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first_img(Visited 253 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 How can scientists and reporters write articles on “evolution” when evidence shows organisms died or didn’t change?What’s going on here? Frequently, evolutionists classify papers and articles as being about “evolution” when the evidence is opposite of evolution. Darwin needs life to evolve from bacteria to human beings. He doesn’t need them to stay the same or die out. What’s evolution got to do with it?Deep Macroevolutionary Impact of Humans on New Zealand’s Unique Avifauna (Current Biology). Humans have devastated birds on the New Zealand islands. Three Darwinists talk about it, and prognosticate about how long it would take for the island nation to recover. Phys.org summarizes their thoughts:Using computers to simulate a range of human-induced extinction scenarios, the researchers found that it would take approximately 50 million years to recover the number of species lost since human’s first arrived in New Zealand. If all species currently under threat are allowed to go extinct, they report, it would require about 10 million years of evolutionary time to return to the species numbers of today.Now, wait a cotton-pickin’ minute here: the only data these evolutionists have is the number of birds that have gone extinct since the first humans landed on the shore. What do they mean it would take 50 million years to recover, and another 10 million years if the endangered species go extinct? Oh, that’s it: that’s how much “evolutionary time” would have to pass for Charlie to invent new birds to fill in the gaps left by the dead. Well, ain’t that convenient! These Darwinians will be long gone before anyone can hold them accountable for telling a fib (see confabulation and confibulation in the Darwin dictionary).Extinction and the temporal distribution of macroevolutionary bursts (bioRxiv). This preprint mentions “macroevolutionary bursts” in the title, but the actual evidence talks about extinction and the “paradox of stasis.” Readers shouldn’t care about “microevolution,” because that is not controversial to creationists. They want Darwinians to come up with evidence of macroevolution – large-scale change. They want organisms to climb tall “adaptive peaks” on the fitness landscape, and turn into wondrous new things. They want to see the evolution of new phyla, orders, classes and families. Where is it?Phenotypic evolution through deep time is slower than expected from microevolutionary rates. This is the paradox of stasis. Previous models suggest stasis occurs because populations track adaptive peaks that typically move on million-year intervals, raising the equally perplexing question of why peaks shifts are so rare. Here, we consider the possibility that peaks can move more rapidly than populations can adapt, resulting in extinction. We model peak movement with explicit population dynamics, parameterized with published microevolutionary parameters. Allowing extinction greatly increases the parameter space of peak movements that yield the appearance of stasis observed in real data through deep time. Our work highlights population ecology as an important contributor to macroevolutionary dynamics, presenting an alternative perspective on the paradox of stasis where apparent constraint on phenotypic evolution in deep time reflects our restricted view of the subset of earth’s lineages that were fortunate enough to reside on relatively stable peaks.Did anyone see macroevolution pass by in this paragraph? No; Darwin floated by like a will-o’-the-wisp, a ghost, an imaginary figure threading through a forest of stasis and extinction. Oh, but in unobservable “deep time,” Stuff Happens.Death is on Our Side: Paleontological Data Drastically Modify Phylogenetic Hypotheses (bioRxiv). Here’s another preprint by Darwinians that glorifies death as a means of evolution. Two authors, Koch and Parry, think that their fellow Darwinians have tried to trace Darwinian progress by looking at the living. They need to study the dead. But actually, how clearly do dead things show macroevolution?Fossils are the only remaining evidence of the majority of species that have ever existed, providing a direct window into events in evolutionary history that shaped the diversification of life on Earth. Phylogenies underpin our ability to make sense of evolution but are routinely inferred only from data available from living organisms. Although extinct taxa have been shown to add crucial information for inferring macroevolutionary patterns and processes including ancestral states, paleobiogeography and diversification dynamics, the role that fossils play in inferring the tree of life itself is controversial. Since the early years of phylogenetic systematics, different studies have dismissed the impact of fossils due to their incompleteness, championed their ability to overturn phylogenetic hypotheses or concluded that their behavior is indistinguishable from that of extant taxa.So far they have discredited the ability to fossils to inform evolution! Can Darwinism be rescued from this evidence?Here we show paleontological data has a remarkable effect in phylogenetic inference. Fossils often have higher levels of topological influence than extant taxa, while inducing unique topological rearrangements. Previous studies have proposed a suite of explanations for the topological behavior of fossils, such as their retention of unique morphologies or their ability to break long branches. We develop predictive models that demonstrate that the possession of distinctive character state combinations is the primary predictor of the degree of induced topological change, and that the relative impact of taxa (fossil and extant) can be predicted to some extent before any analysis. Our results bolster the consensus of recent empirical studies by showing the unique role of paleontological data in phylogenetic inference, and provide the first quantitative assessment of its determinants, with broad consequences for the design of taxon sampling in both morphological and total-evidence analyses.Well, if you expect their promises to be fulfilled, you will be shocked that macroevolution is only mentioned one more time in the paper– and that just in passing, with no evidence to back it up. They say nothing about fitness, novelty, innovation or any other notion of positive selection leading to something new and different. Like most Darwinians, they just assume evolution occurred from all the things that went extinct. In the end, they only hope that more analysis of fossils might help solve the contradictions between molecular and paleontological tree-making (phylogenetic inference). By the way, when they say “Death is on Our Side,” to what side are they referring? Apparently, the side of Darwin storytellers.Causes and Consequences of Pleistocene Megafaunal Extinctions as Revealed from Rancho La Brea Mammals (Current Biology). This paper does not discuss macroevolution specifically, but it does try to explain why some predators died out (i.e., saber-tooth cats) and others survived (like coyotes). It does, however, discuss “adaptation” (often a synonym for Darwinian evolution), and extinction is once again the hero of the evolutionary plot. The press release about Larisa DeSantis from Vanderbilt University explains.It’s likely that those giant predators went extinct due to climate change, the arrival of humans to their environment or a combination of the two, she said, and her team is working to clarify the cause of the extinction with multiple colleagues across six institutions as part of a separate on-going study.What they know is predators alive today in the Americas were better able to adapt their diets. Instead of only feeding on large prey, they could effectively hunt small mammals, scavenge what they could from carcasses or do both.DeSantis conveniently leaves her options open. Extinction occurred because of climate change, or the arrival of humans, or a combination of the two. Cats preferred the forest, but wolves and coyotes preferred the plains, but their hunting grounds did overlap. Coyotes lasted because they learned to be opportunistic, surviving on predation and scavenging, or on human pets and trash cans. But wait; there are still mountain lions in California. DeSantis performs micro-divination on tooth samples to come up with a story that is little better than a post-hoc rationalization for the observable facts: some survived, others went extinct.Specifically, the cougar (Puma concolor), which survived the extinction event, consumed both flesh and bones with clear evidence of scavenging, in stark contrast to the extinct American lion (Panthera atrox) that had ∼30% broken canines and primarily ate tough flesh; the cougar’s opportunistic diet may have been key to its survival.The dire wolf (Canis dirus), the most abundant carnivoran at La Brea, ranged from Canada to South America during the Pleistocene before becoming extinct. However, the coyote (Canis latrans), a smaller canid, survived the late Pleistocene extinction event, as did gray wolves, cougars, bobcats, and other smaller carnivorans. As coyotes are highly opportunistic today, eating smaller prey (e.g., rodents and lagomorphs) and also scavenging larger prey, such as deer, their “key to success” may have been similar to the La Brea cougars. Alternatively, coyotes—in contrast to cougars—may have opportunistically altered their diet following the extinction of numerous large predators and prey species, only recently becoming true opportunists.But wait. Why couldn’t Darwinism help the unlucky ones develop opportunistic diets? If the big cats and dogs were too big, why didn’t natural selection make them smaller? Out of all the dire wolves from Canada to South America, did none of them adapt in those ways? When you raise the perhapsimaybecouldness index, phrases like “may have” can save you from falsification.By the way, nothing evolved. Certain animals went extinct. Others survived.last_img read more

first_imgSouth Africa has won the top global award at the United Nations Investment Promotion Awards for its excellence in boosting investment sectors that have social and economic benefits and help countries meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).The awards, organised by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), honours investment promotions agencies and their governments for their achievements, but also showcases best practices in attracting investment into SDG-related projects that can inspire investment promotion practitioners in developing and developed countries. The award was presented at a high-profile ceremony in the Assembly Hall of the Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland, at the grand opening of the World Investment Forum yesterday.              South Africa was also recently named as the Global Destination of the Year at the 2018 Global Sourcing Association Awards ceremony alongside the Global Sourcing Summit in Cape Town. This award was South Africa’s fifth since 2012, and is further accolade and recognition of South Africa’s value proposition and credible offering that combines global best practice, a talented and scalable labour pool with government support to attract international outsourcing work into South Africa.“This prestigious global award indicates that South Africa’s industrial development is playing an important role towards its economic growth and our investment drive is already starting to make a significant contribution towards achieving its sustainable development goals. InvestSA is now globally recognised to compete in investment promotion and facilitation of large scale investments. As part of President Cyril Ramaphosa’s mobilisation drive to attract investments, these global awards signify and demonstrate that government is committed to improving its investment climate and service to investors,” says Davies                     The prestigious global award was presented to InvestSA for its role in facilitating two pioneering waste-to-nutrient recycling projects to up-cycle organic waste into natural, sustainable high-protein animal feed. Each project will offer much-needed jobs in local communities and is expected to save an annual 80 000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions by diverting organic waste from the landfill. The award was presented by the President of the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, Ms María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés.Minister Davies says that the award is a commendable international recognition that partnerships play an important role in boosting investments in sectors as the award is for an intergovernmental projects facilitated together with the Gauteng provincial government, Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) and GreenCape.“These awards are indicative that our investment mobilisation efforts are making a valuable contribution to social and economic development. We are enhancing our investment facilitation service and InvestSA is able to fast track, unblock and reduce red tape in government through our one-stop shop approach,” says Davies.Issued by: The Department of Trade and Industrylast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With heavy rains and high humidity expected to continue for the next few weeks across parts of the Midwest, a Purdue Extension specialist is advising corn and soybean producers to check their stored grain more frequently for signs of spoilage.“The prolonged rains lately, which have caused flooding, and the high ambient humidity are not favorable for grain storage,” said Klein Ileleji. “Therefore, it is time to check your grain bins weekly.”Spoilage and grain crusting typically occur more often in summer and especially when conditions are wet, Ileleji said. Solar load – direct sunlight on a grain bin roof – heats the space inside the bin. When the roof cools down at night, condensation can form, dripping back onto the warm grain surface. The excess moisture could cause caking and spoilage.To avoid warming up the grain bulk, which could cause spoilage, Ileleji recommended running a ventilation fan installed in the headspace at night to replace warm humid air with cooler air.He said farmers also needed to exercise caution when checking stored grain by taking samples using a probe known as a grain trier.“There is always a risk of entrapment when going into bulk grain in a confined space like a bin,” he said. “But there are a few things one can do to prevent damage or injury.”Before entering a bin, farmers should make sure the headspace is well ventilated, he said. Deteriorating grain produces carbon dioxide and other gasses, which at high concentrations in a confined space could overcome a person.“Aerate the bin headspace for about 30 minutes before entering by turning on the fans with the roof hatch open, or just run the headspace exhaust fan prior to entry,” Ileleji said.Farmers should also work in teams when inspecting grain bins.“Enter with a safety line and have someone keep a lookout for you,” Ileleji said. “If you are alone and something happens, you could be lost for some time before someone realizes you are gone and calls for help.”last_img read more

first_imgThe Delhi High Court on Tuesday reserved its order on the transit anticipatory bail plea of Honeypreet Insan, the adopted daughter of jailed Dera Sacha Dauda chief Ram Rahim, saying the “easiest way out” for her would be to surrender.Justice Sangita Dhingra Sehgal, after hearing arguments on behalf of Honeypreet and the police of Delhi and Haryana, said she would pass an order on it.The order is likely to be pronounced later on Tuesday.“The easiest way out for you would be to surrender,” the court observed.Honeypreet has been on the run since the conviction of Ram Rahim in two rape cases. She is facing a case of sedition for allegedly inciting violence in Haryana after the Dera chief’s conviction.Transit anticipatory bail plea is meant to seek protection against arrest during transit. In this case, Honeypreet is seeking bail for her transit from Delhi to Haryana to join the investigation in the sedition case.“A ploy to do ‘forum shopping’.”During the hearing, the Haryana police opposed the filing of her plea in the Delhi High Court, saying it was “a ploy to do ‘forum shopping’.”The Delhi Police also alleged that Honeypreet should have approached the Punjab and Haryana High Court, rather moving the Delhi High Court.The police of Delhi and Haryana opposed her plea for anticipatory bail for three weeks on the ground that the court of competent jurisdiction would be in Haryana.Honeypreet’s lawyer contended that her life was in danger in Haryana and that is why she has moved Delhi High Court seeking protection from arrest till she moves a court in the neighbouring State. The lawyer said she would join the probe if she was protected.last_img read more

first_imgVirat Kohli has condoled the deaths of former Prime Minister of India Atal Bihari Vajpayee and ex-India cricket captain Ajit Wadekar. Atal Bihari Vajpayee died at the age of 93 in New Delhi on Thursday a day after Wadekar, who passed away aged 77 after a prolonged illness.Vajpayee was admitted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) on June 11 and passed away on August 16 at 5.05 PM, according to a statement issued by AIIMS. The former Prime Minister was being treated for kidney infection, chest congestion, urinary tract infection and low urine output.After Vajpayee’s death was announced, the BCCI and cricketers across the nation tweeted to offer their condolences.Kohli also took to Twitter the pay his tributes to the two great personalities.”A sombre day for us as we mourn the loss of former PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee ji and Legendary Indian Captain Ajit Wadekar sir. May your souls rest in peace. India and its millions will always remember you fondly,” Kohli tweeted.A sombre day for us as we mourn the loss of former PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee ji and Legendary Indian Captain Ajit Wadekar sir. May your souls rest in peace. India and its millions will always remember you fondly.Virat Kohli (@imVkohli) August 16, 2018My deepest condolences on the passing of our former Prime Minister Sri Atal Bihari Vajpayee Ji. One of the few politicians I always respected for his honesty and devotion to the national cause. May his soul rest in peace.Shikhar Dhawan (@SDhawan25) August 16, 2018advertisementDeeply saddened to hear about the loss of Shri #AtalBihariVajpayee ji. His values and ideologies will be remembered forever.cheteshwar pujara (@cheteshwar1) August 16, 2018It’s been a sad week, the demise of one of India’s finest leaders “Mr. Vajpayee” is heartbreaking. #RIPVajpayeeAshwin Ravichandran (@ashwinravi99) August 16, 2018A sad day for the country, as we lose one of our greatest leaders. #AtalBihariVajpayee contributed so much for the betterment of the country. May his soul rest in peaceAnil Kumble (@anilkumble1074) August 16, 2018Vajpayee served as India’s Prime Minister three times. During his tenure as PM, Vajpayee had ordered nuclear tests to make India a nuclear weapons power and travelled by bus to Pakistan in a grand diplomatic gesture.Also Read – Atal Bihari Vajpayee dies at 93: Indian cricket team offers condolencesVajpayee occupies a fond place in the hearts of India’s cricketing superstars. Back in 2004, when India toured Pakistan for a Test and ODI series, Vajpayee had told then Indian captain Sourav Ganguly to win games as well as hearts in the neighbouring country: ‘Khel bhi jeetiye, dil bhi jeetiye.’India won the Test as well as the ODI series in Pakistan and they were showered with warm affection in the country. Ajit Wadekar passed away at the age of 77 in Mumbai (Getty Images)Wadekar is best remembered for captaining the Indian team to a 1-0 series win in the Caribbean in 1971 and then beating England by the same margin later in the year.Also read – Ajit Wadekar dies at 77: Cricket fraternity mourns death of legendary captainThe left-handed batsman scored 2,113 runs at an average of 31.07 in 37 Tests with a hundred and 14 half-centuries.(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more