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first_imgFalse and misleading information surging in battleground states that have become the focus of the political battle — including Arizona, Pennsylvania, Nevada and Georgia; No, Sharpies didn’t invalidate votes in Arizona. Republicans looking to cast doubts on the legitimacy of election results in the state circulated a conspiracy theory that alleged that poll workers had provided Trump voters with felt-tip pens to mark their ballots, which some claimed invalidated those ballots by making them unreadable by voting machines. Multiple Arizona officials said that there was no truth to that claim, and that votes with felt-tip pens were counted. [The New York Times] Could state legislatures pick electors to vote for Trump? It is not likely. Election law experts are highly skeptical. And leaders of the Republican majorities in legislatures in key states, including Pennsylvania, Michigan, Arizona and Georgia, said they saw no role for themselves in picking electors. [The New York Times] I spoke with Renee DiResta, a disinformation researcher at the Stanford Internet Observatory, who told me she was worried about three specific themes around election misinformation: Today’s newsletter is a dispatch from our colleagues in the tech bureau who have been covering the spread of disinformation in the aftermath of the election. First this from Davey Alba:President Trump’s steadfast refusal to acknowledge that Joseph R. Biden Jr. won the presidential election, along with his continual statements containing unfounded claims that the election was rigged, has left a huge information gap ripe for exploitation by bad actors, disinformation researchers have told me. And that has led to the worst-case scenario for the proliferation of misinformation about the election playing out: The volume of bad information, they say, is unprecedented.- Advertisement – Can Mr. Trump still win? No. He’s already lost. Mr. Trump has repeatedly said that he “will win.” This is false. Mr. Biden’s winning margins in the key battleground states he has captured are well above the thresholds of votes that have been changed in previous recounts. [The New York Times] – Advertisement – The re-emergence of misinformation incidents and delegitimization themes that pointed back to earlier allegations — ideas that a Democrat-led coup would take place, voting machines being tainted, and more. – Advertisement – As my colleagues Jim Rutenberg and Nick Corasaniti reported on Sunday, the roots of Mr. Trump’s approach — to cast doubt on the outcome of the vote — dates to before his election in 2016, and he advanced his plans throughout his term. But it took shape in earnest when the coronavirus pandemic upended normal life and led states to promote voting by mail.To be sure, misinformation of all kinds, not just about the election, had already been on the rise, compounded by the pandemic and stay-at-home orders that have caused more people to be glued to their screens and consuming social media.But a lot of it was tied to politics in one form or another. There was a surge in followers of the QAnon conspiracy, whose convoluted theory falsely claims that a cabal of Satan-worshiping, pedophile Democrats is plotting against President Trump. The Wall Street Journal recently reported that the average membership in 10 large public QAnon Facebook groups swelled almost 600 percent from March through July. The repurposing of user-created content from Election Day, which documented one-off incidents, aggregated to support claims of fraud and illegitimacy; “These narratives are reaching audiences inclined to believe them, and so a significant concern remains around whether the losing side will accept the legitimacy of the outcome,” Ms. DiResta said.A lot of the claims are not new, with just the specifics updated. Indeed, I can’t tell you how many misinformation themes have been recycled in this period. Unsubstantiated rumors of dead people voting emerged early on in Michigan; the same rumor happened in Pennsylvania, only the supposed fraud was now at a much larger scale, including tens of thousands of people. Then the claims of voter fraud morphed into an unfounded accusation about impostors using maiden names to steal votes. Claims of ballots being magically lost or found, or being burned, or being carted into vote-counting sites by unauthorized people soared.For some solid advice on how to keep levelheaded in this period, especially coming out of this weekend, when protests about the election results were held, I would suggest listening to Nina Jankowicz, a disinformation analyst at the Wilson Center, a nonpartisan think tank. She recommended trying to tune out politicians and political pundits for the time being, especially when you feel yourself starting to have a strong emotional response to social media posts.“I would recommend some ‘informational distancing’ — walk away from your device for a little while and if that information is still bugging you in a few minutes go and do some lateral reading,” Ms. Jankowicz said. “Figure out if anyone else is reporting what you’ve seen, and look at those official sources to see if they corroborate what you’ve just read or watched.”Stay safe out there in the internet seas, dear readers.Here from Joe Plambeck are some false and misleading rumors spreading about the election, and the truth behind the claims. No, Dominion voting machines did not delete Trump votes. President Trump last week spread new baseless claims that “glitches” in software made by Dominion Voting Systems changed vote tallies in Michigan and Georgia. The Dominion software was used in only two of the five counties that had problems in those states, and in every instance there was a detailed explanation for what had happened. In all of the cases, software did not affect the vote counts. [The New York Times] There is no proof that people stole maiden names to vote. The claim that unauthorized people had cast votes under the maiden names of real voters spread widely last week, much of it under the hashtag #MaidenGate. But there is no evidence behind those accusations. [The New York Times] – Advertisement –last_img read more

first_imgPill draw is $25 for the Modifieds, $20 for both Stock Cars and Northern SportMods, and $10 for Hobby Stocks.  IMCA Modifieds run for $1,000 to win, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods for $750 to win, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars for $500 to win and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks for $250 to win at Saturday and Sunday, Jan 26 and 27 and Feb. 2 and 3 shows. Open practice sessions start at 7 p.m. Fridays Jan. 25 and Feb. 1. Practice night pit passes are $20 and under 11 are free with a notarized minor release form.  Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot berths are also at stake each night for the Modifieds. IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, state and special series, but no track points, will be given all four nights. Larry Shaw Race Cars Western Region points will also be awarded to Modifieds, EQ Cylinder Heads Southern Region points to Stock Cars and Big Daddy Race Cars Southern Region points to Hobby Stocks.  Pit gates will be open throughout both weekends and camping is available. Grandstands open at 11 a.m. and racing begins at 1 p.m. Pit passes are $35 for adults, $20 for kids ages 7-11 and free for six and under. All minors need a notarized minor release form filled out. The form is available on the Canyon Speedway Park website.  PEORIA, Ariz. – Four IMCA sanctioned divisions are on race programs each night of the Winter Challenge Series at Canyon Speedway Park.  Spectator admission is $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and military, and free for kids 11 and under. More information is available at the www.canyonspeedwaypark.com website or by calling 602 258-7223.last_img read more

first_img Johnson was the next to come close as he beat the offside trap to latch on to Allen’s long ball into the Palace box, but the England international could only guide a header over Julian Speroni’s crossbar. With Liverpool in the ascendancy, the opening goal came on 18 minutes as the returning Sturridge saw a curled effort deflected behind off Delaney for a corner. Allen found himself in space to head the resulting set-piece back across Speroni and put the visitors ahead on his 50th league appearance for the club. Jason Puncheon, Palace’s top scorer, forced Simon Mignolet into his first save of the evening shortly afterwards as his low drive nicked off Sakho, the Liverpool goalkeeper turning the ball behind for a corner. Mile Jedinak was the next man to test the Belgium international as he arrowed a long-range shot towards the top corner, only to see Mignolet equal to it once again as he tipped the goal-bound effort over. Pushing forward did leave Palace susceptible to Liverpool’s counter-attacking threat and Suarez almost doubled their lead after good work from Gerrard and Allen found the Uruguayan inside the penalty area, with his low shot tipped away by Speroni. The Argentinian was on hand again early in the second half to tip a bending Sturridge effort on to the post, with Suarez smashing the follow-up high and wide with a rare lack of composure. If goal difference is to decide where the title goes for the second time in three seasons, Liverpool soon looked to make a dent in City’s advantage. Gerrard, looking to put his vital slip in the defeat to Chelsea behind him, picked out Sturridge with a sumptuous pass and his England colleague controlled the ball with aplomb before his deflected shot found its way into the bottom corner. Just two minutes after his strike partner had scored, Suarez was on the end of another free-flowing attack, poking home past Speroni after being found by Raheem Sterling. Sterling himself saw two shots blocked in quick succession as he looked to add a fourth. But it was Palace who pulled a goal back with a little over 10 minutes to go as Delaney let fly with a speculative long-range effort which beat Mignolet courtesy of a deflection off Johnson. That goal seemed to unnerve the visitors and they were soon only a goal to the good as Yannick Bolasie burst through at speed and calmly picked out Gayle, who turned the ball home to bring Palace right back into the game. A memorable comeback was completed in the 88th minute as fellow substitute Glenn Murray chested the ball past Martin Skrtel and into the path of Gayle, who showed great composure to slide a shot under Mignolet to level proceedings. Liverpool pushed forward in the five minutes of additional time but could not find a winning goal and will now be relying on favours from both Villa on Wednesday night and West Ham on Sunday if they are to win a 19th league title. With title rivals Manchester City winning at Everton on Saturday, the pressure was on Brendan Rodgers and his side as they travelled to Selhurst Park needing all three points to maintain any realistic chance of ending their 24-year wait for a league crown. Everything seemed to be in order as the visitors charged into a three-goal lead befitting of their domination of the game, before the Eagles mounted a spirited comeback to score three in nine minutes and seal a memorable draw. City had strolled to victory in south London eight days ago but Palace did not roll over as easily against Liverpool, who now hold just a one-point advantage at the top of the table with City’s game in hand coming at home to Aston Villa on Wednesday night. Joe Allen’s first Liverpool goal was enough to give the Reds a half-time lead, with fit-again Daniel Sturridge and double player of the year Luis Suarez scoring in two early second-half minutes. But Palace have been instilled with a workmanlike attitude under Tony Pulis and, with the backing of a ferocious home crowd, miraculously clawed their way back into the game. Substitute Dwight Gayle was the main protagonist as the hosts followed Liverpool’s example by snatching two quick-fire goals. Damien Delaney’s first goal of the season started the charge before Gayle took centre stage, bagging a brace as Palace scored three in nine incredible minutes to take a share of the spoils and leave the likes of Suarez and Liverpool captain Steve Gerrard haunched over in anguish at the full-time whistle. It was a lively opening from Palace, buoyed on by a home crowd celebrating their top-flight survival, but the visitors soon took control of possession, slowly quietening those supporters looking to enjoy a final home game of the season. Glen Johnson felt he should have been awarded an early penalty after a wild swing at the ball from Yannick Bolasie saw the Palace winger catch him on the thigh. Mamadou Sakho then wasted the first decent chance of the game as he was picked out unmarked from a Gerrard corner but could only head into the ground and well wide. Liverpool’s ambitions of winning the Barclays Premier League suffered a huge blow on Monday night as they relinquished a three-goal lead to only come away with a 3-3 draw at Crystal Palace. Press Associationlast_img read more