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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Justin Gould / WNY News Now.LOUDONVILLE – A new poll finds that over 60 percent of New Yorkers say recent police killings are “part of a broader patter of excessive police violence toward Black people,” and are not isolated instances.Released by Siena College on Tuesday, the poll found that 81% of people believe that systemic racism in the country is a very (51%) or somewhat (30%) serious problem, while 18% say it’s not very (10%) or not at all (8%) a serious problem.Around 80% of those polled say recent new New York laws to improve policing will be good for the state.However, a majority of New Yorkers oppose reducing police funding and strongly oppose defunding the police, while a plurality supports demilitarizing the police. Some other findings include:More than 80% support: national police misconduct database, federal ban on chokeholds & mental health professionals riding with police on certain callsStrong support for recent demonstrations across the nation, 60-36%When seeing a police officer, 51% of white New Yorkers feel more secure & 13% less Secure; However, 46% of Black New Yorkers feel less secure & 13% more secureEliminating qualified immunity (63-26% support) has strong support from Democrats and independents and small plurality support from Republicans.Viewers can read the full report below:Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infolast_img read more

first_imgSource: The Messenger Less than seven weeks after Eagle Publications and the Twin State Valley Media Network of Claremont, NH announced they were bankrupt – instantly closing the doors of the Eagle Times daily and the weekly Message for the Week, The Connecticut Valley Spectator and The Weekly Flea – most of the staff of The Message are now involved with a new paper, The Messenger.The Messenger s 32-page first issue hit the streets on Tuesday, August 25.Co-edited by Robert Smith and Joe Milliken, the former co-editors of The Message for the Week, The Messenger is published by New Market Press of Middlebury, VT. It will be distributed every Wednesday, with a direct mailing of over 20,000 copies to the paper s core towns, including Ludlow, Londonderry, Chester, Springfield, Rockingham and Westminster. Another 5,000-plus copies will be dropped at key distribution centers in Walpole, Charlestown and Claremont in New Hampshire, and from Brattleboro north and west as far as Rutland in Vermont, making it Southern Vermont s largest weekly.The Messenger is a positive news and lifestyle paper, Smith said, with an emphasis on local community events, local sports, arts, entertainment and food. It will have a towns-style format, along with the local Joe Milliken’s local Sports pages, and A&E, Food and Home & Garden sections each week.In addition to Smith and Milliken, also working for The Messenger are several other former Message and Eagle Times employees, including Frank Amato, Deb Collier and Rick Martin in sales, office person Pam Crowley, and graphic designer Adrian Newkirk. In time, Smith said, as the paper grows, it is hoped even more former employees will be back. When we got the sudden announcement that our paper was closing on July 9, Smith said, As a staff we agreed to stay in touch and see if we could find some interest in creating a new paper to take The Message s place. While daily papers are struggling, we knew that The Message had been holding its own, and it had a lot of loyal readers and advertisers.Smith said he was surprised at the amount of interest that surfaced immediately in creating a new paper for the Southern Vermont region, including several from successful newspaper publishers throughout the Northeast. After what happened with Eagle Publications, we were cautious, Smith said. We wanted to make sure we were working with someone who knew how to put out a profitable weekly paper. Frank Amato got in contact with New Market and arranged for the staff to meet with them. We were impressed with them, and they liked the fact that they had a full, experienced staff to work with.Smith said things proceeded rapidly from that first meeting, and especially after the staff got together and agreed to work with New Market to create a brand new paper. Finding office space became critical. We would never have pulled this off without the staff here really taking charge and making it work, especially Frank Amato. Smith said. I think between Frank and I, we must have looked at 30 potential office sites from Ludlow to Rockingham. But less than four weeks later, we moved into our new offices on The Square in Bellows Falls. And it was a day less than five weeks from that first meeting Frank arranged til when our first issue hit the streets.last_img read more

first_img The Ulstermen, with just one interpro win in Dublin since 1999, stayed in the hunt through some strength-sapping phases. Leinster managed to hold them at arm’s length despite some incisive running from Stuart McCloskey and Craig Gilroy. Ireland out-halves Sexton and Jackson swapped penalties inside the opening quarter-hour, the latter scoring at the second attempt after a strong spell of carrying from the Ulster forwards and big centre McCloskey. Sexton then found Fitzgerald with a pinpoint cross-field kick past halfway, but the supporting Isa Nacewa – a late inclusion at full-back for Rob Kearney (tight hamstring) – was swiftly bundled into touch. Leinster carried more of an attacking threat in the second quarter, Sexton’s looping pass inviting Fitzgerald forward on the left wing again and Andrew Trimble conceded a five-metre lineout. The hosts were held up from close range and the prolonged spell of pressure near the Ulster posts petered out with a loose Nacewa pass. The hosts’ persistence eventually paid off approaching the interval. Although Robbie Diack denied them initially with an athletic steal, Cullen’s side got a second lineout right and the subsequent maul saw hooker Cronin crash over. Sexton missed the left-sided conversion with a poor strike. A barnstorming run from Rhys Ruddock saw Leinster begin the second period with a bang, however Sexton’s inviting pass was knocked on by Ben Te’o with the try-line at his mercy. Rory Best came to Ulster’s rescue as he held up Van der Flier past the whitewash following a powerful run from Tadhg Furlong, and the visitors dug deep to claw back possession and territory, a Peter Nelson kick finally bringing them back into the Leinster half. It was Leinster’s turn to scramble back after Trimble exploited some space on the left wing, but a well-won Moore penalty broke up a promising Ulster spell. Holding the lion’s share of possession, Leinster were unable to add to their lead and, frustratingly for visiting boss Les Kiss, the Ulstermen could not get back into scoring range. Ian Madigan pushed a long-range drop goal effort wide and Leinster relied on their well-organised defence to see them home, tackling to a standstill to claim a very hard-earned victory. Leo Cullen’s men claimed a deserved victory to get back on track after two disappointing weeks in Europe, with man of the match Luke Fitzgerald, Josh van der Flier and Martin Moore standing out. In a cagey first half with few moments of real quality, Ulster’s stubborn defence eventually gave way as Cronin drove over from a 36th-minute lineout maul to give Leinster an 8-3 lead. Jonathan Sexton and Paddy Jackson had kicked early penalties. Press Associationcenter_img Sean Cronin scored the only try of a bruising and defence-dominated Guinness PRO12 derby as Leinster overcame Ulster 8-3 at the RDS. last_img read more