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first_imgIqbal Sobhan Chowdhury, media advisor to Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, has clarified that India’s posture on the Rohingya refugees would not impact the friendly relations between the two neighbouring countries.“Our relations are based on mutual trust and cooperation at all levels, and so an external problem cannot disturb it,” Mr. Chowdhury said during an interaction with journalists here on Saturday. He conceded that there was an initial confusion about India’s position on issues of ‘persecution of Rohingyas’ in Myanmar and massive influx of refugees in Bangladesh. “Now we see India is calling for permanent resolution to conflicts in Myanmar and adopting a humanitarian approach by sending relief to refugees stranded in Bangladesh,” he said.Mr. Chowdhury said that 5.5 lakh Rohingyas had so far entered southeastern districts of Bangladesh since the latest cycle of violence erupted in Rakhine province of Myanmar. Over six lakh Rohingya refugees were already stranded in Bangladesh and that took the total number to 12 lakh, he said.The veteran journalist stated that the present crisis was different from what had happened in the past. “Earlier there was turmoil and tension, resulting in Rohingya exodus, but now they are being driven out in a planned manner – killing, burning villages and crops, terrorising people with rapes and torture,” he said.During interaction with newsmen he supported apprehension that external forces and terrorist cells could try to exploit sentiment of ‘stateless Rohingya’ to engage them in subversive activities.“Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has time and again made it clear that Bangladesh was providing relief and shelter to the evacuees on humanitarian ground and any rebellious activities in the relief camps would be tolerated”, Mr. Chowdhury stated.last_img read more

first_imgCONTRIBUTED PHOTO/STEPHEN TANBACOLOD CITY—Stephan Schrock couldn’t have picked a bigger, more important match to make up for all the time he missed away from Ceres-Negros.On another magical night at a packed Panaad Stadium, OJ Porteria and Manny Ott delivered the goals, while Schrock provided the steel and creativity as the Busmen subdued Home United of Singapore, 2-0, to rule the Asean zonal stage of the AFC Cup.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo The victory completed a 3-2 win on aggregate and sent the Busmen to the inter-zonal semifinals against Istiklol of Tajikistan starting Aug. 22 in Dushanbe. Ceres will host the second leg on Sept. 12.“We left it all out there on the pitch” said Schrock, who rejoined the team in April, which meant he was only added to the squad for the zonal finals. “We put in the performance of our lives in this final. We deserve to make history for the club, the country and Southeast Asia.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsPorteria gave the Busmen an early lead on the away goals rule with a close-range volley off an Iain Ramsay cross in the second minute, before Ott’s superb free kick in the 41st minute doubled the advantage.The first half performance, where the hosts won a penalty that was wasted by Fernando Rodriguez and created a couple more clear-cut chances, was in stark contrast over their uninspired display in the 2-1 loss in the first leg last week. NGCP on security risk: Chinese just technical advisers View comments “It was a very important game and I’m just honored to be given a starting place,” Schrock said.“I had to prove that I deserve to start because my teammates have been sacrificing the past six months to get us to this stage. I owe it to my teammates and our supporters.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul But even with the visitors pushing men forward in the second half, the Busmen proved resolute, preserving a clean sheet for the first time in six matches.The Busmen broke down in tears upon hearing the final whistle and becoming the first team to rule the zonal stage, which started in February.And considering the fact that the club owned by Leorey Yanson was only a provincial powerhouse five years ago, the achievement was nevertheless impressive.Schrock worked tirelessly on both ends, winning 14 duels and creating five chances in a dynamic display that reminded why he was once a regular in the top-flight in Germany.The midfield maestro said he was merely making up for lost time.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side MOST READcenter_img LATEST STORIES Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Gonzales wins as Frayna falterslast_img read more

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe federal government has been ordered to hand over millions of documents to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is trying to determine the depth of the church-run Indian Residential schools that removed children from their families for more than a 100 years.Ontario Superior Court Justice Stephen Goudge ruled Wednesday the government is required to unearth the documents that the TRC has deemed relevant in order to fulfill its mandate.The TRC is trying to prepare a historical record of the schools and produce a report when finished.Goudge said the documents were needed to finish the report in a fixed timeframe and budget.But federal government lawyers fought it saying the TRC was welcome to search files housed in Library and Archives Canada (LAC) in Ottawa.Lawyers for the TRC said it’d take too long, plus they didn’t have the budget do that.Now the government must make copies for them.“All are inconsistent with excluding documents archived at LAC from Canadas obligation to provide relevant documents to and for the use of the TRC, compiled in an organized manner,” said Goudge in his decision. “None suggest that the TRC would be left on its own with LAC documents. This simply adds weight to the plain meaning of the words used, that Canada’s obligation to provide all relevant documents includes those housed at LAC.”Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan said in December he saw no “issue” in his government’s handling of residential school documents and blamed the head of the TRC for creating the controversy and slowing things down.He made the comments at the Commons Aboriginal affairs committee and said the TRC would have all the documents by the summer.“I fail to see the issue with their documents,” Duncan said. “Federally, I think we are in pretty good shape.”Duncan placed the blame for the controversy at the feet of TRC Chair Murray Sinclair. Duncan said he’s received positive signals from Sinclair’s co-commissioners, Wilton Littlechild and Marie Wilson.“It is only in Justice Sinclair that we are getting this kind of response,” said Duncan. “I don’t know what he is doing. I would like to think we can move on with the process.”Sinclair said Wednesday the courts made the right decision.“The TRC asked the Ontario Superior Court of Justice for clarification of its mandate as laid out in the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, and this is precisely what we have received today,” said Sinclair in a statement. “We’re grateful to be able to continue the Commission’s work of gathering and protecting for future generations documents that are relevant to the history of the Indian Residential Schools in Canada. We look forward to carrying out this work in cooperation with the Government of Canada. We especially acknowledge the clarity of Justice Goudge’s decision.”Aboriginal Affairs deputy minister Michael Wernick, who also appeared before the committee, said the TRC would get all residential school records, including RCMP files. Wernick said the TRC would also get documents ranging up to the last existing school which shut down in 1996 and some documents around the conclusion of the multi-billion dollar residential school settlement.Wernick said the TRC has already received over a million documents.Wernick said the government, however, is drawing a line around documents from the negotiations leading to the court settlement and the private files of residential school survivors seeking compensation.“We have a legitimate disagreement about the relevance of documents from the 2005 negotiations,” Wernick said. “We simply disagree they need to see all the applications and adjudications that are now under way.”APTN National News was told in December that the TRC was seeking cabinet documents from the Paul Martin government years on the eventual residential school settlement.The RCMP was involved in snatching children from their homes and forcing them to attend residential schools. The TRC believes the RCMP also has criminal complaints against residential schools and staff over abuse.Assembly of First Nations chief Shawn Atleo called the court decision a victory.“This decision is a significant victory, and we will continue to stand in support of former students of the Indian Residential Schools and First Nations as the historical record of the Indian Residential School system will now be more complete and available to future generations,” said Atleo in a statement. “Reconciliation is about achieving real change that must come from increased and improved understanding of our shared history. These documents are essential to the truth-telling and truth-sharing work of the TRC, and all of us.”It’s believed more than 150,000 First Nation children were removed from their homes and placed in the schools that operated for nearly 150 years.last_img read more

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Ottawa minor football club Nepean Redskins bowed to pressure and agreed to change its name.The news comes weeks after a First Nation man filed a human rights complaint against the club, saying its name was racist and offensive.Ian Campeau, a member of A Tribe Called Red, spoke to APTN National News about his victory.last_img