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first_img View this post on Instagram Where else would you go to celebrate your birthday 🎂 … @sheeshchigwell #thebestaround A post shared by @ katekanex on Jan 23, 2020 at 10:43am PSTThree Lions skipper Kane looked like his season was over when he ruptured his hamstring as Jose Mourinho’s side opened 2020 with a defeat at St Mary’s.The last four and a half months are the longest Kane, 26, has gone without playing football during his whole career.But he is now raring to go and he is desperate to add to his 11 Premier League goals — if and when the top flight finally returns.In an exclusive interview aired on talkSPORT today, Kane admitted that, even in the stark reality of a global pandemic, he is trying to make the best of a challenging situation.MOST READ IN FOOTBALLTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’PicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidNEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticNICE RONCristiano Ronaldo goes on family bike ride with partner Georgina Rodriguez & kidsKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for himREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidLive Blogunited newsMan Utd news LIVE – Latest updates from Old TraffordHe said: “I’ve been able to spend a bit more time with my family, with my kids, time I wouldn’t normally get during my career.“We are normally full-on all year round, so I’ve been trying to take the positives from a bad situation and trying to make the most of what’s going on. The training I’ve been doing on my own has been good.“I’ve been able to really train and work on specific things. When we do continue, hopefully I’ll be ready.” HARRY KANE cannot wait to start chasing his first goal of the decade if the Premier League resumes next month.The Tottenham striker is facing his longest ever spell out — almost six months — but fit again after surgery, Kane said: “Just the feeling of getting back out on the pitch again, with fans or without fans, will be so challenging — and I just can’t wait to do it.1“I got injured on January 1, so whenever we start playing again it’s going to be at least six months before I play another game, which is a very long time.”The England striker injured his hamstring in Tottenham’s 1-0 defeat at Southampton on New Year’s Day.Since then English football has gone through the wringer after being suspended since March 13 due to the coronavirus.But Premier League stars have been given the green light to return to training this week.They are bidding to follow their counterparts in the Bundesliga — which resumed at the weekend with top-flight German matches behind closed doors. View this post on Instagram Missed this 😍 A post shared by Harry Kane (@harrykane) on May 16, 2020 at 3:20am PDTlast_img read more

first_img | Unpick Share Share Report ‘“Don’t worry mama,” she told me, “so many people make it. I’ll be fine, I’ll make it.” But she wasn’t fine, she never got to realize her dream of working in the United States.’ Photograph: Johan Ordóñez/AFP/Getty Images 1 2 Twitter ‘I want justice’: a year on, family of Guatemalan woman shot dead in Texas wait for answers Comments 14 expanded Share on Twitter Read more Facebook Facebook Twitter 1 2 Share on Facebook Gómez decided to migrate to try to fill the economic gap left by her father’s deportation.She left home on 7 May 2018 with a local guide, or coyote, against the wishes of her mother and grandmother who worried about the dangerous overland passage through Mexico. “‘Don’t worry mama,’ she told me, ‘so many people make it. I’ll be fine, I’ll make it.’“But she wasn’t fine, she never got to realize her dream of working in the United States,” said González.Claudia arrived in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on the evening of 22 May 2018 – two weeks after leaving home – where she was taken to a so-called safe house full of Guatemalans waiting to cross the border to the US. From here, she phoned home; it’s a call her mother has replayed over and over in her head this past year.“She sounded happy, excited because they were going to cross that night or in the morning. She told me not to worry, that she’d soon be at her aunt’s in Atlanta, and would call me then.”Claudia crossed Rio Grande with five young men on 23 May around 11 or 11.30am, and entered a small abandoned building to wait for the next guide.The Guardian spoke to several of these youngsters, who asked not to be named in order to protect the continuing investigation. They quickly left the building and hid among some bushes further uphill after catching sight of an armed patrol agent. Comments on this piece are premoderated to ensure discussion remains on topics raised by the writer. Please be aware there may be a short delay in comments appearing on the site. Guardian Pick | Pick Facebook It’s not “shoot first and ask questions later”. It’s “shoot first and ask no questions at all”. Twitter Read more This story is such a heartbreaker. I’m so sorry for their loss. When the US militarized the border and linked it to the national imagination this was inevitable. Americas Twitter 23 May 2019 Claudia Patricia Gómez González. Photograph: Courtesy Gonzalez family San Juan Ostuncalco is a picturesque rural sprawl of mostly indigenous Mam communities scattered amid fertile mountains outside Guatemala’s second largest city, Quetzaltenango.This region was the setting for multiple atrocities by government forces during the country’s 36-year civil war that left 200,000 civilians dead – most of them indigenous – and triggered a wave of forced migration to the US in the 1980s.More recently, those refugees have been followed by a new generation of migrants, driven from home by economic hardship, climate change, government neglect and endemic corruption. In 2018, Guatemalans living abroad sent home a record $9.2bn in remittances, accounting for 11% of the country’s GDP.Claudia Gómez graduated in 2016 with an accounting certificate, and the smart youngster hoped to continue studying but didn’t pass the tough entrance exam for a place at the country’s only public university. Then, in August 2017, her father was deported after several years working as an electrician in Atlanta. As a result, the family could not afford to send her to a private university. Keeping the family’s two younger children in school also became a struggle. | Pick Facebook Support The Guardian Guardian Pick Share Guatemala Jump to comment Guardian Pick Dear Lidia and Gilberto, my heart is broken for your loss. There is no sane reason for Claudia’s death. I am horrified by the lack of action and consideration on the part of my country. Please know that I hold you all in my heart. Vaya con dios. Comments on this piece are premoderated to ensure discussion remains on topics raised by the writer. Please be aware there may be a short delay in comments appearing on the site. | Pick Share on Facebook Dear Lidia and Gilberto, my heart is broken for your loss. There is no sane reason for Claudia’s death. I am horrified by the lack of action and consideration on the part of my country. Please know that I hold you all in my heart. Vaya con dios. gracedwheels 23 May 2019 Share on Twitter features Twitter 23 May 2019 15:02 Jump to comment Report AnglophileDe Pinterest Reply 2 3 Jump to comment Guns Guns Guns, I hope some day very soon the guns become history. Share on Twitter | Unpick Report Facebook Jump to comment 0 1 Pinterest … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. CommunityMod Guardian Pick Share on Messenger Cobberthedog 23 May 2019 0 1 Guardian Pick Share on Facebook Twitter Facebook elboberto elboberto 1 2 Order by oldest newest Reply Reply Reply Every Monday morning, after their two youngest daughters go to school, Gilberto Gómez and Lidia González trek to a brightly colored hillside cemetery to lay fresh flowers at their eldest daughter’s grave.“Claudia Patricia Gómez González died in the United States on 23 May 2018 searching for the American dream … your death has left an emptiness in our home”, reads the engraving on the tombstone.Claudia, a 20-year-old indigenous woman from western Guatemala, was shot in the head by a border patrol agent in Rio Bravo, Texas, just minutes after crossing the border.A year on, and her parents still have no idea who killed her, or why.“We’ve had no news from the American authorities, no visits, no phone calls. It’s a year since my daughter was killed and I want the same thing now as I did then: justice,” Mr Gómez, 40, told the Guardian. Fatal encounters: 97 deaths point to pattern of border agent violence across America Twitter All Share on Facebook Facebook Report 23 May 2019 9:13 0 1 Reply Share on Facebook Wed 22 May 2019 02.00 EDT Share 0 1 hsnriflejkejh Share They need to retain an attorney and bring suit in federal court promptly. The discovery process will allow them a chance to review the documents and other evidence as well as question people and representatives of the agency about the incident but it takes time and often alot of pulling teeth. Waiting at this point could jeopardize the process of locating and questioning witnesses before their recollections get worse or they disappear and become impossible to locate. Share on Facebook 2 3 0 1 | Unpick | Unpick Report Share Facebook Cobberthedog Report Lots of money needed to do that. From where? Another video filmed by Martinez, but not broadcast, was handed over to federal investigators.The migrants interviewed by the Guardian denied having sticks or rocks, and said Claudia was unarmed, timid and scared.The three detained men, who met Claudia and each other at the safe house in Nuevo Laredo, spent over five months locked up in various detention centers waiting to testify.At the end of October last year, tired of incarceration, they opted to be deported home and return to testify in the US, if a criminal charge is brought against the agent. The FBI investigation remains ongoing, and agents have been in contact with the witnesses, but the family have heard nothing.The FBI did not respond to the Guardian’s request for an update on the case, nor did CBP.A Guardian investigation published three weeks before Gómez was killed found that CBP agents used deadly force on at least 97 people since 2003. Six Guatemalan children and adolescents have died trying to reach the US since Gómez died in May 2018.A year on, and her parents want answers – and justice.“We still don’t know the name of the person who killed my daughter. We don’t know if he’s in jail or still working. We don’t know why he killed her,” said González.Mr Gómez added: “We pray to god that the guilty man is sent to jail and pays for what he did. And we hope that the Americans stop killing migrants.” Guardian Pick 23 May 2019 10:48 oldest 1 2 Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter Facebook Share via Email Loading comments… Trouble loading? MigueldeCervantes Reply daver60 Share 0 1 Share Report Twitter Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other 23 May 2019 Twitter Staffcenter_img Reuse this content,View all comments > Anna Miller 23 May 2019 11:56 Staff Share on Facebook Twitter Cobberthedog Report Share on Twitter elboberto Facebook Reply recommendations Anna Miller elboberto Share on Facebook Share via Email This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Facebook comments (14)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Facebook Honestly, The US owes nothing, with all of the border disputes, drama, crap, that’s been going on, Immigrants from Cuba, Quatamala, Central-South America, Europe, Asia and wherever else, were warned about the US not accepting any refugees or immigrants, Why not place blame where it’s due? If a parent tells a child not to touch a hot stove and they touched it, who’s fault is it? the stove’s? com’n people think smart, it’s the same thing about wanting to sue McDonald’s for burning themselves with hot coffee when clearly there are warnings about hot coffee… FOR THOSE that want to complain about better lifestyles here in America, if they’re (immigrants and refugees) really want to make a difference and a change, stand up for yourselves in your own country, is that so hard, might be at first, true, but if enough momentum gets started, well look at America now. If those immigrants that are looking for a handout, for the American People, how would you feel if the government stripped your children of their education or civil rights and handed them to an undeserving immigrant or refugee that has contributed to America? collapsed 25 Facebook 23 May 2019 Share on Twitter Reply 25 May 2019 8:15 | Pick Actually, it isn’t. Share on WhatsApp Report 50 Share on Twitter Reply gracedwheels People attend the wake of Claudia Patricia Gómez González in the village of Los Mendoza in western Guatemala last year.Photograph: Johan Ordóñez/AFP/Getty Images,Claudia Gómez, 20, was shot in the head by a border patrol agent in Rio Bravo, Texas, just minutes after crossing the borderby Nina Lakhani in San Juan Ostuncalco,Main image:People attend the wake of Claudia Patricia Gómez González in the village of Los Mendoza in western Guatemala last year.Photograph: Johan Ordóñez/AFP/Getty Images Report 23 May 2019 11:31 If no punishment arises from killing or abusing migrants, it’ll just get worse and more frequent. At this point, I’m not sure who would join Border Patrol or ICE unless they’re on board with the Trump administration’s agenda. And if they also know that they’ll be protected if they murder a migrant? Seems like a blank check for people with bad aims. US immigration | Pick Share on Pinterest 0 1 Pinterest Jump to comment Over the next few minutes, two of the migrants ran, got over a nearby fence, and kept running. Shortly after, two more ran towards an abandoned trailer – leaving Claudia and one other – when they heard a single shot.“I thought the agent had fired in the air to scare us, I went back a little way, but couldn’t see anything, so kept running,” one youngster told the Guardian.A couple of minutes later, an agent entered the trailer. “He was very angry. He was holding his weapon with both hands, pointing it straight at us, and said [in Spanish] we had one opportunity to leave.” Share on Twitter Topics Last modified on Wed 22 May 2019 20.36 EDT Share on Twitter daver60 They need to retain an attorney and bring suit in federal court promptly. The discovery process will allow them a chance to review the documents and other evidence as well as question people and representatives of the agency about the incident but it takes time and often alot of pulling teeth. Waiting at this point could jeopardize the process of locating and questioning witnesses before their recollections get worse or they disappear and become… Shame on the US border patrol for all their cloak-and-dagger shoot first ask questions later approach. My sincere sympathies to the Gómez family on their loss and the non-existent help from American authorities. I hope they find justice and the border patrol agent is help accountable. May Claudia RIP. Share 0 1 Report Share on Facebook 23 May 2019 11:20 Reply Share on Twitter unthreaded Close report comment form | Pick Reply Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Shame on the US border patrol for all their cloak-and-dagger shoot first ask questions later approach. My sincere sympathies to the Gómez family on their loss and the non-existent help from American authorities. I hope they find justice and the border patrol agent is help accountable. May Claudia RIP. CommunityMod Share Report Share View more comments Twitter elboberto Shares504504 Since you’re here… Share on LinkedIn 24 May 2019 2:15 If no punishment arises from killing or abusing migrants, it’ll just get worse and more frequent. At this point, I’m not sure who would join Border Patrol or ICE unless they’re on board with the Trump administration’s agenda. And if they also know that they’ll be protected if they murder a migrant? Seems like a blank check for people with bad aims. Share 24 May 2019 22:21 Report DougInToronto Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 23 May 2019 11:34 The pair came out, were handcuffed, and led down to awaiting patrol cars where they saw numerous people in different uniforms including paramedics. The youngster who was with Claudia when she was shot was also detained.Initially, the CBP said that a lone agent fired in self-defense after a group of undocumented migrants resisted arrest and attacked him with blunt objects, describing Claudia as one of the “assailants”.But the official story changed after a live broadcast of the aftermath of the fatal incident by neighbor, Marta Martinez, went viral. In the video, filmed by Martinez on her cellphone, she is repeatedly heard asking agents why they shot a young woman. “Why did you kill that woman? You killed her!” Martinez is heard saying. “I saw you with the gun.”Two days later, CBP issued another statement, which said a 15-year veteran of the border patrol had been “allegedly assaulted” and “rushed”, and did not mention blunt objects. Guardian Pick ‘Claudia was a good girl. Why did they kill her?’ From a Guatemalan village to death in Texas Show 25 elboberto Facebook Share Maybe boarder control is different but alot of agencies don’t press too far beyond the surface explanations in these situations. If the family want real answers they will almost definitely need to seek them on their own. antking Share on Twitter 1 2 Twitter Threads collapsed Share on Facebook 23 May 2019 21:48 100 Guardian Pick Reply ‘Claudia Patricia Gómez González died in the United States on 23 May 2018 searching for the American dream … your death has left an emptiness in our home.’ Photograph: Nina Lakhani Guardian Pick Facebook Guardian Pick Twitter Share on Twitter 0 1 23 May 2019 10:27 25 May 2019 5:05 Email (optional) Twitter | Unpick 0 1 | Pick Reply Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Moving piece, especially considering this piece from the New Republic I read this morning: https://newrepublic.com/article/153977/trump-presidency-will-live-infamy | Pick 1 2 Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp JediJames Share on Twitter Reason (optional) 23 May 2019 8:41 Report Share on Twitter Share on Facebooklast_img read more