Tag: 上海后花园

first_imgMichael Blygen’s hat-trick rescued Boys’ Town from embarrassment against lower leaguers Maxfield Park, in their Locker Room Sports KSAFA/Jackie Bell Knockout game at Collie Smith Complex yesterday.The home team surrendered a two-goal lead to the Major League outfit, which came back from two-nil down to level at 2-2. But two late goals from the former Tivoli Gardens striker saw the home team win 4-2.After a dour and goalless first half, Boys’ Town went in front just before the hour (59th) when Blygen flicked the ball over the Maxfield goalkeeper and it fell into the goal. Minutes later, Chavanney Willis made it 2-0 when he latched on to a through ball and slotted home.However, the visitors responded minutes later when Romaine Mullington was on the end of a good build-up to tap the ball past the Boys’ Town custodian. And before Boys’ Town realised what hit them, Nico Reynolds, Maxfield’s best player, equalised with a rasping shot from the edge of the box.Maxfield nearly went ahead in the 80th minute, but referee Carvel Banton adjudged that the ball had not crossed the goalline. Then on the counter, Boys’ Town went straight up field and Blygen capitalised on a loose ball to make it 3-2.The former Humble Lion and Rivoli player sealed the win two minutes from time when he broke away and calmly slotted home.Blygen spent the second-half of last season in the Dominican Republic, but missed most of that campaign through injury.”So far in the Premier League, things have been very disappointing. I hope this will be a stepping stone for me to get more playing time and deliver for my team and try to help them make the top four,” he said.”Last season, I joined Boys’ Town in January, then went on a trial overseas in Dominica Republic. I made the team and played three matches, but injury got the better of me. But this season I am back, so I am just taking it a step at a time and doing my best and see what happens.”So I hope this hat-trick gives coach more confidence in me because I have always worked hard, but the team has been up and down; we are not being consistent. So I hope that this is a stepping stone for me to get time on the pitch,” he reasoned.Coach Andrew Price is also hoping this is a turning point for his striker.”I hope that this will be a catalyst for him (Blygen) to assist us in the third round. Boys’ Town always play better football in the third round, and we are preparing ourselves assiduously to really make a good run and see where it leads us,” he declared.Yesterday’s resultsBarbican 1 UWI 0Waterhouse 2 Maverley/Hughenden 1Boys’ Town 4 Maxfield 2Today’s games3 p.m. August Town vs Bull Bay at UWI Mona Bowl3 p.m. Olympic Gardens vs Real Mona at Cling Cling Oval3 p.m. Rockfort vs Cavalier at Rockfort3 p.m. Cooreville Gardens vs Arnett Gardens at Duhaney Park7 p.m. Harbour View vs Tivoli Gardens at Harbour View Stadiumlast_img read more

first_imgLocation:Cayambe, EcuadorN 00° 00.000′ W 078° 10.500′ TraditionalGC56FKXby wen-go SharePrint RelatedNo Further South From Here — Geocache of the WeekJanuary 31, 2018In “Community”GCC#134 Little Red Riding Hood — Geocache of the WeekAugust 28, 2019In “Community”Hilma Hooker (GC2W056) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 7, 2016In “Community” Difficulty:1.5Terrain:1.5center_img N 00° 00.000′ W 078° 10.500′ —Aptly named, Ecuador straddles the equator where the southern and northern hemispheres meet. Exactly at latitude N 00° 00.000′, the Quitsato Sundial was the first monument of the Equator in the history of the Republic of Ecuador.The location features a 54 meter diameter platform  embellished with a mosaic of  river stones. The different shades of rock create an eight-pointed star, also known as a  compass rose that indicates solstices and equinoxes.At the center of the platform stands a giant 10-meter high sundial that can be used to tell time. This platform is also used to explain the albedo effect when the darker stones create higher temperatures from the absorption of sunlight. The cache takes you to a viewpoint to relax and absorb all this celestial knowledge. Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

first_imgKlopp deflects agent comments on Liverpool exit: It was German humour!by Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveJurgen Klopp has brushed off comments from his agent saying he could leave Liverpool because of the weather.The Liverpool manager’s agent Marc Kosicke suggested in a recent interview that Klopp could be tempted to switch Merseyside for a hotter destination.Speaking on the eve of Liverpool’s Champions League opener against Napoli, Klopp said: “There is nothing in that story.”He wanted to make a joke so now I have to be serious.”It is German humour but obviously nobody got it…I am completely fine with the weather.”Let me spell it out, the weather has never been a reason for me to choose a city and it’s certainly not a reason for me to leave the country.”Maybe at the moment (in England) it’s the most healthy weather in the world – we have enough rain, it’s cool, pretty much the opposite of this room!”There’s nothing in that story. He’s my agent and my friend.”When I speak about the weather it was about the wind which can have an effect on football, but that is not allowed in England. But that is not to a reason leave the country. I am fine.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgSrinagar: In a major operation, Jammu and Kashmir Police on Wednesday gunned down a top Lashkar-e-Taiba militant who was responsible for attacking a leading apple trader’s family in which a girl child had also been injured. Some policemen were also injured in the exchange of fire but are said to be out of danger. Asif Maqbool Bhat was killed in a brief shootout with the police and security forces in Sopore around 9 a.m. “When we intercepted Bhat today (Wednesday), he attacked us. He threw a grenade at us. A few police personnel were injured but they are out of danger. In the ensuing encounter, the militant was neutralised,” Director General of Police Dilbag Singh said in a press briefing. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details He said Bhat had attacked the family of Haji Hamidullah Rather, a prominent fruit grower of Sopore and a resident of Dangerpora area, on September 8. “The militant fired at the family members of Rather, injuring four of them including a girl aged between four and seven years. The girl is admitted here in a hospital. Other members of the family were also evacuated from that place.” The girl was Rather’s daughter Asma. Bhat, and his associates, had also shot and injured a migrant labourer, identified as Shafi Alam, the same day, the DGP added. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday “The injured boy has been brought to a Srinagar hospital. I am told that his condition is fine and he is likely to be discharge any moment.” Bhat was also responsible for making use of over ground workers (OGWs) to print and publish posters threatening people to stay away from the fruit business, not to open shops and refrain from normal day-to-day activities, he said. “We were watching those activities. We were after these people who are involved in this. Eight people who are indulging in this kind of activities were apprehended by Sopore police along with the computers and other equipment they were using for printing those threatening letters and pasting them at various locations.” The DGP said that Bhat, along with two other fellow militants Sajjad and Mudassar, was very active in the area over the last one month and had created a lot of terror. “They were roaming around in villages, going to the people and threatening them, telling them not to go for daily chores… So we were tracking him.” On a specific input, police, along with other security forces, laid some “nakas” (checkpoints) close to Sopore town, the DGP said, adding Bhat was challenged to stop when he came. “Bhat, however, did not stop and threw a grenade on our party in which couple of our police personnel were injured but they are out of danger. He was later neutralised in the encounter. “With the killing of of Bhat, I believe that the area will heave a sigh of relief. The terror which he was creating there would be taken care of to some extent. We also know his other two associates and we are after them. We will see it in the near future. We will take care of them,” he said. The elimination of the top LeT member comes two days after the police, along with the army and other security forces including the Central Reserve Police Force, busted a terror module of the LeT in the Sopore area with the arrest of eight militants. Sopore’s Senior Superintendent of Police Javaid Iqbal said the men had hatched a conspiracy to print posters threatening locals from venturing out of their homes, either for trade, travel, schools or office. They used to distribute these posters in local villages.last_img read more

first_imgThe berries tasted different. The blueberries and cranberries didn’t look the same either.When elders from Fort McKay near Alberta’s oilsands went to their traditional picking areas, things just didn’t feel right. They knew something was off. But what?The First Nation’s questions eventually grew into a collaboration with university-based researchers that brought botanists out on traditional berry-picking trips in an attempt to use western science to investigate community concerns.Sure enough, the elders were right. Berries closer to the oilsands were different.That effort to unite the white coats and the bush jackets was so successful that the Alberta government is extending the model into fish and wetland projects.“We have a lot of scientists working in the area, but they don’t always get to meet the elders and learn from them,” said Jenelle Baker, a botanist who helped direct the research. “A lot of the scientists that are doing that are having some pretty big, almost life-changing moments.”Reconciliation between Canada and First Nations is playing out not only in legislatures and courtrooms but in labs across the country. Research grant applications often require provision for what is called traditional ecological knowledge and Indigenous communities have a growing influence on what questions are explored.It isn’t always easy. Differences between science rooted in European ideas and the conceptual tools of Indigenous people are real and both parties still sometimes struggle for common ground.“Anything science can’t measure on the x and y axis, they tend to disregard,” said Elmer Ghostkeeper, an engineer, anthropologist and member of the Alberta government’s Indigenous Wisdom Advisory Panel — a group charged with bringing Indigenous perspectives to environmental monitoring.“Everything is about measurement and anything you can’t measure is not scientific,” said Leroy Little Bear, a University of Lethbridge professor and another panel member.On the other hand, individual experience and oral history isn’t always enough, said Andrew Derocher, a University of Alberta polar bear biologist with extensive field experience.“There’s been a push to try to move the traditional ecological knowledge into the science and that has not worked very well. They are two very different entities.“Traditional ecological knowledge isn’t feeding directly into the scientific questions that we have anymore.”Science isolates a variable, notes its behaviour under controlled conditions and extrapolates that into a general rule. The scientist stands apart, neutrally observing.Indigenous people have been more interested in relationships between many things at once as they interact in the real world. That real world includes the observer.“I am nature,” said Ghostkeeper. “I am the environment.”That perspective inevitably includes feelings and values — love for a place, for example. “Science can’t measure love,” Ghostkeeper said.But those feelings and values are real and they matter. In Fort McKay, they were what started the whole study.“They have subtler indicators of contamination,” Baker said. “Often, that involves symbolic, spiritual contamination.”Sometimes, science itself causes the contamination. Inuit have long objected to polar bear research that involves tranquilizing, handling and taking samples.“It is very disrespectful to the animal,” said Paul Irngaut of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., which monitors the Nunavut land claim. “It goes against our beliefs and it goes against our values.”And even in successful collaborations, Indigenous concerns sometimes leave scientists nonplussed, Baker said.“If we’re doing a traditional land-use assessment and we’re talking about the landscape, what happens when someone brings up the serpent that lives under the muskeg?”Still, both scientists and Indigenous leaders understand they have a lot to offer each other.“We welcome science,” said Irngaut. “It enhances our knowledge.”Derocher credits Inuit hunters with invaluable advice about bear behaviour and habitat.“We’re talking to people who have been on the land for decades,” he said.Fred Wrona, Alberta’s chief scientist, said Indigenous input has been at the heart of research programs he’s worked on.“It’s important for us, when we’re reporting on the condition of the environment, to understand the values of that environment,” he said. “It’s broadened my perspective. A classical western scientist, you tend to look at components in isolation from each other and try to understand all these pieces.“The Indigenous perspective has always reinforced the importance of understanding relationships between components of the environment.”Ultimately, western and Indigenous viewpoints may not be that far apart. Little Bear points to the findings of quantum physics, which conclude that the observer and the observed are part of the same system and that the only constant in the universe is flux.“A subatomic particle, isolated — which is the western approach to science — doesn’t have much meaning. It’s only when you take that particle and relate it to something else that it begins to have meaning.“We may measure. But we also have to relate.” — Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960Bob Weber, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgBOSTON BAR, B.C. – A Canadian National Railway freight train has jumped the tracks near Boston Bar, B.C.The railway’s Andy Cummings says 19 cars from the mixed freight train were involved in the derailment late Thursday.David Karn, a spokesman with B.C.’s Environmental Ministry, says none of the train cars were compromised and all remained upright.Cummings says the train was travelling on Canadian Pacific Railway tracks and no one was injured in the derailment.He says nothing was spilled or leaked into the waterway.Cummings says an internal investigation has begun into the derailment.Companies in this story: TSX:CNR, TSX:CPlast_img read more

first_imgVANCOUVER – Shares of Lululemon Athletica Inc. surged Friday after the company beat expectations in its latest results and increased its earnings outlook for the year.The company’s share price climbed US$17.14 or 16.32 per cent to close at US$122.19 on the Nasdaq to hit an all-time high.The stock rise came after the Vancouver-based clothing company reported net income of US$75.2 million in the quarter ending April 29, beating analyst expectations of US$61.3 million according to Thomson Reuters Eikon. It was also a big increase from the US$31.3 million for the same quarter last year.The yoga and athletic-focused retailer also increased its diluted earnings per share expectations to between US$3.10 and US$3.18 from the US$3 to US$3.08 it had forecast in March.The strong earnings come as the company reported sales growth in both its stores and online, including an eight per cent increase in comparable store sales and a 62 per cent increase in direct to consumer revenue which includes online sales.Retail analyst Neil Saunders says the online sales boost can be attributed to a relaunched website, while overall the company continues to innovate on products and has significant growth potential including with its menswear offerings.last_img read more

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – After eight days of mediated bargaining, between the B.C. Teachers Federation and the Province, the talks with the Teacher’s Federation has hit a snag.According to reports, a mediator says the two sides are too far apart to continue talking and that the school year will begin with the old contract in place.No new talks will be taking place until September 23. Earlier in the week, on August 28, Minister of Education Rob Fleming said he remained optimistic that a collective agreement would be made by the weekend.According to Teachers Federation President Teri Mooring, the two groups had been in discussions since January.The collective agreement between the Teacher’s Federation and the Province had expired June 30.School will start as normal on September 3.last_img read more

first_img‘Rest in Peace’ is a term much in popular use and is sighted characteristically on the social media portals. Whenever a known person departs for their heavenly abode, members of a particular social media group immediately take to expressing sorrow and grief and quote “RIP”. Thi has actually become a social ritual. But the person for whom this ‘RIP’ is being used has no effect from such expressions. One fails to understand what the actual usage of such expression is. Then why it is being used at all? The mind seeks an answer to this logical question. Also Read – A special kind of bondTo understand this aspect a little more in depth, one needs to understand the basics of the Sanatham Dharma which is largely in practice by the majority of people in this country. It is believed that there is only one great soul which is referred to as the “Paramatma”, the God, the Father. Each and every living creature is part of this God and ‘Atma’ present in each human and other living creatures are always eager to get attached to the ‘Parmatma’, whenever it leaves the physical form. The body is like the clothing which one keeps changing and the ‘Atma’ never dies, it never ceases to exist. Hindus and some other believers across the world subscribe to the notion of rebirth and reincarnation. At the end of one’s physical life graph, the balance sheet of the good and bad deeds decide the fate and the course of the next birth. More good deeds clocked by one during their lifetime means a better life in the following rebirth. It is directly proportional to the quality of the next life. It is the effect of ‘Karma’. Human life is the supreme one among all living beings. The ultimate ‘Moksha’ can only be attained through human life. ‘Moksha’ refers to the end of the life cycle when the soul is permanently attached to Parmatama and finally merges it with. There is no reversal here, no rebirth that one must undertake after the Moksha is attained. India is a land of Rishis, Munis, and Sadhus and noble souls always thriving to attain Moksha. Kaliyug (the age we are living in today) makes room for some dilution of the spiritual values. Nevertheless, spiritually elated people in each and every city, town, and villages of India are constantly seeking the ultimate Moksha and leading a simple and spiritually rich life towards achieving the main aim to attain Moksha by means of ‘Tapasya’. Also Read – Insider threat management”Hinduism” is arguably the oldest socio-religious way and dictum to lead life. It is rather a way of life more than a religion and is followed by Christianity and Islam. Unlike Hinduism where after death, the body the dead is burned, in Christianity and Islam, it is buried. In Hinduism, it is believed that as soon as the heart stops, the soul or the “Atma” leaves the body and gets attached to the ‘Parmatma’ or God. In Christianity and Islam, a person’s dead body is buried and both these faiths don’t believe in rebirth. Thus, the ‘Rest In Piece’ concept evolved with burial practiced in Christianity and Islam. Adaptation and exchange of good values across faiths and religious systems will improve the quality of life and enrich it. At the same time, it is to be remembered that such an exchange should not dilute or erase one’s own values or hurt one’s faith which should not be overshadowed by such adaptations. So, RIP all faiths and religions without blurring the basic tenets of one another! (The writer is a senior Veteran Officer of IAF, and former Additional Director General, Prasar Bharti. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

141610.20 132040.80 That kind of normalcy is not why we tune in to the tournament! Annoyed that I watched 12 consecutive hours of basketball with so little chaos to show for it, I started to wonder whether we have overblown expectations of unpredictability in March Madness. Are most days actually like Thursday, but we only remember the last-second shots and the scrappy Cinderellas?No — Thursday really was different. The first day of March Madness was anything but mad. Better-seeded teams went 14-2 on the day, and even the “surprises” were relatively easy to see coming: The higher-seeded teams’ two losses came at the hands of Middle Tennessee State (the South’s No. 12 seed) and Xavier (No. 11 in the West), both of which were among the most popular upset picks of the first round. (Our March Madness predictions had each game as a toss-up.) All told, the NCAA hadn’t seen a chalkier opening day since 2000, when the superior seeds went 15-1 after the tournament launched.VIDEO: A No. 16 seed will win, but don’t bet on it SEEDEXPECTED UPSET RATEGAMESEXPECTED UPSETSACTUAL UPSETS 15610.10 16020.00 123641.41 Expected upset rates are based on winning percentage in all first-round games for each seed from 1985-2016.Source: Sports-Reference.com 103910.40 OPENING DAY 2017 950%21.00 Total164.22 March Madness tipped off with a dose of sanity 113610.41 This year featured 2.2 fewer upsets than expected, which makes it second only to 2000 in terms of uneventful opening days during the tournament’s 64-team era. To get those numbers, I looked at the historical upset rates for each seed,1Starting in 1985, when the NCAA tournament expanded to a 64-team bracket, and going through 2016. taking into account which games were played on Thursday.But despite their disappointing record, underdogs kept the score relatively close in 2017’s opening-day games. In terms of average scoring margin, this year tied for the ninth-most-respectable showing by worse-seeded teams on an opening day of the tournament — on par with days where fans saw six or seven upsets.In other words, a lucky bounce here or there could have made all the difference for Thursday’s long shots. Maybe that means good, old-fashioned madness will be restored to its rightful place on Day 2 of the tourney. Then again, analyzing other second-day games using the same method as above suggests that Friday should be less upset-y (3.9 expected upsets) than Thursday was supposed to be. Somebody free us from this prison of predictability! read more