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first_imgSouth Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg announced in a press conference Thursday afternoon that he has been called to active duty with the U.S. Navy and will be deployed to Afghanistan next year. A report from ABC News said the mayor will be on active duty from Feb. 28, 2014, until Sept. 30, 2014. Buttigieg was commissioned as an officer in the US Navy Reserve in 2009 and holds the rank Lieutenant Junior Grade, the report stated. At the press conference, Buttigieg named City Controller Mark Neal as deputy mayor for the duration of his deployment. Indiana law (Indiana Code section 5-6-2) holds that a mayor called to active duty is not considered to have vacated his office and so can name a deputy mayor in his absence. The deputy mayor, then, is to perform the mayor’s duties during his deployment. “My primary responsibility and focus every day is to lead South Bend forward,” Buttigieg said at the press conference. “At the same time, as a military officer I have made a commitment to our country, and my orders require me to keep that promise by going to Afghanistan next year. I am ready to serve and perform duties I have been training to do for years, and then look forward to coming home to resume the extraordinarily fulfilling and important work of leading our city as mayor.” As City Controller, Neal’s responsibilities include overseeing the city’s fiscal management, human resources, information technology, purchasing insurance, labor negotiations, the budgeting process and performance management measures, the report said. U.S. Senator Joe Donnelly, a Notre Dame graduate, released a statement following the announcement, commending Buttigieg’s service. “There is no greater service than that of our men and women in uniform,” Donnelly said in the statement. “I thank Mayor Pete for his service thus far as an officer in the U.S. Navy Reserve, and I wish him well as he uses his training to serve in Afghanistan next year. “In Indiana, we have a proud tradition of heeding the call to protect and defend our country, and I thank all Hoosiers who are currently or have previously been a member of our Armed Forces.”last_img read more

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015 Pippin With a score by Schwartz and a book by Roger O. Hirson, Pippin tells the story of a young prince searching for his corner of the sky. In addition to Massey, the current cast includes Tony winner Andrea Martin, John Dossett, Charlotte d’Amboise and Rachel Bay Jones. Carly Hughes will begin performances as the Leading Player beginning September 19. The Tony-winning revival is directed by Diane Paulus. Kaufman will make his Broadway debut in the Stephen Schwartz tuner. He was crowned the winner of the sixth season of the NBC hit in May, having been coached by Grammy winner Usher. Related Shows View Comments The Voice Season 6 winner Josh Kaufman will take center stage at the Music Box Theatre as the titular prince in Pippin. Kaufman will begin performances on November 4 and play a limited engagement through January 4, 2015. He steps in for Broadway.com video blogger Kyle Dean Massey, who will take his final bow on November 2.last_img read more

first_imgFor more than 250 years, Southerners have enjoyed the flavor of wild and domesticatedmuscadine grapes. Now, new research on muscadines is finding that they are one of nature’smost healthful foods.In the early 1990s, Betty Ector began analyzing muscadine grapes at Mississippi StateUniversity. She found they were richer in fiber, zinc, manganese, iron and calcium thanmost other fruits.May Fight Heart DiseaseIn later research, Ector found that they are one of the world’s richest sources ofellagic acid (thought to help prevent cancer) and the phenolic compound, resveratrol.High levels of resveratrol are found in both fresh muscadines and processed-muscadineproducts. It is thought to be an important part of the “French paradox,” inwhich French people with rich diets who drink red wine have much less heart disease thanexpected.May Fight Cancer, TooA new study by Minnie Holmes-McNary, at the University of North Carolina’s medicalschool in Chapel Hill, has determined that resveratrol is also a potent anticancercompound.The substance switches off a protective mechanism in cells and, as a result, makesinvading cancer cells vulnerable to the body’s natural defenses.The study, funded in part by the National Institute of Health, also found thatmuscadine wines can contain up to seven times more resveratrol than regular wines.Fresh Muscadines AvailableFresh muscadines are available from Aug. 1 to mid-October, depending on the location inthe state. Since the University of Georgia grape breeders developed large-fruited typessuch as “Fry” and “Summit,” muscadines have become available ingrocery stores and many farm markets. Nearly all Southeastern wineries also producemuscadine wine.If you haven’t tried muscadine grapes, buy a package and see if you like them. Theirrich flavor and chewy skins are an old Southern favorite with outstanding health benefits.last_img read more

first_imgSource: The Messenger Less than seven weeks after Eagle Publications and the Twin State Valley Media Network of Claremont, NH announced they were bankrupt – instantly closing the doors of the Eagle Times daily and the weekly Message for the Week, The Connecticut Valley Spectator and The Weekly Flea – most of the staff of The Message are now involved with a new paper, The Messenger.The Messenger s 32-page first issue hit the streets on Tuesday, August 25.Co-edited by Robert Smith and Joe Milliken, the former co-editors of The Message for the Week, The Messenger is published by New Market Press of Middlebury, VT. It will be distributed every Wednesday, with a direct mailing of over 20,000 copies to the paper s core towns, including Ludlow, Londonderry, Chester, Springfield, Rockingham and Westminster. Another 5,000-plus copies will be dropped at key distribution centers in Walpole, Charlestown and Claremont in New Hampshire, and from Brattleboro north and west as far as Rutland in Vermont, making it Southern Vermont s largest weekly.The Messenger is a positive news and lifestyle paper, Smith said, with an emphasis on local community events, local sports, arts, entertainment and food. It will have a towns-style format, along with the local Joe Milliken’s local Sports pages, and A&E, Food and Home & Garden sections each week.In addition to Smith and Milliken, also working for The Messenger are several other former Message and Eagle Times employees, including Frank Amato, Deb Collier and Rick Martin in sales, office person Pam Crowley, and graphic designer Adrian Newkirk. In time, Smith said, as the paper grows, it is hoped even more former employees will be back. When we got the sudden announcement that our paper was closing on July 9, Smith said, As a staff we agreed to stay in touch and see if we could find some interest in creating a new paper to take The Message s place. While daily papers are struggling, we knew that The Message had been holding its own, and it had a lot of loyal readers and advertisers.Smith said he was surprised at the amount of interest that surfaced immediately in creating a new paper for the Southern Vermont region, including several from successful newspaper publishers throughout the Northeast. After what happened with Eagle Publications, we were cautious, Smith said. We wanted to make sure we were working with someone who knew how to put out a profitable weekly paper. Frank Amato got in contact with New Market and arranged for the staff to meet with them. We were impressed with them, and they liked the fact that they had a full, experienced staff to work with.Smith said things proceeded rapidly from that first meeting, and especially after the staff got together and agreed to work with New Market to create a brand new paper. Finding office space became critical. We would never have pulled this off without the staff here really taking charge and making it work, especially Frank Amato. Smith said. I think between Frank and I, we must have looked at 30 potential office sites from Ludlow to Rockingham. But less than four weeks later, we moved into our new offices on The Square in Bellows Falls. And it was a day less than five weeks from that first meeting Frank arranged til when our first issue hit the streets.last_img read more

first_imgA solid link between global warming and polar bear mortality emerged in 2004 when researchers were surprised to find four drowned bears in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska’s North Slope. The meltdown of sea ice—the polar ice cap had retreated a record 160 miles to the north—forced the bears to swim unusually long distances to find solid ice, which they depend on as hunting and fishing platforms and for rest and recuperation. And more recently, USGS researcher Steven Amstrup published findings that polar bears are “stalking, killing and eating other polar bears” as competition for scarcer food heats up. SEND YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTIONS TO: EarthTalk, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php. EarthTalk is now a book! Details and order information at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalkbook.200351383-001 Dear EarthTalk: Some say that polar bears are going to disappear in 50 years, but Alaskan officials insist their populations are recovering. What’s the real story?             — Harper Howe, San Francisco, CA The real story is that affording the polar bear endangered species protection would bring further regulations capping greenhouse gas emissions, a threat to Alaska’s main economic driver: oil revenues. Alaska professor Rick Steiner uncovered the misinformation in Palin’s claims when he found evidence that the state’s top wildlife officials agreed with federal findings that polar bears are headed toward extinction: “So, here you have the state’s marine mammal experts, three or four of them, very reputable scientists, agreeing with the federal proposed rule to list polar bears and with the USGS [United States Geological Survey] studies showing that polar bears are in serious trouble,” said Steiner. Beyond global warming, other risks to polar bear populations include toxic contaminants in the surrounding environment as well as in the fatty tissue of the prey they rely on, conflicts with shipping, stresses from recreational polar-bear watching, oil and gas exploration and development, and overharvesting through legal and illegal hunting. The erroneous notion that Alaska wildlife officials don’t believe the polar bear is in trouble was put forth by Alaska governor Sarah Palin when she initiated a suit against the federal government in hopes of overturning its decision to include the polar bear under the umbrella of endangered species protection. “I strongly believe that adding them to the list is the wrong move at this time,” Palin wrote in a January 2008 New York Times Op Ed piece. “My decision is based on a comprehensive review by state wildlife officials of scientific information from a broad range of climate, ice and polar bear experts.” The nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity presents an even more pessimistic forecast. If current warming trends continue, they say, two-thirds of all polar bears—including all of Alaska’s polar bears—will be extinct by 2050. Both organizations agree that the species as a whole will likely be wiped out completely within 100 years unless humans can get global warming in check. CONTACTS: International Union for the Conservation of Nature, www.iucn.org; Center for Biological Diversity, www.biologicaldiversity.org. There is no doubt that polar bears are in serious trouble. Already on the ropes due to other human threats, their numbers are falling faster than ever as a result of retreating ice due to global warming. The nonprofit International Union for the Conservation of Nature, which added the polar bear to its “Red List” of the world’s most imperiled wildlife back in 2006, predicts a 30 percent decline in population for the great white rulers of the Arctic within three generations (about 45 years).last_img read more

first_img 19SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Deciding to retire is a monumental, life-changing event for many CEOs. Some sit on the fence for a few years or have a set target date, while others stay in the role and may or may not be effective. One credit union board chair recently said, “Our CEO has a set date of April 15, 2018.” Another chair had a different story: “We don’t know when he will leave yet; it might be in the next 2–5 years.” The latter response, a clear indication of uncertainty, sets off my risk-alert bell.Boards of directors provide oversight for overall enterprise risk management. A plan for steering the ship is needed even  before the CEO announces her “by when” date. Not preparing a plan and community strategy leaves the organization at potential risk for lack of strategic direction and employee morale.Flight risk for the executive team is also a concern; they want to feel safe in knowing the plan and how they fit into it. Greater uncertainty surrounding the CEO exit date correlates to an organization at risk.Practical and Proactive Steps to Managing Risk of Lost Leadership continue reading »last_img read more

first_img Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 2 Oct 2019 6:26 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link601Shares Advertisement Pedro Chirivella’s appearance against MK Dons nearly cost Liverpool a place in the fourth round of the Carabao Cup (Picture: Getty)Liverpool will face Arsenal in the next round of the Carabao Cup after they escaped with a fine for fielding an ineligible player during last week’s win over MK Dons.‘The club accepts the judgement, outcome and punishment imposed by the EFL,’ said a Liverpool spokesperson.‘We believe it is proportionate with the technical indiscretion committed and will be making no further representations.‘Even though there were mitigating factors, which were beyond out control and jurisdiction, we believe it appropriate we apologise to the competition’s governing body and also to MK Dons.’ADVERTISEMENTLiverpool were hit with a £200,000 punishment,  after Pedro Chirivella made a second half appearance, his first for his club in three years following loan spells at Go Ahead Eagles, Willem II and Extremadura, without having been given an international transfer certificate.AdvertisementAdvertisementMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘The player was always contracted to Liverpool FC during this period, and the reason he was not eligible was because the club did not have the relevant international clearance following expiry of an earlier loan agreement,’ said an EFL spokesperson.‘The club’s breach was in part due to challenges it encountered with securing correct international clearance and subsequent ability to include the player on teamsheets despite lack of clearance. As a result the board concluded the most appropriate sanction was a financial penalty.’Liverpool, whose passage through to the next round was secured thanks to goals from James Milner and Ki-Jana Hoever, will now take on Unai Emery’s Arsenal at Anfield on October 29.MORE: Sadio Mane and Naby Keita warn Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp about Red Bull Salzburg’s supportMORE: Erling Haaland & Dominik Szoboszlai: The two Red Bull Salzburg wonderkids that can trouble Liverpool Liverpool to face Arsenal as Jurgen Klopp’s side escape Carabao Cup expulsioncenter_img Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgOwner of First National real estate Wayne Nicholson is celebrating the company’s 25th birthday.A REAL ESTATE agent and business owner who has been in the industry for nearly 40 years has been appointed the REIQ’s Townsville Zone Chair.First National Nicholson principal Wayne Nicholson has taken over the role from Damien Keyes after Mr Keyes became a REIQ regional director.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020Mr Nicholson is a life member of the Real Estate Institute of Queensland and a former zone chair.His business is the longest-trading residential real estate office in Townsville (trading under one entity). He’s also an experienced auctioneer, former national chairman of directors of the First National Australia brand, a qualified real estate trainer and a Fellow of the REIQ.Mr Nicholson said he was looking forward to helping to ensure the needs of Townsville’s real estate sector are heard at the highest level.“Townsville is my home and where I’ve raised my family. I wouldn’t live anywhere else,” he said.“Our real estate market has weathered some challenges over recent years but all the experts agree with me, this market is on the way back.”last_img read more

first_imgLincoln Pensions suggested that the publication of separate TPR guidance, detailing how pension funds might support the growth of their sponsors, could be responsible for the lack of holistic-risk implementation at FTSE 350 companies.  According to research conducted by the firm, pension funds supporting the growth of their sponsor companies are forced to increase investment risk to offset lower contributions and a weaker covenant.  The research also found that FTSE 350 schemes that depend more on their employers, as opposed to their covenants, also tend to have higher allocations to risk-seeking assets.“[This indicates] schemes may be trying to invest their way to full funding,” Lincoln’s research says.“In doing this, they may be taking too much investment risk relative to the employer covenant rather than seeking increased contributions from their employers.”Lincoln also found that FTSE 350 schemes had an accounting deficit of £72bn, but this is combined with the £100bn of investment risk – with the average allocation to risk assets at 44%.Matthew Harrison, managing director at Lincoln Pensions, said: “The share of return-seeking assets does not decrease as the schemes get larger in the context of their employer, despite clear guidelines in TPR’s code of practice on funding [schemes].“[The] analysis may lead to scheme funding discussions that move away from the historical focus on funding today’s deficit towards a greater understanding of investment risk volatility and a balance in the scheme’s overall risk profile.” The pension funds of FTSE 350 companies are carrying £100bn (€140bn) in investment risk underwritten by their sponsors as they struggle to adapt to the regulator’s new holistic risk approach.Advisory firm Lincoln Pensions said it saw little evidence FTSE 350 schemes were implementing The Pensions Regulator’s (TPR) holistic risk-management approach.This approach, published in the DB Code of Funding last July, calls on schemes to account for the strength of the employer covenant when calculating investment-risk tolerance and thereby ensure risks between a company and its pension fund are balanced. The regulator said pension funds’ approach to funding and deficits should take into account all risks and that they should find appropriate investment-risk tolerances in line with risks stemming from sponsor failure.last_img read more

first_imgPensions-Sicherungs-Verein, Deutsche Post DHL, KPA Pension, Almi Företagspartner, Folksam, Svensk Forsäkring, Tryg, ASR, Russell Investments, La Française, MEAGPensions-Sicherungs-Verein (PSV) – Benedikt Köster will be joining the German pension lifeboat fund’s executive board with effect from January 1, 2021 to take over from Hans Melchiors as head of the operations and finance department. Melchiors will be stepping down from the board at the end of April to enter retirement.Köster is currently senior vice president for group pensions at Deutsche Post DHL Group in Bonn, having joined the company in 2006 from then Aon Jauch & Huebener Consulting, where he had been the international pension accounting chief. He is a member of the German actuarial association (DAV) and on the mathematical experts working group at aba, Germany’s main occupational pensions association.PSV is the €7.5bn mutual insurance association for occupational pension schemes in Germany and Luxembourg. It insures around €345bn of liabilities, covering some 11.1 million beneficiaries. KPA Pension — Britta Burreau, the chief executive officer of Sweden’s KPA Pension – a subsidiary of pensions and insurance group Folksam – is leaving to head up state-owned financing firm Almi Företagspartner. She is replacing the previous CEO Göran Lundwall, who decided to step down from the role at the end of this year. Burreau has led KPA Pension since 2016 and, prior to this, was CEO of Nordea Liv & Pension. Almi Företagspartner said she will start work in the new job by 15 November at the latest.Folksam/Svensk Forsäkring — Swedish insurance industry association Svensk Forsäkring, which counts the country’s largest pension funds as its members, has appointed the head of pensions and insurance group Folksam, Ylva Wessén, as a new member of its supervisory board.She has worked for the Folksam group since 2007, becoming its permanent chief executive officer in December 2019. Announcing a series of new appointments to the board as well as new tenures for existing members, Svensk Forsäkring also said its supervisory board chair Louise Sander, CEO of Handelsbanken Liv, had been re-elected, along with deputy chair Fredrik Bergström, the CEO of Swedish pensions and insurance group Länsförsäkringar.Tryg — Nordic general insurance group Tryg has appointed Christina Bustrup as its new head of pensions. She confirmed in a post on LinkedIn that she would be starting work in the new role in June. Bustrup joins the firm from her current role as chief commercial officer for Danish pensions IT company Edlund. She is also a member of the supervisory board of the Bank of Greenland.ASR – ASR Asset Management, part of Dutch insurance group ASR, has appointed Bas Kragten, Jules Koekkoek, Remco van Amelsfoort and Vincent Kroes as senior managers of its structured fixed income team. It said they will focus on investment grade debt instruments as well as ESG impact investments. All four joined from Dutch asset manager Actiam, the successor of SNS Asset Management.Kragten, who will lead the team, has been co-head of fixed income at Actiam, head of asset-backed securities at ING IM as well as senior investment manager at NIB Capital AM. Koekkoek’s previous positions include executive director at USB Investment Bank and Nomura. Kroes has been associate director at KPMG Corporate Finance as well as supervisor at the European Central Bank.Russell Investments – The asset manager has further strengthened its presence in the Dutch market with the addition of two experienced investment industry professionals. Jaap Hoek is joining as director of investment strategy and solutions for Northern Europe, and Marleen Barents-Jager as sales director retail for Benelux and the Nordics.Hoek joins from Robeco, where he was most recently a director and portfolio strategist in the company’s investment solutions team.Barents-Jager recently worked for Principal Global Investors, where she was responsible for business development activities, promoting and distributing the company’s range of mutual funds.La Française Group – Following an internal consultation that began several months ago, chairman of the executive board Xavier Lépine is leaving the €69.3bn asset manager and being replaced by Patrick Rivière, who until now held the position of chief executive officer.The group has also expanded the executive board with the addition of Marc Betrand and Philippe Lecomte, who have been with the group for many years already. The company said its reorganisation would help the group develop its multi-boutique model.Eric Charpentier, CEO of owner Crédit Mutuel Nord Europe, said: “I would like to thank Xavier Lépine for his valuable cooperation over all these years as well as his outstanding contribution to the Group’s expansion and his enthusiasm as a developer.“I welcome the appointment of Patrick Rivière and the new management team, who will be able to best respond to the current developments and successfully continue the expansion of La Française Group.”MEAG – The Munich-based asset manager MEAG has named two new CIOs. Joining from JP Morgan Asset Management, Prashant Sharma will assume responsibility for the management of the liquid assets portfolio as CIO for public markets.Separately, Michael Bös will become CIO, alternative assets, overseeing the division that will be created effective 1 July by bringing together under a single manager the illiquid assets and real estate businesses at MEAG Munich Ergo Asset Management. Bös has been heading up the investment strategy division at MEAG’s owner Munich Re.Sharma and Bös will effectively be succeeding Thomas Kurtz and Wolfgang Wente, respectively.MEAG manages the assets of reinsurance giant Munich Re and subsidiary ERGO, and currently manages €324bn, according to the company.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here.last_img read more