Month: March 2021

first_imgWATCH: The Preview Show for Michigan A message from FOX Sports about America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1 WATCH: Up to Speed: Vickers, Dillon in spotlight WATCH: Fantasy Showdown: Previewing Michigan FOX Sports 1 offers you the level of access to NASCAR content you’ve been accustomed to with SPEED. To go along with nearly 5,000 hours of live event, news and original programming annually, FOX Sports 1 is the home of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, select NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races (2015), select NASCAR Nationwide Series races (2015), as well as Speedweeks events, including Daytona 500 Coors Light Pole Qualifying, the Sprint Unlimited at Daytona International Speedway and the Budweiser Duels.Popular established NASCAR-specific programs, including NASCAR RaceDay, NASCAR Victory Lane and NASCAR Race Hub continue on FOX Sports 1, as does live coverage of practice and qualifying sessions from all three national series. On launch day, FOX Sports 1 brings you more than six hours of NASCAR programming, highlighted by coverage of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race from Michigan International Speedway – the first live event on America’s new sports network:Saturday 8/17 highlightsNASCAR Live – 8 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 8:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Keystone Light Pole Qualifying – 9:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 11 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Setup – Noon ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Racing – 12:30 p.m. ETFor a full schedule, details, and to find out which channel you can find FOX Sports 1 in your home, please visit www.FOXSports1.com.From your friends at FOX SportsMORE:center_img To our valued NASCAR fans:America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1, has arrived. We are proud and excited to tell you the network will continue its extensive coverage of NASCAR for many years to come. WATCH: NASCAR Next: Ryan Gifford KEY FOX AND FOX SPORTS 1 SUMMARY: 2015-2024• NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: First 16 points races (9 on FOX Sports, 7 on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Nationwide Series: First 14 points races (14 races on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Camping World Truck Series: All races• NASCAR Sprint Unlimited, Budweiser Duels and NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race• ‘TV Everywhere’ live-streaming rights for NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series and NASCAR Camping World Truck Serieslast_img read more

first_imgThe Michigan-based Hoxeyville Music Festival has released its festival lineup for this summer and as always, it is primed with some of the finest string musicians around, both national and local. Hoxeyville will be spearheaded by Kalamazoo’s own Greensky Bluegrass this year, who will be playing two sets at the festival. Others slated to play include Railroad Earth, Luke Winslow King, Billy Strings, Sweet Water Warblers, Airborne Or Aquatic, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades and The Crane Wives.Held on 100+ acres of farmland and surrounded by the hardwoods of the Manistee National Forest, Hoxeyville will be a great intimate getaway for any music lover. Wristbands to the event are on sale now and can be found at the festival’s website here. Check below for the festival’s complete lineup:last_img read more

first_imgUPDATE 11:20 AM: The full “Burn The Witch” single has been released! Listen/Watch here.It may not be much, but at least it’s something.Two days after completely clearing out their social media accounts and website, Radiohead has begun preparations for the announcement of their new album. The band has started the process with a brief clip, thematically falling in line with the “Burn The Witch” motif that was published on those leaflets last weekend. While little details are available, it seems increasingly likely that “Burn The Witch” will be the title of the new release, if not a song or major component of the album. Especially with this new video…Watch below:last_img read more

first_imgIn their new video for the song “Fever Dreams”, Tom Hamilton’s American Babies got trippy, psychedelic and extremely animated. The track, off the band’s recent release, An Epic Battle Between Light and Dark, delivers imagery very much in the same vein as both the album and song titles. The video, directed by Tea Leaf Green guitarist Josh Clark, opens with Hamilton falling into a nightmare of straight disassociation from reality, a literal fever dream. As he slips further into this altered state, we see the Babies front man contend with the likes of ice cubes from his whiskey glass turning into a rattlesnake, running from bipedal fish, and taking a dive off a serious cliff into a never-ending pit.Tom Hamilton Announces Dead After Party With Marco Benevento, Oteil Burbridge & MoreHamilton told Philadelphia’s The Key: “The overall vibe for this record is to dig into those dark places that we don’t like to acknowledge, and I wanted his creative process to have mirrored mine.” He went on to say, “The moment when your inner filter starts to twitch a bit, that’s when you know you’re on to something. I found the video to be weird, at times scary, and even profound.” Check out “Fever Dreams”:Tom Hamilton’s American Babies have a busy schedule over the next couple of months with shows at Philly’s Live From The Lot, Brooklyn Bowl with Jackie Greene, Disc Jam Music Festival, and Beanstalk Music & Arts Festival. Hamilton also recently announced a special late-night show at The Fox Theatre in Boulder after Dead & Co. on Sunday, July 3rd with American Babies and special guests Marco Benevento, Oteil Burbridge, and Grahame Lesh’s Midnight North (get tix here).[via The Key]last_img read more

first_imgPurple Hatter’s Ball has released the daily schedule for their 9th annual event at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak, Florida. Going down June 17-19 weekend, PHB will utilize four stages in the park, including the famed Amphitheater Stage, surrounded by live oak trees and Spanish moss, a Beach Stage located along the wild black water Suwannee River, and a Campground Stage, which will morph into the Silent Disco late night, keeping the party going until the wee hours of the morning.Closing out each night on the Amphitheatre Stage will be headlining sets from Papadosio on Friday, The Polish Ambassador followed by The Floozies on Saturday, and Melvin Seals and JGB on Sunday. Each night will bring a spectacular close to a fun-filled day of music, yoga, arts, and community.The Thursday Pre-Party, featuring a closing late-night set from Sunsquabi, will take place in the Spirit of Suwannee Music Hall right after the Action Day with The Polish Ambassador, where PHB attendees are invited to unite in action with their choice of community-building, and environment-sustaining activities, suited with tangibly regenerative projects that will make SOSMP a better place for everyone. Participants of the Action Day are invited to attend the Thursday Night Pre-Party for free. More information about the projects can be found here; and you can sign up here!The full schedule can be found on the festival’s website and in the graphics below:The Yoga & Art Village Program will offer 25 fun, informative, healthy living activities and classes that will include: Kirtan Morningstar; BoomYoga Spiritual Warrior with Joaquin Antonio; Sound Healing Meditation; West African Drumming with Luke Quaranta; Live Music Vinyasa Flow; Creative Expressions Drawing; AcroYoga; Contact Hooping and many more. Make the most out of your weekend of music and be sure to make your way over to the Yoga & Arts Village for some life-changing experiences. The full schedule can be found on the festival’s website.Buy your tickets today and get excited with this video:More information and tickets can be found on the festival’s website. As always, Purple Hatter’s Ball benefits The Rachel Morningstar Foundation (a non-profit 501c3 organization) in honor of longtime SOSMP friend and music festival lover Rachel Morningstar Hoffman, who lost her life in a tragic turn of events when she was arrested, strong-armed into a role as a confidential informant to the police, and ultimately murdered at the hands of drug dealers. You can learn more about the horrific story of her loss in this interview with her mother, Mama Margie, who will lead an emotional ceremony celebrating her daughter’s memory.last_img read more

first_imgTech giant Apple is currently in talks with streaming service TIDAL to acquire the platform and use it to bolster their own service, Apple Music, according to sources close to the matter. Although negotiations are still underway, and confirmation and terms of the deal are still unconfirmed, Apple’s streaming efforts would surely stand to benefit from TIDAL’s exclusive relationships with various high-profile artists like Kanye West and Madonna. The issue of artist royalties from streaming has become more and more pertinent in recent years as the record industry has shifted away from purchased digital and physical units and toward a more streaming-based model. With declining record sales, artists now have to make the majority of their money from touring, and many feel that this may have an overall negative effect on the quality and quantity of new music that new artists are able to bring to fruition. Hip Hop mogul Jay Z purchased TIDAL in March of 2015 for $56 million in an attempt to route a larger portion of the proceeds from music streaming to the artists rather than large corporations.As Jay Z said in an interview with Billboard following the purchase, “For someone like me, I can go on tour, but what about the people working on the record, the content creators and not just the artists? If they’re not being compensated properly, then I think we’ll lose some writers and producers and people like that who depend on fair trade. Some would probably have to take another job, and I think we’ll lose some great writers in the process.” Jay sold equity stakes in the company to nearly twenty other artists, marketing the endeavor as the first artist-owned streaming service and offering perks like exclusive releases for paying subscribers. The infographic below, via Information Is Beautiful, which shows the disparities between artist payouts for streaming between the various competing services, illustrates Hov’s noble intentions in purchasing TIDAL:However, Jay’s big plans for TIDAL have not gone as well as expected. A year after the purchase, TIDAL’s subscription numbers are well below expectations, still trailing Apple and Spotify‘s services by considerable margins, leading to a smaller net payout for artists via TIDAL despite their higher per-stream rates. Furthermore, a handful of artists have brought legal action against the company for problems with payment. Earlier this year, John Emanuele from the band The American Dollar filed a class-action suit claiming that TIDAL has yet to compensate the band for any of the royalty payments accrued from the streaming of the band’s 116 copyrighted songs on the platform. This has prompted Jay Z and Tidal to mount a concurrent suit against the company that sold them the service last year, saying that the user numbers they presented were fraudulent.Despite publicly remaining behind his venture, Jay Z has been shopping the company around to big tech companies for months, having reportedly taken meetings with Facebook and Samsung as well. While it is unclear how Apple would incorporate TIDAL’s current structure into their own efforts, if Apple does end up purchasing the company, the already-competitive streaming industry will become an even smaller club, consolidating more power with fewer large corporations and making it harder and harder for artists to change the status quo, as Jay and his partners originally sought to do with TIDAL.last_img read more

first_imgPigeons Playing Ping Pong | Madison Theater | Covington, KY | 12/31/2017 | Photos: Keith Griner To ring in 2018, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong took over the Madison Theater in Covington, Kentucky for their New Year’s Eve celebration. Throughout their show, the Baltimore-based funk act worked in a number of classic Disney tunes alongside the group’s more typical catalog.With all members of the group dressed as Mickey Mouse in his familiar outfit of red pants and suspenders, black shirts, and mouse ears, Pigeons wasted no time getting to work, opening the show with the Lion King opening and the 20th Century Fox theme and giving a glimpse to fans as to what was in store for the rest of the evening. Mixed in with takes on their own tunes like “Walk Outside”, “King Kong”, and “Something For Ya” were covers of The Lion King’s “Mighty Jungle” (“The Lion Sleeps Tonight”, originally made famous in 1961 by The Tokens), “Hakkunah Matatah”, and “Just Can’t Wait To Be King” in addition to a rendition of Moana’s “Shiny”.For the second set, the band returned first with “Too Long”, a tune off the group’s most recent album Pizazz, and a fan-pleasing rendition of “Poseidon” before a take on “Auld Lange Syne” to start off 2018. Returning to their Disney theme, the group pulled some tunes inspired by Aladdin, including “A Whole New World”, “Arabian Nights”, and Steppenwolf’s “Magic Carpet Ride”. Housed in a “Horizon” sandwich, the group worked in a cover of Jungle Book’s “Bare Necessities”, which was then followed by covers of “When You Wish Upon A Shooting Star” and “Can You Feel The Love Tonight” and their original new tune “Dawn A New Day”.[Video: Silas Tockey]Rounding out the show, the group used “Schwanthem” as a jumpoff point for a take on Pochahontos’ “Color Of The Wind” before ending the show with a return to “Schwanthem” and “The Liquid”. For Pigeons Playing Ping Pong’s encore, the group laid out a standout rendition of “Couldn’t We All” before performing the “Mickey Mouse Club” introduction theme, then finishing out the show in full with a “Zydeco” sandwich featuring “A Tale As Old As Time”.You can check out a full gallery of photos from the show below, courtesy of Phierce Photography.Setlist: Pigeons Playing Ping Pong | Madison Theater | Covington, KY | 12/31/2017Set One: Circle of Life Intro* > 21st Century Fox > Melting Lights Walk Outside > The Lion Sleeps Tonight > Walk Outside King Kong > Shiny* > King Kong Sunny Day Hakuna Matata* > Time To Ride Somethin’ For Ya > I Just Can’t Wait To Be King*Set Two: Too Long Poseidon% > Auld Lang Syne^ > A Whole New World*^ > Magic Carpet Ride # > Poseidon Horizon > I Wanna Be Like You* > Bare Necessities* > I Wanna Be Like You > Horizon > When You Wish Upon A Star*^ Dawn A New Day Skipjack > Can You Feel The Love Tonight* Schwanthem > Colors of The Wind* > Schwanthem > The LiquidEncore: Couldn’t We All > M-I-C-K-E-Y-M-O-U-S-E* Zydeko > Tale As Old As Time*^ > ZydekoNotes: * First time played | ^ Instrumental | % w/ NYE countdown | # w/ “Arabian Nights” and “How Far I’ll Go” teases <a href=”http://pigeonsplayingpingpong.bandcamp.com/album/disnye-2017″>DisNYE 2017 by Pigeons Playing Ping Pong</a>center_img Load remaining imageslast_img read more

first_imgEarlier in the year, The Peach Music Festival dropped the highly anticipated lineup for its 2018 edition, which will take place at Montage Mountain in Scranton, Pennsylvania, from July 19th through 22nd (almost a full month earlier than it has in previous years). At the time of the original announcement, the festival revealed that it would host Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band, two sets of Gov’t Mule (including a “Dark Side of the Mule” set), two sets of Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, the return of Dickey Betts and his band (marking the Allman Brothers Band original member’s first announced show since ending his retirement), two sets of moe., the annual “Wake Up with Warren Haynes”, two sets of Twiddle including “Twiddle & Friends”, the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Blackberry Smoke, and many moreFamily And Friends Of The Allman Brothers Reunite At Peach Fest For Gregg & Butch Tribute [Audio]Today, The Peach Music Festival added to their already enviable list of headlining performers, announcing that now Umphrey’s McGee has joined the ranks of acts who will perform at the event. In addition to this truly impressive list of headliners, the festival has also tapped Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Turkuaz, Spafford, The Marcus King Band, Leftover Salmon, Dumpstaphunk, Anders Osborne & Jackie Greene, Nicki Bluhm, Aqueous, BIG Something, Ghost Light (featuring Tom Hamilton & Holly Bowling), and The Main Squeeze to appear during the event. The impressive lineup is rounded out by Brandon “Taz” Niederauer Band, Organ Freeman, Driftwood, The Magic Beans, Midnight North, Litz, Mo Lowda & The Humble, The Blue Stones, Soule Monde, Gatos Blancos, Flux Capacitor, JP Biondo, Bobby Lee Rodgers, Bishop Gunn, Funky Dawgz Brass Band, and Juice.Check out an updated lineup card for The Peach Music Festival below, and head to the Peach Fest website for more details and tickets.[Photo: Phierce Photo]last_img read more

first_imgLive For Live Music: Will you tell us how you came up with the concept of Conspire To Smile?Reid Genauer: I found myself like many of us: stuck, starting with a sense of awe and dismay. It’s not only politics that plays into it. There’s also the #MeToo movement and all the exceptional weather events related to climate change. There are just a lot of big moving parts happening at once. Social media is a cultural revolution that has no point of view. In the sixties, there was the intent to expand consciousness and lead with love and compassion. The mantra for today’s social revolution—which isn’t even described as such—is the democratization of everything, and it has a neutral point of view.Some of the big companies are coming under scrutiny for that—this idea that the power they yield has to have a point of view. My point of view is that if people are just sharing negative or inane stuff, what is any organization supposed to do? The question I ask myself is, who has a point of view and who is sharing it, besides just adding to the negative spin?It is really hard to find or to point to too many individuals or organizations who are doing that. I was scratching my head on how to free myself from feeling crippled and just demoralized and borderline hopeless and how I might help those around me. It was one of those things where it’s like the answer is always in front of you the whole time. I just thought, “That’s what music has always done.”In the sixties, there was a clear cultural intent in that they looked to music as a way to build community, to create connectivity, and to convey the positive sentiment. I mean, all of those songs are about spreading love and positivity. Nine out of ten Beatles songs are about love. So I thought why not explicitly call upon the power of music itself, the stories they tell, and the power of the collective narrative or the community it builds? That’s how the idea for Conspire To Smile was born.L4LM: How do you plan to execute your concept?RG: Regarding execution, I just started socializing the notion with a bunch of my bandmates and my extended community of musicians and musical friends, and everyone was nodding their head in violent agreement. So we all agreed on a core set of tunes, an artistic approach, and a logistical approach. It was hard to plan it all out in advance, but I just kicked it into first gear, and it’s moving.L4LM: Are the tunes chosen for the album originals?RG: No. So the album is called Conspire to Smile. The title track is a brand-new song. The other tracks are covers, but I call them “retold.” The audience will have to deliver the verdict on whether we succeeded or not. But, what we didn’t want to do was create bad covers of good songs, so I tried to do something fresh—whether it’s the instrumentation or the arrangement or the feel, so that the songs have new voices. The album is coming out under Reid Genauer and Folks, but this is the first time Strangefolk has all recorded in the studio since 1998.L4LM: How did that feel?RG: It’s awesome. It has inspired all of us on so many levels. Personally and musically, we choose a weekend to do it, but I know it’s inspired a creative lust. It proved to us that even though we don’t live in the same place right now, we can still make it happen. It was really empowering creatively.L4LM: How many songs will be on the album?RG: At least fourteen, so far: twelve covers and two originals. I intend to release them on a rolling basis when they are ready for free.L4LM: How did you decide what musicians you were going to call on for this project?RG: It was a mixture of things. Some of it was serendipity and who I ran into. Some of it is that I wanted it to not just have it be a “guitarmageddon,” so I have Ryan Mountbleau sing on it, Erik Glockler and Jon Trafton of Strangefolk. I also have Jen Hartswick who is going to sing on it—she has an amazing voice—and Aaron Maxwell from God Street Wine, so partly I was curating based on who was going to crush it vocally. Also, Elliot Peck from Midnight North; she sings like an angel.I was thinking about some other filters too—people with unusual voices who could lend that “other” to it—so that the songs can be retold. Jason Crosby, who has been my bandmate, is an obvious one, plus Scott Metzger and others. That was all part of it, but the other part was that I wanted people who were intimately part of my musical community. Instead of going wide and asking strangers, it’s a coming together for those who are already converted, so to speak.It was important to me that it was a tightknit group, so that the artists were exhibiting behavior that might extend to the audience and beyond. In the back of my head, sure, I would love for it to be a global movement, but my ambition is modest. Let’s say collectively between Strangefolk and Assembly of Dust, we speak directly to 20,000 people, and let’s say ten percent of those people participate—I don’t mean in the Kickstarter, but participate in finding some sense of comfort, orientation, or relief. That’s a win. That’s a huge amount of energy that won’t get wasted, and that can be used towards more productive things.Let’s face it, a lot of the things people are bummed out about are justifiable, but because of social media and its lack of a point of view, some large percent is just this crippling spin that keeps telling the same story. That spin is what prevents you from doing something, whether it’s going for a run or spending time with your family or saving the world. You have to get out of your own way.L4LM: What will the Kickstarter go toward?RG: Well, the musicians all donated their time, but it’s the cost of putting something like this together. What I like about Kickstarter is that inherently you feel emotionally invested in what you have chosen to participate in. That is really what’s most important to me. Why not have people who are investing in the ideal and the collective? I am looking for leaders, not listeners, and that is what Kickstarter does by default, so it is a great platform for something like this.L4ML: Strangefolk played a few dates together this year. Can we expect more from the band in the future?RG: I can’t remember the dates, but the original Strangefolk lineup did not play together, I can’t remember the exact dates for upwards of ten years. In 2012, we did some reunion dates that were intended as a one-off, but it just felt good, so we have toured sporadically since then.L4LM: Is it true that Pete Shapiro left a Disney family vacation for the Strangefolk reunion?RG: [laughs] That I can’t remember, but he put the reunion together. We had hardly spoken in ten years, and Shapiro scheduled a conference call when he was opening The Capitol Theatre. He got us all on a conference call and in Pete Shapiro manner was just like, “Enough of the bullshit. You guys are playing.” He had always been a close friend and a great supporter, so I think we all respected him and felt the logic and enthusiasm in what he was saying. He, like many cool things as of late, deserves the credit for putting us back together.[Photo: Geoff Tischman via Reid Genauer’s Facebook page] Reid Genauer is a songwriter and storyteller best known for his work in Assembly of Dust and Strangefolk. Recently, Genauer has joined forces with a cooperative of musicians—including Jen Hartswick, Elliot Peck, Ryan Montbleau, Jason Crosby, Scott Metzger, and more—for a new studio album, Conspire To Smile. The title track of Conspire To Smile, which has already been released, will be one of at least fourteen songs on the new album, which will feature a handful of new originals plus a number of reimagined covers.In addition to this album from Reid Genauer & Folk, the artist is also starting a social media experiment and has launched a Kickstarter campaign under the Conspire To Smile moniker, with the idea that he can inspire a positive community-building movement that will help take break up the negativity that floods social media. The Kickstarter campaign started on February 1st, with proceeds going toward funding this new project. You can listen to the first tune, the title track of Conspire To Smile, below, plus check out Live For Live Music’s interview with Reid Genauer on Conspire To Smile below.last_img read more

first_imgWhen Tom Wolfe passed away on Monday, the literary world lost one of its most influential minds. Throughout his career, Wolfe tackled the human experiences, manners, and morals of a variety of areas within American culture. His 1979 book, The Right Stuff, captures the bravery and resolve of post-war military test pilots during the beginnings of NASA’s push into outer space. His satirical 1987 novel, The Bonfire of The Vanities, tackled all the vastly varying, endlessly interlocking storylines that make up New York City. From Wall Street suits to Grand Concourse street criminals and everyone in between, Wolfe’s examination of the ripples that emanate from a racially tinged hit-and-run in the Bronx deftly echoed the city’s all-too-real societal ills, despite being a work of fiction. The list goes on and on…Wolfe was a pioneer of “New Journalism,” the more narrative, novelistic style of reporting used by many of the celebrated writers of the 1960’s—a time of cultural revolution and reinvention in American unlike any the country had seen before. As Wolfe explained in his 1973 anthology, The New Journalism:The Sixties was one of the most extraordinary decades in American history in terms of manners and morals. Manners and morals were the history of the Sixties. … A hundred years from now when historians write about the 1960’s in America, they won’t write about it as the decade of war in Vietnam or of space exploration or of political assassinations…but as the decade when manners and morals, styles of living, attitudes toward the world changed the country more crucially than any political events.That notion was never more true than in one of Tom Wolfe’s earliest books, 1968’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. The work of nonfiction still stands today as one of the seminal examples of “New Journalism,” as well as one of the most thematically and descriptively accurate depictions of the burgeoning LSD culture in the mid-’60s.In the book, Tom Wolfe trails author, scholar, and West Coast psychedelic pioneer Ken Kesey and his band of Merry Pranksters as they begin the acid-oriented lifestyle that eventually made them idolized figures in the growing counterculture. Tom’s writing style fit this new lifestyle perfectly, making him ready and able to capture the interactions, emotions, and often fragile mental state of affairs that came along with it. Despite being fully engulfed in the movement and aligned with the Prankster’s philosophy, the book is still hailed for Wolfe’s ability to distinguish between the realities of the Pranksters and Kesey’s experiences and the emotions and actions triggered by their acid-fueled paranoia and disarray.[1965 Acid Test Flier]The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test chronicles the rise of LSD culture with Kesey and the Pranksters as its vessel, from the earliest acid parties thrown on his La Honda, California property to, eventually, the notorious “Acid Tests” for which the book is named. That is where they came in contact with The Grateful Dead, another rising psychedelic institution that truly cut their teeth as improvisational musicians playing at Kesey’s manic Acid Tests.Today, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test stands as one of the most important 60s’ counterculture texts, as it sees Tom Wolfe (now known for his unconventional and uniquely descriptive style of nonfiction reporting) using all his literary power to describe the experience of the Grateful Dead (which would become widely known simply for defying description)–well before either entity was a household name. You can check out several great Tom Wolfe passages about The Grateful Dead and the Acid Tests from The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test below:On The Grateful Dead’s Acid Test PerformancesThose who were … not on the bus … would come to the realization that there was no schedule. The Grateful Dead did not play in sets; no eight numbers to a set, then a twenty-five-minute break, and so on, four or five sets and then the close-out. The Dead might play one number for five minutes or thirty minutes. Who kept time? Who could keep time, with history cut up in slices. The Dead could get just as stoned as anyone else. The … non-attuned would look about and here would be all manner of heads, including those running the show, the Pranksters, stroked out against the walls like slices of Jello. Waiting; with nobody looking very likely to start it back up. Those who didn’t care to wait would tend to drift off, stoned or otherwise, and the test would settle down to the pudding.On The Origins Of Ken Kesey & Jerry Garcia’s RelationshipKesey had hooked up with a rock ‘n’ roll band, The Grateful Dead, led by Jerry Garcia, the same dead-end kid who used to live in the Chateau in Palo Alto … and you had to throw them out when they came over and tried to crash the parties on Perry Lane. Garcia remembered—how they came down and used to get booted out “by Kesey and the wine drinkers.” The wine drinkers—the middle-class bohemians of Perry Lane. They both, Kesey and Garcia, had been heading into the pudding, from different directions, all that time, and now Garcia was a, yes, beautiful person, quiet, into the pudding, and a great guitar player. Garcia had first named his group The Warlocks, meaning sorcerers or wizards, and they had been eking by playing for the beer drinkers, at jazz joints and the like around Palo Alto. To the Warlocks, the beer drinker music, even when called jazz, was just square hip. They were on to that distinction, too. For Kesey–they could just play, do their thing.On Young Jerry Garcia Trying To Have A Real-Life Conversation At The Acid TestsGarcia, for his part, however, doesn’t know which bursts out first, the music or the orange laugh. Out the edges of his eyes he can see his own black hair framing his face—it is so long, to the shoulders, and springs out like a Sudanese soldier’s.On Owsley’s Acid & How The Dead And The Acid Tests Invented “Acid Rock”When the acid scene spread to England in late 1966 and 1967, the hippest intelligence one could pass around was that one was in possession of “Owsley acid.” In the acid world, this was bottled-in-bond; certified; guaranteed; and high status. It was in this head world that the … Beatles first took LSD. … Through The Dead’s experience with the Pranksters was born the sound known as “acid rock.” And it was that sound that the Beatles picked up on, after they started taking acid, to do a famous series of acid-rock record albums, Revolver, Rubber Soul, and Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.On The Influential Effects Of The Acid Tests & The Grateful Dead On Media Consumption“Mixed media” entertainment—this came straight out of the Acid Tests’ combination of light and movie projections, strobes, tapes, rock n’ roll, black light. “Acid rock”—the sound of the Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper album and the high-vibrato electronic sounds of the Jefferson Airplane, the Mothers of Invention and many other groups—the mothers of it all were the Grateful Dead at the Acid Tests. The Dead were the audio counterpart of Roy Seburn‘s light projections. Owsley was responsible for some of this, indirectly. Owsley had snapped back from his great Freakout and started pouring money into the Grateful Dead and, thereby, the Tests.Maybe he figured the Tests were the wave of the future… Maybe he thought “acid rock” was the sound of the future and he would become a kind of Brian Epstein for the Grateful Dead. I don’t know. In any case, he started buying the Dead equipment such as no rock n’ roll band ever had before, the Beatles included, all manner of tuners, amplifiers, receivers, loudspeakers, microphones, cartridges, tapes, theater horns, booms, lights, turntables, instruments, mixers, muters, servile mesochroics, whatever was on the market. The sound went down on so many microphones and hooked through so many mixers and variable lags and blew up in so many amplifiers and roiled around in so many speakers and fed back down so many microphones, it came on like a chemical refinery. There was something wholly new and deliriously weird in the Dead’s sound, and practically everything new in rock ‘n’ roll, rock jazz I have heard it called, came out of it.Rest in peace, Tom Wolfe. To purchase The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and read more about Tom Wolfe’s adventures with Ken Kesey, the Merry Pranksters, and the Grateful Dead, head here.last_img read more