.last_img read more