Month: January 2021

first_imgTom Martello has been recently promoted to the position of Quality Manager for the VEMAS Corp. Tom has extensive experience with LEAN and Six Sigma manufacturing environments and presents a focus in process improvement. VEMAS, located in Middlebury, V.T is a woman-owned company specializing in electronic contract manufacturing.Loan Mayer, has recently been hired as the Engineering Manager at the VEMAS Corporation. Loan, a graduate of the University of California at San Diego in structural engineering, has 13 years of experience in new product introduction. VEMAS, located in Middlebury, V.T is a woman-owned company specializing in electronic contract manufacturinglast_img read more

first_imgWhey-based Wood Finish Company Based In HardwickMONTPELIER, Vt. – A Hardwick company that makes wood finishes from a dairy by-product has won a prestigious award for environmentally friendly building products and hopes to parley that into continued growth.Vermont Natural Coatings’ PolyWhey(tm) product, developed with the assistance of the Vermont Department of Economic Development and the University of Vermont, was selected as one of BuildingGreen’s 2008 Top-10 Green Building Products by the editors of Environmental Building News and GreenSpec(r).This seventh annual award recognizes the most innovative and exciting green building products added to the GreenSpec(r) Directory during the past year or covered in Environmental Building News.”When government can be a catalyst for innovation, the result is quality jobs for Vermonters,” said Kevin Dorn, Secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development. “We’re very pleased to have played a small role in Vermont Natural Coatings’ success, and hope we can help them continue to grow.”Vermont Natural Coatings’ PolyWhey(tm) wood finishes are designed to enhance the innate beauty of wood and preserve it with a durable shield that is environmentally safe for those who work with it and for those who live with it.The products are the result of recent scientific innovations using whey proteins, a natural by-product of the dairy industry. This hard-wearing “polymer” wood coating meets the highest professional and environmental standards.The products were developed at the University of Vermont’s Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences by Dr. Mingruo Guo, Ph. D., with the help of funding secured through the efforts of George Robson of the Vermont Department of Economic Development.Vermont Natural Coatings was founded in 2004 by Andrew Meyer who began with the idea of using a by-product of the cheese-making process to develop environmentally-friendly wood treatment applications.The University of Vermont, which had patented Guo’s formulas, licensed them to Meyer, who had worked with Guo, for the North American market.”We were thrilled to be selected as one of the top ten new products this year in the rapidly growing category of green products,” said Meyer.”This just underscores the enthusiastic and positive response we’ve received from the industry and the public for our products, which are not only green, but offer a rapid drying, odor-free option for floor coating without compromising on durability or aesthetics,” he said.Upon receiving the award at the recent Green Build Boston conference in Boston, Vermont Natural Coatings announced that they will be launching a line of outdoor wood treatment applications and other natural whey-based products after several years of testing. Orders for their exterior line are already being accepted for spring delivery.The company, which currently employs four, is seeking investors to grow the company to the next level. “We’re seeking partners who share our vision for high quality products and commitment to the economic vitality of rural Vermont,” Meyer said.A big driver in the development of green products continues to be the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED(r) Rating System (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), which awards points for the use of certain product types or for the energy or water savings that certain green products can achieve.”Designers of LEED buildings are looking for green products, and manufacturers, such as Vermont Natural Coatings, are responding,” said Alex Wilson, president and coeditor of BuildingGreen and GreenSpec, the leading national directory of green building products.”Our selections of the Top-10 Green Building Products represent a wide range of product types in many different application areas,” noted Wilson. “Most of the Top-10 products this year, including Vermont Natural Coatings, have multiple environmental attributes.”For additional information, visit www.vermontnaturalcoatings.com(link is external) or www.thinkvermont.com(link is external)last_img read more

first_imgSource: The Messenger Less than seven weeks after Eagle Publications and the Twin State Valley Media Network of Claremont, NH announced they were bankrupt – instantly closing the doors of the Eagle Times daily and the weekly Message for the Week, The Connecticut Valley Spectator and The Weekly Flea – most of the staff of The Message are now involved with a new paper, The Messenger.The Messenger s 32-page first issue hit the streets on Tuesday, August 25.Co-edited by Robert Smith and Joe Milliken, the former co-editors of The Message for the Week, The Messenger is published by New Market Press of Middlebury, VT. It will be distributed every Wednesday, with a direct mailing of over 20,000 copies to the paper s core towns, including Ludlow, Londonderry, Chester, Springfield, Rockingham and Westminster. Another 5,000-plus copies will be dropped at key distribution centers in Walpole, Charlestown and Claremont in New Hampshire, and from Brattleboro north and west as far as Rutland in Vermont, making it Southern Vermont s largest weekly.The Messenger is a positive news and lifestyle paper, Smith said, with an emphasis on local community events, local sports, arts, entertainment and food. It will have a towns-style format, along with the local Joe Milliken’s local Sports pages, and A&E, Food and Home & Garden sections each week.In addition to Smith and Milliken, also working for The Messenger are several other former Message and Eagle Times employees, including Frank Amato, Deb Collier and Rick Martin in sales, office person Pam Crowley, and graphic designer Adrian Newkirk. In time, Smith said, as the paper grows, it is hoped even more former employees will be back. When we got the sudden announcement that our paper was closing on July 9, Smith said, As a staff we agreed to stay in touch and see if we could find some interest in creating a new paper to take The Message s place. While daily papers are struggling, we knew that The Message had been holding its own, and it had a lot of loyal readers and advertisers.Smith said he was surprised at the amount of interest that surfaced immediately in creating a new paper for the Southern Vermont region, including several from successful newspaper publishers throughout the Northeast. After what happened with Eagle Publications, we were cautious, Smith said. We wanted to make sure we were working with someone who knew how to put out a profitable weekly paper. Frank Amato got in contact with New Market and arranged for the staff to meet with them. We were impressed with them, and they liked the fact that they had a full, experienced staff to work with.Smith said things proceeded rapidly from that first meeting, and especially after the staff got together and agreed to work with New Market to create a brand new paper. Finding office space became critical. We would never have pulled this off without the staff here really taking charge and making it work, especially Frank Amato. Smith said. I think between Frank and I, we must have looked at 30 potential office sites from Ludlow to Rockingham. But less than four weeks later, we moved into our new offices on The Square in Bellows Falls. And it was a day less than five weeks from that first meeting Frank arranged til when our first issue hit the streets.last_img read more

first_imgThe most recent Dodge Report analysis of construction contracts shows that Vermont is ahead of where it was a year ago because of heavy investment in highway and bridge building, much of which is due to federal stimulus funding. While residential and commercial construction continue to show weakness, those components are showing some rebound from the depths of the recession over the last 12 months. In all, both the most recent month ($76.1 million) reviewed (September) and the year-to-date ($852.9 million) data show that total construction contracts are ahead of where they were in 2008. The McGraw-Hill Dodge Reports look at construction projects under contract to determine future construction spending.last_img read more

first_imgNortheast Dairy Farmers reached a settlement agreement with Dean Foods Company in their class action antitrust lawsuit against Dean, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and Dairy Marketing Services (DMS). The agreement will include $30 million in monetary damages and injunctive relief that calls for Dean to purchase a portion of its raw milk from multiple Northeast sources.”This is a major win for dairy farmers in the Northeast who have been squeezed by monopolization and price-fixing,” said Benjamin Brown, an attorney at Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, PLLC, which represents the plaintiff dairy farmers. “We are pleased that Dean Foods is working with plaintiffs to put this practice behind them.”The lawsuit — Alice H. Allen, et al. vs. Dairy Farmers of America — is far from resolved, however, added Kit A. Pierson of Cohen Milstein.”The case is continuing against the remaining defendants, Dairy Farmers of America and its marketing affiliate Dairy Marketing Services,” explained Pierson. “Still at issue are charges that the DFA — the nation’s largest cooperative — monopolized a level of distribution of fluid milk in the Northeast and forced dairy farmers to join DFA or its marketing affiliate DMS to survive.”DFA and DMS have been named in the suit for engaging in monopolization, price-fixing, and other anticompetitive conduct.”The fact that Dean has agreed to purchase raw milk from multiple sources is a big step in the right direction,” said Robert Abrams of Howrey, LLP, which also represents the plaintiff dairy farmers. “What dairy farmers want is a choice between different bottlers. They have been living in a world that is monopolized and they pay the prices that are offered to them or they don’t sell milk. What we want is choice and competition.”The next step is for the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont — where the lawsuit was filed in August 2009 — to grant preliminary approval of the settlement agreement. Notice will then go out to the estimated 5,000 to 10,000 Northeast dairy farmers who could be eligible to file a claim for monetary damages.Abrams added, “We are pleased that a settlement with Dean has been reached and look forward to a timely court approval.”For more information, visit www.cohenmilstein.com(link is external).SOURCE Northeast Dairy Farmers WASHINGTON, Dec. 24, 2010 /PRNewswire/last_img read more