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first_imgWATCH: The Preview Show for Michigan A message from FOX Sports about America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1 WATCH: Up to Speed: Vickers, Dillon in spotlight WATCH: Fantasy Showdown: Previewing Michigan FOX Sports 1 offers you the level of access to NASCAR content you’ve been accustomed to with SPEED. To go along with nearly 5,000 hours of live event, news and original programming annually, FOX Sports 1 is the home of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, select NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races (2015), select NASCAR Nationwide Series races (2015), as well as Speedweeks events, including Daytona 500 Coors Light Pole Qualifying, the Sprint Unlimited at Daytona International Speedway and the Budweiser Duels.Popular established NASCAR-specific programs, including NASCAR RaceDay, NASCAR Victory Lane and NASCAR Race Hub continue on FOX Sports 1, as does live coverage of practice and qualifying sessions from all three national series. On launch day, FOX Sports 1 brings you more than six hours of NASCAR programming, highlighted by coverage of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race from Michigan International Speedway – the first live event on America’s new sports network:Saturday 8/17 highlightsNASCAR Live – 8 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 8:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Keystone Light Pole Qualifying – 9:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 11 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Setup – Noon ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Racing – 12:30 p.m. ETFor a full schedule, details, and to find out which channel you can find FOX Sports 1 in your home, please visit www.FOXSports1.com.From your friends at FOX SportsMORE:center_img To our valued NASCAR fans:America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1, has arrived. We are proud and excited to tell you the network will continue its extensive coverage of NASCAR for many years to come. WATCH: NASCAR Next: Ryan Gifford KEY FOX AND FOX SPORTS 1 SUMMARY: 2015-2024• NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: First 16 points races (9 on FOX Sports, 7 on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Nationwide Series: First 14 points races (14 races on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Camping World Truck Series: All races• NASCAR Sprint Unlimited, Budweiser Duels and NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race• ‘TV Everywhere’ live-streaming rights for NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series and NASCAR Camping World Truck Serieslast_img read more

first_imgLike any other industry, healthcare is striving to reduce costs and increase productivity. Healthcare IT professionals are under pressure to find the most effective combinations of new technology to realize these improvements.In my second industry-themed blog post, I will be examining healthcare, exploring the four key drivers that are transforming the industry:Healthcare utilizationHealthcare financial modelsPatient and healthcare provider interactionsMedical scienceHow are healthcare providers’ IT strategies changing in the coming years?Healthcare providers in developed economies around the world are facing similar challenges, including rising costs and a fundamental shift in the way healthcare services are accessed.As populations age, there is a measurable increase in the cost of providing healthcare, which is compounded by shifts in the rates and types of illnesses being treated by clinicians. This has resulted in an influx of new financing and payment models to decrease provider costs while giving more value to the healthcare consumers.To combat disease and illness, medical professionals are becoming more innovative in their treatments, while expanding their areas of treatment from traditional medical sites (e.g., hospitals) to engage patients in mobile settings.Healthcare utilization is transformingOne of the by-products of an aging population is an increase in the treatment of chronic disease. By their very nature, chronic diseases are expensive to treat and time consuming for both patient and provider. Another by-product is access to healthcare services across borders, whether patients are across counties, states or nations.Healthcare providers are looking to technology to help solve these problems, specifically through the use of telehealth services. Telehealth services extend the range that healthcare can be delivered while reducing the need for clinicians to travel, which increases efficiency and productivity.This convenience and efficiency is complicated for IT professionals to deliver because they are heavily bound by regulatory requirements, security implications of patient records being outside the firewall and the need for gold standards in network, application, device and compute performance.Healthcare financial models are evolvingRevenue models for the healthcare industry are also under pressure. In countries such as England, the Nordics and Australia, government funding is changing from being calculated on process measures to outcome-based models, which factor in quality of life and early disease detection. The trend for healthcare costs is increasing across the globe, with one of the key metrics being the ratio of healthcare cost to GDP.Expect to see more business intelligence (BI) platforms that enable various organisational elements to become less reliant on one another for information, therefore increasing speed to decisions as they utilize more sophisticated reporting and dashboard tools. This can be achieved by linking together disparate data warehouses, which reduces data compartmentalization and increases visibility. Finally, analytical capabilities can be built on top of these BI platforms, which will provide real-time prediction of performance, losses and process failures.Patients are interacting with healthcare providers differentlyFrom a technology perspective, this change in interaction between patient and provider can be looked at as enabling patients with better information, creating tools that help patients self-diagnose or monitor illnesses, and creating social communities to provide additional services to patients ranging from support groups to treatment resources.It is in this area that we see rapid deployment of small, mobile applications and the use of private or customized social networks, which can intersect with analytical tools and bring deeper diagnostic capabilities (such as using IBM Watson as an invisible front line doctor!). In fact, according to Gartner, “By 2017, 30% of patients will regularly use mobile social commerce apps to engage their healthcare provider and access their health information.”[footnote]Predicts 2014: Healthcare Delivery Organization IT Leaders Published: 27 November 2013 G00258117[/footnote]Therefore IT will evolve patient portals from simple tools that access tests or medical records to robust platforms that can send messages to enhance and personalize patient engagement and experience. IT will be tasked with the development of these tools to be more personalized, meaningful and impactful for building relationships.Medical science is constantly transforming Historically, IT has been one of the most important drivers behind the transformation in medical science. Areas such as genomic sequencing, industrialization of medicine and diagnostics all owe their success on the ability to take advantage of IT.In the coming years we can expect these areas to expand to include personalized medicine as well as better point-of-care tools with real-time, individualized patient risk predictors and actionable care metrics. However, the technology that is getting the majority of attention from the industry is electronic health records (EHRs).EHRs are large-scale transformational projects that aim to simplify the complex and disparate nature of medical record keeping. They are considered to be the most complicated, expensive and politically charged project currently being deployed in the industry. According to Gartner, through 2017, annual spending on medical informatics needed for EHR optimisation will trend toward five times the initial informatics costs.[footnote]Predicts 2014: Healthcare Delivery Organization IT Leaders – G00258117[/footnote]The VCE perspectiveVCE offers specific industry-based solutions that are geared to solving the most critical issues faced in healthcare IT departments today.Vblock Specialized Systems for Extreme Applications deliver VDI solutions to provide a foundation for building out the latest healthcare services, such as telehealth and mobility capabilities, which can securely connect the clinician with patient records, irrespective of device or location.High-end systems provide the perfect solution to the problem faced by IT in healthcare as they scramble to implement EHR projects. With the large amount of storage, processing and network power needed to support an EHR, we understand that IT will require scalable and high-performance systems that can expand to support the rapidly increasing amounts of data being pushed through.last_img read more

first_imgNortheast Dairy Farmers reached a settlement agreement with Dean Foods Company in their class action antitrust lawsuit against Dean, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and Dairy Marketing Services (DMS). The agreement will include $30 million in monetary damages and injunctive relief that calls for Dean to purchase a portion of its raw milk from multiple Northeast sources.”This is a major win for dairy farmers in the Northeast who have been squeezed by monopolization and price-fixing,” said Benjamin Brown, an attorney at Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, PLLC, which represents the plaintiff dairy farmers. “We are pleased that Dean Foods is working with plaintiffs to put this practice behind them.”The lawsuit — Alice H. Allen, et al. vs. Dairy Farmers of America — is far from resolved, however, added Kit A. Pierson of Cohen Milstein.”The case is continuing against the remaining defendants, Dairy Farmers of America and its marketing affiliate Dairy Marketing Services,” explained Pierson. “Still at issue are charges that the DFA — the nation’s largest cooperative — monopolized a level of distribution of fluid milk in the Northeast and forced dairy farmers to join DFA or its marketing affiliate DMS to survive.”DFA and DMS have been named in the suit for engaging in monopolization, price-fixing, and other anticompetitive conduct.”The fact that Dean has agreed to purchase raw milk from multiple sources is a big step in the right direction,” said Robert Abrams of Howrey, LLP, which also represents the plaintiff dairy farmers. “What dairy farmers want is a choice between different bottlers. They have been living in a world that is monopolized and they pay the prices that are offered to them or they don’t sell milk. What we want is choice and competition.”The next step is for the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont — where the lawsuit was filed in August 2009 — to grant preliminary approval of the settlement agreement. Notice will then go out to the estimated 5,000 to 10,000 Northeast dairy farmers who could be eligible to file a claim for monetary damages.Abrams added, “We are pleased that a settlement with Dean has been reached and look forward to a timely court approval.”For more information, visit www.cohenmilstein.com(link is external).SOURCE Northeast Dairy Farmers WASHINGTON, Dec. 24, 2010 /PRNewswire/last_img read more

first_imgBy Dialogo July 20, 2009 Bogotá, July 16 (EFE).- Olivia Solarte, the mother of a police officer kidnapped by the FARC ten years ago, completed a march of more than 550 kilometers asking for the release of her son, Superintendent Jorge Trujillo Solarte, in Bolívar Square in central Bogotá today. Accompanied by her husband and by five retired Colombian army soldiers, the woman in her sixties covered the distance between the municipality of Gamarra, in the Cesar Department in northern Colombia, and the capital in thirteen days, with the hoping to speak to Colombian president Álvaro Uribe in Bogotá, a meeting that could finally take place on Friday. “I am very happy and pleased because now I have reached my goal,” EFE was told by Trujillo’s mother, who suffered from health problems during her journey and who even had to receive treatment at several hospitals along the way, as she disobeyed medical advice to give up her march. She recalled that there were more than a few times that she had to cover stretches of the route in “a police car or hooked up to an oxygen tube,” as she commented. Her march was joined by the parents of other hostages held by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), calling for a humanitarian agreement between the government and the guerrilla group for the release of those kidnapped. Solarte expressed confidence that “this outcry will reach the hearts of the guerrillas so that those kidnapped will not die in the jungle any more,” and added, “neither my son nor anyone else.” The marcher explained that her four children “serve their country” and that one of them, a career soldier, was murdered by the FARC in her presence. Same as Gustavo Moncayo, a professor and father of Pablo Emilio Moncayo, a Colombian army corporal kidnapped by the FARC more than eleven years ago, Solarte began her march, “seeing that there was a great deal of silence” around the kidnapping of her son. Trujillo Solarte was kidnapped by the FARC in Puerto Rico (El Meta, in the center of the country) on September 11, 1999, in a rebel attack on a police station. Despite the fact that the officer’s family last received evidence that he was alive six years ago, they know that he is well to some extent, since this was reported by the former governor of El Meta, Alan Jara, his fellow captive until his release in February.last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Testie FishOff TargetThe Pacu, the fish that made a splash for its taste for testicles, has reportedly been found in a New Jersey pond. That means it’s a short swim away from Long Island, which is way too close for comfort. And we were worried about the Atlantic Beach shark sighting!Crocodile WrestlersPartial ScoreA Holtsville man is suing a Mexican golf course where a crocodile ate two of his fingers as he took practice swings. Apparently living on Long Island, where more than a dozen alligators have turned up in the past year, taught him how to instinctively free himself from the jaws while his golf partner wrestled the croc. Still a better story than our last trip to Cancun.Breaking BadOn TargetMurderous meth kingpin Walter White shows what can happen to chemistry teachers who turn to the dark side when they can’t afford the co-pay for their cancer treatments. And what a strange, seven-year trip it was. Withdrawal is hard to take for us fans.Dina LohanOff TargetSomehow managing to one-up her infamous actress daughter’s legal troubles, Mrs. Lohan gets arrested for DWI days before her 51st birthday and two weeks after the bank moves to foreclose on her $1.3-million Merrick home. Oh, and she recanted a claim that she was injured when Troopers took her into custody. After being interviewed by Oprah. We couldn’t make this stuff up.NewsdayOff TargetLong Island’s lone daily newspaper fails to disclose in their coverage and endorsement of Democrat Tom Suozzi in the Nassau County executive race that their parent company, Cablevision, donates to his campaign and hired him after he was unseated in 2009. Instead of issuing their usual comment when we call them out—“we stand behind our coverage”—a Newsday flack declines to comment. The silence is deafening.last_img read more

first_imgThe Owner, Michael Hakes, says right now, the store is a pop-up. He explained how it came to be, saying that in the wake of the pandemic, 10 local artists and friends decided to come together to sell their products. Organizers say its important to support one another in the community. The Artisan Shop in Endicott is a store that sells only products made by local artists. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — A local shop in Endicott is reminding residents to not only shop locally and support local artists and businesses but to also adopt locally. The shop was also asking people to sign cards as they left which will be delivered to nursing homes later in the holiday season. And make sure to stop by when you can, as right now the store is a pop-up and might only be open for a little while longer. They also say they hope to partner with The Artisan Shop sometime again soon for another adoption event. If you’re looking to adopt, Every Dog’s Dream Rescue says to go to their website and fill out an application form. The Adopt and Shop event organizers from The Artisan Shop teamed up with Every Dog’s Dream Rescue to promote adoption, and there were many kittens at the event ready to be taken home. You can visit the store in Endicott which is attached to the Dickin Memorial Animal Hospital.last_img read more

first_imgMar 10, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – US public health spending is very uneven from state to state and is eroding in the face of the economic recession, the nonprofit group Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) said in a report released today.State shares of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funds for disease prevention and other public health purposes averaged $17.60 per person in fiscal year 2008, but they ranged all the way from $12.74 for Indiana to $52.78 for Alaska, says the report by the nonpartisan health advocacy group based in Washington, DC.Meanwhile, state and local public health departments shed 11,000 jobs in 2008, said Robert (Bobby) Pestronk, executive director of the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), at a press teleconference on the report today.”A survey by NACCHO and CSTE [the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists] found that another 10,000 public health jobs may be cut in the next year or two,” Pestronk added.Jeff Levi, executive director of TFAH, said overall public health spending, now about $35 billion a year, is about $20 billion short of what is needed.The report, titled “Shortchanging America’s Health: A State-by-State Look at How Federal Public Health Dollars Are Spent and Key State Health Facts,” was produced in cooperation with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.Uneven state sharesLevi said about 75% of the CDC’s budget is distributed to states and communities. For fiscal year 2008, those allocations totaled $5.35 billion, according to the report.”It’s a tiny fraction of what we spend on treating people after they become sick,” Levi said. “Our priorities are upside down.”By region, the Northeast and West received higher shares than the Midwest and South. State per capita amounts averaged $22.49 in the Northeast, $23.94 n the West, $18.43 in the South, and $17.69 in the Midwest.Levi said that for some programs the CDC just doesn’t have enough money to fund every state. “In most cases where states are on the lower end of the scale, it’s because there’s not enough funding to go around and it’s often up to the luck of the draw.” For example, he said only 22 states are funded for school health programs.Because the CDC has limited funds to distribute, it awards some money on the basis of a formula and the rest on a competitive basis, with the result that some states lose out, Jim Pearsol, chief program officer for public health performance at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), told CIDRAP News in an interview.The TFAH report shows that state shares of federal health funding streams other than from the CDC also varied considerably. Funds from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) ranged from $9.96 for Kansas to $70.75 for Alaska, averaging $21.43 per person overall. The national total for 2008 was about $5.72 billion.Allocations for hospital preparedness for public health emergencies averaged $1.43 per person but varied from 72 cents for New York to $2.15 for Wyoming, the report says. The money is distributed by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) in the Department of Health and Human Services. The total that went to states in 2008 was $361.6 million.The report also looks at state public health funding and shows wide disparities. It lists median state spending on public health at $33.71 per person, with a range all the way from $3.37 in Nevada to $172.21 in Hawaii. It notes that states allocate and report their budget in different ways and provide varying levels of detail, making comparisons difficult.Health budget cutsThe report says that at least 46 states are facing deficits in their 2009 and/or 2010 budgets.Pestronk said the state and local public health job losses last year and additional expected ones will have noticeable effects: “In the face of the Salmonella outbreak, restaurants won’t be inspected as frequently as they had been.” In addition, surveillance of infectious diseases will be reduced, and officials will sometimes have to decide between immunization and treatment programs, he said.A national survey of 2,422 local health departments in November and December found that more than half had either laid off employees or lost some through attrition, according to the report. It says that 44% of state health departments have a job vacancy rate of 10% or higher.Levi noted that the recently passed economic stimulus bill included $1 billion for public health. He said that includes $650 million for community disease prevention, $300 million to expand immunization programs, and $50 million to battle healthcare-associated infections.”We still don’t know the exact nature of the initiatives the administration will plug these funds into,” he said. The money will make a big difference, he said, adding, “It’s a critical investment but a one-time-only investment.”Pestronk said it appears that the immunization funds may be used mainly to buy vaccines, but NACCHO hopes the money can also be used to hire staff. “With the kinds of layoffs and cuts we’ve been talking about, the very staff needed to deliver the vaccines are being lost at the same time that funds are being made available to increase the supply,” he said.An analysis by TFAH and the New York Academy of Medicine concluded it would take a total of $55 billion to $60 billion a year, or $187 per person, to adequately fund public health, the report states. Levi said current spending totals about $35 billion.”Based on the current funding model, the federal government should provide 60 percent of this increase ($12 billion more than fiscal year 2005 dollars) and state and local governments should provide 40 percent of this increase ($8 billion annually),” the report says.It acknowledges that states and localities will find it tough to increase funding during the current recession, but suggests that they devise funding strategies to implement once the economy improves. Possible sources of new money include taxes on soda, candy, and tobacco products, it says.State officials’ viewsDavid Sundwall, MD, executive director of the Utah Department of Health, said he welcomed the essential message of the report but attached less importance to the state funding rankings. The report lists Utah as 39th in its share of CDC funding, at $15.73 per person.”Those of us who are state health officials are grateful that there are people looking at this because we’re convinced that public health in general is underfunded,” he told CIDRAP News. “In my view as state health officer, I wouldn’t consider the rankings as useful to me as the message. I’m not going to lose any sleep over the ranking but will use my voice to call for better funding for pubic health, as opposed to medical care and research.”At $2 trillion a year, US healthcare spending has gotten out of balance with the rest of the economy, Sundwall said, adding, “We’ve got to look at what we’re investing in the healthcare complex and get back into things that improve our health, and not just provide services.”Sundwall said he questions the utility of state rankings for health spending. He observed that in evaluations by the United Health Foundation, Utah consistently ranks high for general health indicators, but the state gets “dinged” for relatively low per capita spending on public health.”While I would welcome more money and we’d spend it wisely and well, I’m not sure it’s a fair indicator,” he said. “If I were a legislator and I saw our health rankings and some of the success we do enjoy, I’d probably put it into other competing causes.”Sundwall said public health in Utah is feeling the effects of the recession and resulting budget cuts, even though the economy there is better than in many other places.Last September the Utah Legislature cut $33 million out of the health department’s budget, and the new budget the legislature is working on now would take about another $40 million, he said. “That requires me to lay off people. . . . It’s a sad, hard time to be a manager and have to go through these retrenchments. But we also acknowledge that in this economy, the public sector has to carry some freight just like the private sector.”Craig Acomb, chief financial officer at the Minnesota Department of Health, raised questions about how fully the TFAH report reflects Minnesota’s spending on public health and its share of federal health dollars. The state ranks 40th in CDC funds received, 48th in HRSA funds, and 28th in ASPR funds.While acknowledging that he hadn’t studied the report, he said it probably does not reflect a statewide health improvement program, passed this year, that will provide $47 million over the next 2 years to battle obesity and tobacco use.Also, he said, “A lot of public health in this state is funded at the local level,” with 53 community health boards across the state drawing funds from property taxes. Further, he said the state receives other federal funds for public health purposes not covered in the report, such as Environmental Protection Agency money to protect drinking water.”Even though we may not get the most money from the CDC, we have some of the highest health indicators in our people, with some of the lowest rates of diabetes, infant mortality, obesity,” Acomb said. “We’re certainly making effective use of the resources that we have.”Pearsol, of ASTHO, said he thinks the report “resonates well with what the states are experiencing.” He commented that the wide variation in CDC allocations to states shows that the CDC itself is underfunded, and added, “It’s quite true that the recession is having a devastating impact on general revenue funds in states. . . . Those [public health] job losses are real losses.””The whole point that TFAH is making is that doubling the investment would be more akin to the need from a population-based health perspective,” he said.See also: Mar 10 TFAH news release with link to the full reporthttp://healthyamericans.org/report/61/shortchanging09last_img read more

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first_imgAdvertisement Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 6 May 2020 3:25 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link189Shares Comment Henrikh Mkhitaryan sends clear message to Arsenal over his future Advertisement Mkhitaryan was shipped out on loan at the start of this season (Picture: Getty Images)Henrikh Mkhitaryan has made it clear he doesn’t plan on returning to Arsenal and instead wants to make his loan move to Roma permanent in the next transfer window, according to reports in Italy.The Armenian was sent out on a season-long loan to the Serie A side at the start of the campaign after being deemed surplus to requirements at the Emirates Stadium.Despite missing large portions of the season through injury, Mkhitaryan has registered six goals and three assists in just 13 league appearances.His excellent form prompted Roma manager Paulo Fonseca to declare his interest in keeping the 31-year-old at the club after his loan deal expires.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I want him to stay and he also wants to stay,’ Fonseca told Russian TV programme Great Football last week.‘However, it should be clear that everything is now on hiatus, and we’ll have to talk to Arsenal.‘I want to continue working with him because he’s a great player and a great man.’ Mkhitaryan may not be in Mikel Arteta’s plans (Picture: Getty Images)And according to Italian outlet Corriere dello Sport, Mkhitaryan had the following message for Arsenal when asked about his future plans: ‘My time in London is over, I hope you manage to find an agreement with Rome because my desire is to stay.’The report also states that the Gunners have lowered their asking price for the midfielder from €25.2m (£22m) to around €10m (£8.7m).More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalThe 31-year-old’s agent, Mino Raiola, is mediating the deal between the two clubs and is said to have explained to Arsenal that selling Mkhitaryan for a more affordable price is a better option than paying his wages to just sit on the bench.The Gunners have also been strongly linked with a move for Atletico Madrid midfielder Thomas Partey, who has a release clause of £43.5m.However, club head of football Raul Sanllehi told staff not to expect any mega-money moves this summer as finances will be severely affected by the ongoing coronavirus crisis.MORE: Mikel Arteta tips Kieran Tierney to become ‘special’ at ArsenalMORE: Atletico Madrid star Thomas Partey warned Arsenal transfer could ‘destroy’ his careerFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.last_img read more

first_imgWashington Times 28 Sept 2013Spanking has become taboo in many communities, and the favored method of discipline for unruly children across the country has become the time out. However, when children, especially those troublesome toddlers in the “terrible twos” start disobeying, many parents first result to yelling to communicate their displeasure. A new study conducted at the University of Pittsburgh and published in the journal Child Development finds that yelling at children may be as harmful as hitting.While this may come as a shock to parents, the study finds that children who were frequently yelled at, called names like “lazy,” or cursed at suffered even if the rest of the parent-child relationship was warm and stable. The effects of the negative language were not as visible as physical abuse to the average person, but rather the problems were more emotional and behavioral.Children whose parents reported using harsh language with their children experienced higher behavioral problems in the following year than children who parents did not yell. These children showed increases in the following year in fighting with peers as well as with their parents, doing poorly in school, lying and showing signs of depression. Surprisingly, these effects were the same as with children whose parents used spanking or pushing as a physical discipline approach.While the study group was composed of adolescents ages 13-14, the principles can still be applied to young children. The study said that yelling had such a negative impact because of the developing self-image, and it makes them feel incapable and hurts their self-image.Young children also are developing an important sense of self during the trouble time of toddler-hood and pre-school when they are trying to exert their independence and explore the world around them in new ways. If yelling has such negative consequences on older children who are developing into young adults, think what it can do to the self-esteem and confidence of a young child. The potential is for it to set up a negative cycle of failure and discipline problem for years to come.http://c.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/parenting-first-time-through/2013/sep/28/yelling-children-harmful-hitting-new-study-finds/last_img read more