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first_imgPensions-Sicherungs-Verein, Deutsche Post DHL, KPA Pension, Almi Företagspartner, Folksam, Svensk Forsäkring, Tryg, ASR, Russell Investments, La Française, MEAGPensions-Sicherungs-Verein (PSV) – Benedikt Köster will be joining the German pension lifeboat fund’s executive board with effect from January 1, 2021 to take over from Hans Melchiors as head of the operations and finance department. Melchiors will be stepping down from the board at the end of April to enter retirement.Köster is currently senior vice president for group pensions at Deutsche Post DHL Group in Bonn, having joined the company in 2006 from then Aon Jauch & Huebener Consulting, where he had been the international pension accounting chief. He is a member of the German actuarial association (DAV) and on the mathematical experts working group at aba, Germany’s main occupational pensions association.PSV is the €7.5bn mutual insurance association for occupational pension schemes in Germany and Luxembourg. It insures around €345bn of liabilities, covering some 11.1 million beneficiaries. KPA Pension — Britta Burreau, the chief executive officer of Sweden’s KPA Pension – a subsidiary of pensions and insurance group Folksam – is leaving to head up state-owned financing firm Almi Företagspartner. She is replacing the previous CEO Göran Lundwall, who decided to step down from the role at the end of this year. Burreau has led KPA Pension since 2016 and, prior to this, was CEO of Nordea Liv & Pension. Almi Företagspartner said she will start work in the new job by 15 November at the latest.Folksam/Svensk Forsäkring — Swedish insurance industry association Svensk Forsäkring, which counts the country’s largest pension funds as its members, has appointed the head of pensions and insurance group Folksam, Ylva Wessén, as a new member of its supervisory board.She has worked for the Folksam group since 2007, becoming its permanent chief executive officer in December 2019. Announcing a series of new appointments to the board as well as new tenures for existing members, Svensk Forsäkring also said its supervisory board chair Louise Sander, CEO of Handelsbanken Liv, had been re-elected, along with deputy chair Fredrik Bergström, the CEO of Swedish pensions and insurance group Länsförsäkringar.Tryg — Nordic general insurance group Tryg has appointed Christina Bustrup as its new head of pensions. She confirmed in a post on LinkedIn that she would be starting work in the new role in June. Bustrup joins the firm from her current role as chief commercial officer for Danish pensions IT company Edlund. She is also a member of the supervisory board of the Bank of Greenland.ASR – ASR Asset Management, part of Dutch insurance group ASR, has appointed Bas Kragten, Jules Koekkoek, Remco van Amelsfoort and Vincent Kroes as senior managers of its structured fixed income team. It said they will focus on investment grade debt instruments as well as ESG impact investments. All four joined from Dutch asset manager Actiam, the successor of SNS Asset Management.Kragten, who will lead the team, has been co-head of fixed income at Actiam, head of asset-backed securities at ING IM as well as senior investment manager at NIB Capital AM. Koekkoek’s previous positions include executive director at USB Investment Bank and Nomura. Kroes has been associate director at KPMG Corporate Finance as well as supervisor at the European Central Bank.Russell Investments – The asset manager has further strengthened its presence in the Dutch market with the addition of two experienced investment industry professionals. Jaap Hoek is joining as director of investment strategy and solutions for Northern Europe, and Marleen Barents-Jager as sales director retail for Benelux and the Nordics.Hoek joins from Robeco, where he was most recently a director and portfolio strategist in the company’s investment solutions team.Barents-Jager recently worked for Principal Global Investors, where she was responsible for business development activities, promoting and distributing the company’s range of mutual funds.La Française Group – Following an internal consultation that began several months ago, chairman of the executive board Xavier Lépine is leaving the €69.3bn asset manager and being replaced by Patrick Rivière, who until now held the position of chief executive officer.The group has also expanded the executive board with the addition of Marc Betrand and Philippe Lecomte, who have been with the group for many years already. The company said its reorganisation would help the group develop its multi-boutique model.Eric Charpentier, CEO of owner Crédit Mutuel Nord Europe, said: “I would like to thank Xavier Lépine for his valuable cooperation over all these years as well as his outstanding contribution to the Group’s expansion and his enthusiasm as a developer.“I welcome the appointment of Patrick Rivière and the new management team, who will be able to best respond to the current developments and successfully continue the expansion of La Française Group.”MEAG – The Munich-based asset manager MEAG has named two new CIOs. Joining from JP Morgan Asset Management, Prashant Sharma will assume responsibility for the management of the liquid assets portfolio as CIO for public markets.Separately, Michael Bös will become CIO, alternative assets, overseeing the division that will be created effective 1 July by bringing together under a single manager the illiquid assets and real estate businesses at MEAG Munich Ergo Asset Management. Bös has been heading up the investment strategy division at MEAG’s owner Munich Re.Sharma and Bös will effectively be succeeding Thomas Kurtz and Wolfgang Wente, respectively.MEAG manages the assets of reinsurance giant Munich Re and subsidiary ERGO, and currently manages €324bn, according to the company.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here.last_img read more

first_img Share Share Tweet LocalNews Grenadian national involved in road traffic accident in Tarreau by: – January 26, 2012 Sharing is caring!center_img Share Bedford Truck in Thursday’s accident. A Grenadian national and four Dominicans have sustained injuries as a result of a road traffic accident “under the cliff” in the village of Tarreau.Dominica Vibes News can report that about 4pm on Thursday a Suzuki Jeep registration number PK 992 driven by the Grenadian national and a Bedford truck registration number TB 878 with four Dominican passengers which were both travelling in a northerly direction collided.Suzuki Jeep involved in Thursday’s accidentAccording to an eye witness report; “both vehicles were travelling north when the driver of the jeep attempted to overtake and the truck followed his lead. The truck ended up hitting the jeep in the rear which caused the jeep to spin out of control. The truck then collided into the cliff”.All four were seriously injured and unconfirmed reports indicate that one of the men sustained serious injuries to his legs, while the Grenadian national sustained minor bruises to the head.Dominica Vibes News will provide confirmed report from the police as soon as it becomes available.Orange truck involved in minor accident in Canefield.Meanwhile, there was a minor accident in the Canefield area in the vicinity of Miniya’s 7-11 on Thursday afternoon which involved an orange truck and a Chinese national.The Chinese national supposedly parked the truck adjacent to Miniya’s 7-11 in Canefield but the truck began moving slowly indicating that the handbrakes may not have been fully engaged.The truck entered into a ditch and damaged a section of the Canefield Airport’s fence. Dominica Vibes News 76 Views   2 commentslast_img read more

first_imgMichael D. Carter, 69, dedicated husband, father, grandfather and brother passed away at home in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, surrounded by family on Friday, June 22, 2019.He is survived by his wife of fifty years, Bonita (nee Johangtes), and daughters Nichole (Jeff) Walden, Denise (Doug) Craven, both of Hidden Valley Lake in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. He is also survived by loving grandchildren William Michael, Gabriel Carter, Alyssa Michaela, and Riley Margaret, and granddogs Charlie and Kita.Mike is preceded in death by his father Henry and mother Myrtle (nee Metcalf) Carter of Cincinnati, Ohio, and sisters Juanita and Geraldine Carter of Cincinnati, Ohio. He is survived by his sister Carol Carter of Cincinnati, Ohio, and brother Jim (Gail) Carter of Louisville, Kentucky. He was a role model and dear uncle to his nephews, niece and many others.He is treasured for his selfless dedication to his family, benevolent nature to all, and quick-witted sense of humor. He made his life’s work at Ford Motor Company for 32 years, where he formed lifelong friendships.The last few months of his life illuminated his strength, bravery, kindness and humility as he battled a rare bone marrow cancer. We are proud to celebrate his life and legacy, and have hope in his eternal life through the power of Jesus Christ.Donations may be made to the Myelofibrosis MPN Research Foundation or St. Lawrence Parish in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.Private services will be at the convenience of the family at Jackman Hensley Funeral Home 215 Broadway Street, Harrison, Ohio 45030.last_img read more

first_img Published on November 28, 2012 at 3:00 am Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Facebook Twitter Google+ The magic number is 3,000.If the Syracuse Silver Knights can get that many paying customers to each of their 13 home games at the Oncenter War Memorial Arena, the team becomes profitable. The future then becomes more certain and more promising for professional soccer in the city of Syracuse.“If every soccer person just went to one game, any person that had anything to do with soccer,” Silver Knights President and head coach Tommy Tanner said, “you know, a kid playing soccer or played in the men’s league or played in the coed league, went to one game, we’d sell out all 13 home games.”But with an operating budget between $500,000 and $600,000, getting “more butts in the seats” is an exercise in indirect marketing. Billboards and TV commercials are out of the question for the Silver Knights. They’re too expensive. If the Silver Knights don’t reach that magic number of 3,000, though, they run the risk of joining their outdoor predecessors, the Syracuse Salty Dogs, and hundreds of other now-defunct teams in the graveyard of American soccer clubs.The Silver Knights front office aimed to sell about 750 season tickets for this season. Current sales are at about 460, said Nick Michalkow, director of group sales and fan services. The team originally planned to raise $500,000 through shares in the Syracuse Pro Sports Group, LLC. Shares are still available, but Vice President of Sales and Marketing Allen Laventure said he could not comment on the number sold.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSo the four-man, full-time front office staff has no choice but to get creative, save costs and hope fans show up.“For us it’s not about the 13 home games, it’s about being active and in the community 365 days a year,” Laventure said.On Black Friday, that meant sending the team to ring bells and work the donation kettle at Destiny USA. Other nights it means the team’s jersey color changes for a cause. And in an attempt to reach out to children and families, the Silver Knights carry out a three-part school assembly program known as the Knights’ Code, in which players speak to students about health and wellness, diversity and the dangers of bullying.“It’s being involved in the community where people are saying, ‘Wow, these guys are doing a lot, we see them everywhere,’” Laventure said. “And that’s one of the things that we’ve been fortunate of when I talk to sponsors they’re like, ‘Oh my gosh I was at this run’ or ‘My son came home with a worksheet from you guys.’”The Silver Knights are not bogged down by the same financial troubles that doomed the Salty Dogs, which were also part-owned by Pete Ramin, who is now a Silver Knights co-owner and vice president of operations.The Salty Dogs performed well at the gate, drawing the third-highest attendance in the 16-team USL First Division (USL-1) in 2004 despite splitting home games between P&C Stadium — now Alliance Bank Stadium — and Liverpool High School.But mere entry into the league cost $500,000, with $300,000 going toward a territory fee to the Rochester Raging Rhinos and $200,000 paid directly as a league fee. The high startup costs, in addition to a pricey lease agreement with P&C Stadium, caused the team to bleed money and cease operations in October 2004 after just two seasons.By contrast, in late 2009, USL-1 Senior Director Chris Economides reached out to Tanner about bringing a franchise  to Syracuse. There was no territory fee despite the eventual presence of another Rochester club, the Lancers. Instead of the $200,000 league fee that the Syracuse Pro Sports Group paid for the Salty Dogs, Syracuse Pro Sports, LLC, only paid a $50,000 fee for the Silver Knights franchise.Tanner and Michalkow estimated the Salty Dogs’ operating costs are $1.2 million. And while the Silver Knights’ are about half that, the second-year franchise must expand its fan base to thrive.“We definitely missed a couple markets last year,” said Michalkow, who is in his first year with the franchise.He and Laventure pointed to the Latino — 8.3 percent of the city’s population — and young adult demographics as areas of weakness for the club. So this year, the Silver Knights are writing game stories for CNY Latino.The Silver Knights also continue to push for Syracuse University students to attend games as Laventure reaches out to students in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics.“I think that college students, if they came and saw a game, would actually enjoy themselves,” he said. “Getting them off the Hill has been our biggest challenge.”Ultimately the Silver Knights target families as the foundation of their fan base. Laventure worked for the Syracuse Crunch, now the Tampa Bay Lightning’s AHL affiliate, from 1994 to 2000 as an account executive and director of youth hockey programs. Game days for the Crunch in those days mirror what the Silver Knights are attempting to create now: loud music, families and an overall party atmosphere.In 2004, when Tanner was still playing for the financially spiraling Salty Dogs, he attended his first Crunch game. He immediately thought “this would be a perfect place for indoor soccer.”The Silver Knights front office still sees hope in the Crunch model.“Our thought process was, ‘Let’s get people hooked on the event and they’ll come back,’” Laventure said. “And now you look 18 years later and the Crunch is — people who were kids then, well now those kids are now taking their kids.“So essentially they’ve instantaneously doubled their audience and their appeal because they have three generations going to their games instead of just two.”The front office is banking on keeping costs low, filling seats and getting the franchise off the ground and into year three, a milestone the Salty Dogs never reached.“I’ve never heard of one person not enjoying one of our games,” Tanner said. “You know, go to the game and go ‘That sucks, that’s not what I expected.’ Usually they say ‘That’s not what I expected, it was a lot better.’” Commentslast_img read more