Month: June 2021

first_imgBuilt on an excellent team spirit with no international stars, the team made great strides with the pack a highly competitive unit and the backs clinical and dangerous.Check out March 2011’s School Team of the MonthThis article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.center_img Back (l-r): B Houston, S Allen, E McGuire, S Sharp, G Wright, J Lowcoc, S Hulley. Middle: M Stephenson, D Teesdale, R Knowles, L Hogan, A Scatchard, W Martin, C Murphy, F Cartwright, J Kettel, M Cook, Mr G Pickersgill. Front: J Charleswort, O Ufodiama, J Allott (capt), Mr T Barker, T Pickersgill, P Goodwill, A Sharp.QEGS WAKEFIELD pick up our monthly award ahead of the Independent Schools Barbarians.The Wakefield school weren’t expected to stand out this year, so their performance in getting all the way to the quarter-finals of the Daily Mail RBS Schools Cup was a tremendous effort. After wins over Silcoates, Mount St Mary’s, Stonyhurst, Hymers and Merchant Taylors’ Crosby, the run ended at Wilmslow HS.QEGS completed their fourth season unbeaten at home, the last home loss being in January 2007 against St Ambrose College. Outside the cup, the team went down only once when a heavily depleted XV lost 25-15 at Loughborough GS.Yorkshire U18 centre Joe Allott was an excellent captain and was brilliantly supported by No 8 Olisa Ufodiama, prop Piers Goodwill and hooker Tim Pickersgill, on and off the field.The best wins came in the cup against Hymers and Merchant Taylors’, as well as successes at RGS Lancaster(8-3), Woodhouse Grove (17-3) and Nottingham HS (24-8), and at home to St Peters York (41-8). There was also an exciting 15-15 draw with King’s Macclesfield.last_img read more

first_imgThe final weekend of the 2014-15 season in the UK and Ireland featured two league finals, a European Champions Cup qualifying showdown and a run-out for England against the Barbarians. Who cast the spells to magic up the silverware, and who fluffed their lines on the big stage? Unstoppable: Leone Nakarawa ran Munster ragged in the Guinness Pro12 final (Photo: Inpho)Lock opens the door for GlasgowWhen Gregor Townsend handed Leone Nakarawa the No 4 jersey instead of Al Kellock before Saturday’s Pro12 final, he told him: “I just want you going forward. I will be very happy if you don’t make an off-load today.” The Fijian certainly went forward, eating up metres of the Kingspan Stadium turf on several occasions, but he added some magnificent off-loads into the bargain and was instrumental in Glasgow Warriors building up a 21-3 lead from which even the mighty Munster could not recover. Oh brother! Farrell celebrates at Twickenham with his brother Gabriel. (Photo: PA). Grinning Gregor: Townsend and the Pro12 trophy in the victors’ changing room. (Photo: Inpho)Gregor the greatGlasgow Warriors turned the heartbreak of last season’s 34-12 Pro12 final loss on its head by comprehensively defeating Munster 31-13 in this year’s showpiece to become the first Scottish professional team to claim a major trophy.The new Guinness Pro12 champions have plenty of heroes in their ranks, but chief among them is head coach Gregor Townsend, who has taken the Warriors steadily up the rankings in the last few years, stacking improvement upon improvement until they were ready to claim their reward on Saturday evening.He used 52 players in this season’s campaign, which shows how good he is at man-management and employing his resources skilfully. He is not afraid to take the tough decision either – as he showed by starting Glasgow hero Al Kellock on the bench in his last match for the side before he retires.Townsend had plenty of flair in his playing days and likes to see the same from the team he coaches, which is great for spectators and players like. He and his team have conquered the Pro12. Now they need to kick on and rule Europe. The SinnersBad timingThe Aviva Premiership final was a wonderful occasion at a sun-kissed Twickenham but one part of the venue let the side down – the stadium clock. As the last four minutes of the final began, the clock which the players and 80,589 supporters rely upon, stopped working. Referee Wayne Barnes had to tell the teams to ignore it and he gave them regular time up-dates for the remainder of the game. Bath had enough on their plates, trying to close a 12-point gap on the scoreboard, without being uncertain about how much time was left.BT Sport’s TV viewers were also without a clock from the 76th minute to the 78th, but the on-screen clock was restored to working order for the last 90 seconds. Replay leads to rethinkBath’s medics and management looked to be heading for the Sinners bench when they allowed Anthony Watson to play on for five minutes after he was seemingly knocked out by Owen Farrell’s high tackle in the early stages of the Aviva Premiership final, but it turns out they made excellent use of the facilities for detecting head injuries and took a brave decision which deprived their team of a key player in a massive match, for the good of that player.High hit: Anthony Watson is floored by Owen Farrell and Mako Vunipola. (Photo: Getty Images)The medics who attended to Watson on the pitch did not see the contact with Farrell. The full-back passed their initial checks to his head and neck, so they allowed him to play on – but when they left the pitch they took a look at the video footage pitch-side.That showed them Watson might have been knocked out, and Bath brought him off at the next available opportunity for a proper Head Injury Assessment, from which he did not return.As a Bath club statement said: “We take all potential head and concussion related injuries very seriously, and player welfare is of paramount importance to the Club.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The SaintsStand-out stand-offHe helped himself to 18 points in a 28-16 victory, controlled the tactics and tempo with a superb kicking game and won the Peter Deakin Medal for the Man of the Match in the Aviva Premiership final, so Owen Farrell deserves his place among the Saints.Deposed from the England team by his opposite number in this final, George Ford, Farrell showed the battle for the national No 10 jersey is well and truly on as the World Cup build-up begins in earnest.He scored Saracens’ first try, cleverly pushing the ball across to Duncan Taylor to stretch the Bath defence and then dummying his way past Matt Banahan and over the line.Some might expect Farrell to be among the Sinners for his high tackle in the second minute which put Anthony Watson out of the game, but at the time I felt it warranted no more than a penalty and although Farrell was given a warning by the Citing Commissioner, he will not face a hearing and a ban. TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsSaracens Cip, Cip, hooray!When your team wins 73-12 there is bound to be a few Saints among your number and that is certainly true for the England XV which defeated the Barbarians so comprehensively at Twickenham on Sunday.Chief among them was fly-half Danny Cipriani, although Henry Slade, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Marland Yarde and hat-trick scorer Christian Wade were also impressive.Dan dares: Cipriani dives over for his second try in an excellent performance. (Photo: Getty Images)It was Cipriani who earned the Man of the Match award though, thanks to his marshaling of England’s back line and his flawless goal-kicking which saw him land 11 shots out of 11, from all kinds of angles. The Sale playmaker ended up with 33 points to his name as he also scored England’s sixth and tenth tries and he enhanced the good impression he must have been making on Stuart Lancaster by switching happily to full-back for a spell of the second half – something he need to be able to do if he is to make England’s World Cup squad. Up for the cup: Dave Strettle (left) shone in the Aviva Premiership final. (Photo: Getty Images)Skills to pay the billsHalf an hour into the Aviva Premiership final, Saracens were already looking good for their 15-3 lead, then a superb piece of skill from Dave Strettle extended that advantage to 22-3. Duncan Taylor intercepted and offloaded superbly to send the ball towards the wing. It was too far in front of Strettle for him to catch, but he stretched out a foot, daintily chipped the ball up into his own hands and a few seconds later Chris Wyles was strolling over the line on the left for a valuable try.It was far from being Strettle’s only important contribution to the win. He made a try-saving tackle on Kyle Eastmond ten minutes into the second half and made a total of 71 metres in attack for Saracens. Earlier in the month Tuilagi pleaded guilty at Leicester Magistrates Court to three counts of assault and was ordered to pay £6,205 in fines and compensation. That cost him a place in England’s World Cup squad. Speeding is a much more common crime and perceived as less serious, but the timing is still terrible for a player should be thinking deeply about his every move at the moment. Heart-breaker: Pierre Bernard (centre) kicked Bordeaux-Begles to victory. (Photo: Getty Images)Kicked in the teethSinners are thin on the ground this week and, as a Gloucester fan, the temptation to include Bordeaux-Begles fly-half Pierre Bernard for breaking west-country and English hearts is overwhelming!Bernard kicked the 81st-minute drop-goal which enable the French side to snatch a 23-22 win over Gloucester in the European Champions Cup play-off and take the 20th and final spot in next season’s premier European tournament. The referee was playing a penalty advantage so the drop-goal opportunity was a classic “shot to nothing” but it was a still a magnificent kick from outside the 22 and (in my one-eyed opinion) it was undoubtedly the worst moment of a weekend of great rugby.But seriously, perhaps Greig Laidlaw should be a Sinner for opting to tap-and-go with a penalty from just inside the ten-metre line and 15 metres in from the left, when Gloucester trailed 20-19 with 20 minutes to go? Yes, it was against the wind but it must have been worth a shot for the mighty boot of James Hook. There were plenty of other Gloucester villains too – John Afoa for throwing a pass behind Rob Cook with the try-line looming, Richard Hibbard for failing to pass outside to Charlie Sharples for another great try-scoring chance, and the Gloucester team in general for letting a 19-3 lead slip. Take your pick.But while I sulk and blame Bernard, I will console myself with the fact that at least Gloucester will have a chance to defend their European Challenge Cup next season. In the first half alone, Nakarawa beat five defenders with seven carries and off-loaded three times, creating two tries in the process. With just eight minutes gone he broke across the 22, stepping through and around three would-be tacklers and then, when he was finally halted, he shoveled the ball out to Robert Harley who dived in for the first try. Around 17 minutes later Nakarawa took a pass from Gordon Reid and although he only made a handful of yards this time, he took four defenders out of the game and created the space for DTH van der Merwe to extend Glasgow’s lead. The Fijian lock was involved in several of the 13 phases of close-range play which led up to Finn Russell‘s second-half try too, and he won his share of lineout ball on the day.Nakarawa has shown he can be a winner with the Warriors. Can he do the same with Fiji in the World Cup? England and Wales beware! Double troubleManu Tuilagi will be glad to see the back of May 2015. He ended the month in trouble with the police for the second time – banned from driving for 56 days after being caught speeding at an average of 81mph on the A1 and reaching the critical level of 12 points on his driving licence. He was also fined £1,000 by the magistrates at Northallerton.last_img read more

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Postponed: The Olympic logo at the new National Stadium built for the Tokyo Games (Getty Images) The Tokyo Games will take place over the same period as the Test series in South Africa New @Tokyo2020 olympic dates now published. Will be interesting to see if it effects SA team and prep for Tokyo or Lions tour depending on their priority. They had three full springbok caps in Rio squad (De Jongh, Hougaard and Kolbe) plus the then soon to be capped Kwagga Smith.— Ben Ryan (@benjaminryan) March 30, 2020 New Olympic dates clash with Lions tourThe IOC has confirmed that the Tokyo Olympic Games will now take place from Friday 23 July to Sunday 8 August 2021.The Games had been due to take place this summer but were postponed last week because of the coronavirus pandemic. Now the Olympics will clash with the British & Irish Lions tour to South Africa and specifically the team’s Test series against the world champions.In charge: Warren Gatland is Lions head coach for a third time (Getty Images)Warren Gatland’s side play their first tour match on Saturday 3 July against the Stormers – three weeks before the Olympics starts. However, all three Test matches against the Springboks will take place at the same time as the Olympics is on – 24 and 31 July and 7 August.The fact the events are taking place in different time zones is likely to minimise any clash in broadcast schedules, but there are other issues to consider.One is selection. Any 15s players from South Africa or the home nations who were contemplating switching to sevens for Tokyo 2020 will now have to decide whether they want to play in a Lions series or an Olympics because they won’t be able to do both.On the attack: Cheslin Kolbe breaks in the World Cup final (Getty Images)Mark Bennett and James Davies switched from 15s to sevens to be part of Team GB’s silver medal-winning sevens squad in 2016, for instance, although both would be long shots for Lions 2021 selection.SA Rugby magazine reports that Springboks Cheslin Kolbe and Kwagga Smith were planning to make themselves available for selection for the Blitzboks for the Games, but may now have to rethink things. After all, a Lions tour to South Africa happens only once every 12 years. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS There may be supporters who had booked to go to the Olympics and on the Lions tour, too, so they will have to decide which event to experience live.Another issue is sponsors. The Lions is a huge commercial entity but sponsorship deals could be affected now the tour is in competition with the Olympics, particularly as it also overlaps with the rescheduled Euro 2020 football tournament (11 June to 11 July 2021).With three huge events competing for media coverage, it could impact the value of sponsorship deals.The women’s game could be even more affected by the new Olympic dates, where there is far more crossover between sevens and 15s.Fast show: Portia Woodman in action for the Black Ferns Sevens (Getty Images)Keira Bevan, for example, is in the Team GB training squad but is also Wales’ first-choice scrum-half. Portia Woodman was the top try-scorer at RWC 2017 with 13 but is also a star performer for the Black Ferns Sevens.Next year’s World Cup kicks off on 18 September in New Zealand – only a six-week turnaround from the Olympics, which could make it hard for players to compete in both events given the time it can take to adapt between the two codes.Players face some tough decisions over the next year.last_img read more

first_img Sale’s Manu Tuilagi sustained an Achilles injury in September 2020 (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition for magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Manu Tuilagi talks comebacks, salsa and the LionsSale Sharks and England centre Manu Tuilagi is ‘hiding’ from his three-year-old daughter Leilani Lea’auta in his bedroom. “I had to distract her with Mini Eggs so I could do this interview!” he laughs.The relaxed and warm Tuilagi on the video call is a stark contrast to the powerful and commanding presence he is on the pitch. And the 29-year-old reveals that fans should get to see him play again in four to five weeks’ time as he nears the end of his recovery from an Achilles injury sustained back in September.“I’m looking forward to progressing now, getting in some more running for the next two to three weeks,” he says. “Then back with the team for a couple of weeks before playing.“I guess the good thing about being injured is you can keep learning about the game. From watching the game, to just analyse and see how the game is played; how it’s moved on and how can I be better when I come back.”While he maintains an ‘it is what it is’ mindset, Tuilagi admits being injured again has been tough. In a bid to make his rehab entertaining, the staff at Sale suggested some different activities for him to do – hiking and salsa dancing amongst them.Manu Tuilagi has started running again (WOW HYDRATE)While he enjoys dancing, he quickly shuts down any suggestion of an appearance on Strictly Come Dancing.“No way! The boys have already given me some banter. It’s good fun. But definitely not that. It’ll be for my wife and I to dance at home, that will be nice.“The guys at Sale are really good; the medical team, the physios, the S&Cs. Nav (physiotherapist Navdeep Singh Sandhu), the guy that looks after me, he came up with the idea of walking before you run. So for me to be able to run again we did the hiking. I never really enjoyed walking so with the first walk, a long, long walk up the hills, I said to Nav, ‘Is this what people do for fun and relaxation?’”Despite not taking to the new hobby at first, after two walks he was hooked, describing hikes in the Peak District near where he lives as beautiful.He continues: “Sometimes rehab can become a bit boring when you do the same things; you stand in the gym doing calf raises all day. It’s a great way to mix it up. Even though you’re injured, you’re still enjoying the process of coming back to play. So the guys at Sale have really looked after me and come up with ideas to keep it fun and I’m really getting into salsa now as well!” Now he cannot wait to get back on the pitch. The last time he pulled on a Sharks shirt Steve Diamond was head coach and when Tuilagi returns it will be new boss Alex Sanderson in charge.“Obviously Dimes was a big part of Sale and a big part of why I moved here. (I was) so gutted for Dimes (the coach left the club for personal reasons in December) but I guess that’s how rugby is and sport is these days.“The transition has been really good. Alex has come in and fit straight in, quite seamless as well. The boys are enjoying it and I think we’re going in the right direction.”He says Sanderson is trying to set standards for players and back-room staff alike. Tuilagi’s main focus is returning to play before the end of the season and helping the team push for the Gallagher Premiership trophy.“We are in a good spot at the moment and of course we want to win, if I say we didn’t want to win I’d be lying. So the thing for us is just focus on the next game.”Tuilagi injured his Achilles last September (Getty Images)There has also been a lot of talk about whether Tuilagi will be in contention for Warren Gatland’s British and Irish Lions squad this summer.Gatland will announce the squad in early May, just as Tuilagi is returning to play, and the star chuckles as he is asked about his ambition to get a spot.“Everyone is asking me this question,” he says. “For me, I just want to get back playing, as simple as that. I take it day-by-day, just making sure I’m good.“Making sure my rehab is good today, my running is good, then my focus will be on the next day. So for me it’s focusing on getting my running in and then focusing on getting back and playing for Sale.” The Sale and England centre is set to return to action in four to five weekslast_img read more

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Relief & Development to make child survival a priority Children, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jun 14, 2012 Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN center_img Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Episcopal Relief & Development] Episcopal Relief & Development is participating in the Child Survival Call to Action event being held in Washington, DC, on June 14-15. Convened by the governments of the United States, India and Ethiopia, in collaboration with UNICEF, this high-level forum brings together an array of public and private constituencies to identify smart investments that will help end preventable child deaths.Episcopal Relief & Development is one of over 50 partners signing on to the Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed pledge, which commits the agency to promoting ten health-related behaviors that can help parents and guardians protect the lives of children in their care. These include breastfeeding all newborns through the age of six months, immunizing children through the age of two years, providing clean drinking water and sanitation facilities, and having children sleep under mosquito nets in malaria-endemic areas.The organization is signing onto the pledge as a faith-based organization, through Religions for Peace and the Center for Interfaith Action.Working through local Church partners in 30 countries, Episcopal Relief & Development promotes health and fights disease by increasing access to prevention education, medical care and clean water. The organization trains community volunteers to provide education and basic health monitoring, supports hospitals and mobile medical clinics, and installs water and sanitation systems to prevent waterborne illnesses. In addition, Episcopal Relief & Development’s NetsforLife® program partnership provides mosquito nets and training to help prevent malaria, which is a leading cause of death of children under five. All of these activities support at least one of the target behaviors outlined in the Committed to Child Survival pledge.In connection with its maternal and child health programs, Episcopal Relief & Development is facilitating a number of efforts that further establish child health and survival as a priority. For example, the organization’s partner in Zambia, the Zambia Anglican Council (ZAC), recently added child survival elements to two of its existing programs. To increase immunization coverage among young children in rural areas, ZAC is introducing cold chain storage at 74 health clinics and broadening its network of health volunteers to intensify vaccine promotion at the grassroots level. ZAC is also expanding its program for orphans and vulnerable children who have been impacted by HIV/AIDS, to include early childhood development components that address the health and psychosocial needs of very young children and their caregivers. This latter program utilizes the Essential Package strategy developed by Save the Children and CARE, and is funded through a generous grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation.“Episcopal Relief & Development is very pleased to be participating in the shaping of strategies that increase child survival, both with our local partners and with our peer organizations,” said Rob Radtke, the organization’s President. “Acting in partnership toward a common goal is the best way to ensure that the global community can make significant gains in safeguarding the health and wellbeing of all children.” Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Relief & Development, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Poverty & Hunger last_img read more

first_img Ecumenical & Interreligious, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Refugees Migration & Resettlement Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Immigration, By Janet KawamotoPosted Mar 5, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Advocacy for immigration reform takes LA faith leaders to border Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York A member of the Los Angeles Council of Religious Leaders talks with Oscar, who grew up in the Los Angeles area but came to Mexico a year and a half ago with his parents, who were deported. The family now lives in Chilpancingo, a shantytown near Tijuana. Photo: Janet Kawamoto[Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles] A group of some 25 interfaith leaders from Los Angeles traveled to San Diego and crossed the border to Tijuana Feb. 26 and 27 to learn more about how U.S. immigration policies affect the poor of Mexico. And learn they did, with a punch that left them determined to find ways to encourage effective immigration reform.The group, which included Bishop Suffragan Mary D. Glasspool of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles, represented the Los Angeles Council of Religious Leaders (LACRL), and was led by Rabbi Mark Diamond, council president and regional director of AJC-LA, a local branch of a global Jewish advocacy organization.The travelers also included clergy and lay representatives from the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, the California-Pacific conference of the United Methodist Church, the Southern California – Nevada Conference of the United Church of Christ, and the Presbytery of the Pacific of the Presbyterian Church.Beginning the first day’s presentations, Diamond reminded the LACRL group that the Old Testament constantly commands the Hebrews – and Christians — to welcome the stranger. He quoted Leviticus 19:33-34: “When a stranger resides with you in your land, you shall not wrong him. The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as one of your citizens; you shall love him as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. I am the Lord and your God.”Although there is a wide variety of opinions in the U.S. political arena on the complicated topic of immigration, Diamond said, “in 2013 we have a real shot at comprehensive immigration reform.”Carmen M. Chavez, an immigration attorney and executive director of Casa Cornelia Law Center, a Roman Catholic ministry in San Diego that deals with immigration issues, agreed.“I think for the first time my colleagues, not only at Casa Cornelia, but in the practice of immigration law, both the private and the nonprofit sector, for the first time in a long time are talking about immigration reform as if it might finally happen this time,” she told the religious leaders.“We don’t know what it’s going to look like, but I do have to say that it’s going to stretch all of us,” she said, pointing out that implementing any new policy is going to take many years.The role of faith communities in finding humane, workable solutions will be huge, she said.“It will be the faith community – as it always has – that will be at the people’s call when they need help and they need a helping hand. It will also be the faith community that will bring, hopefully, not only civility but a level of being open to the reality of this migration, which is a global migration.”Casa Cornelia works with those who seek asylum in the United States because of persecution in their home countries. It also serves victims of domestic violence, as well as unaccompanied children who try to cross the border. Most are boys between the ages of 14 and 16, but Casa Cornelia has served children as young as 2 years old.Seeking asylum“Carlos,” who fled his native Nicaragua to avoid persecution, told the L.A. group that he was detained in a facility run by the Corrections Corporation of American (CCA), a for-profit group that runs some U.S. prisons.“I came to save my life, and what I found was a jail,” he said, speaking through an interpreter.In the United States, Casa Cornelia attorney Elizabeth A. Lopez explained, immigration law is administrative law, not criminal law, and undocumented migrants – even children – are not entitled to a lawyer to plead their immigration cases. A few are able to find low-cost or free legal services provided by charitable or religious organizations. Others attempt to represent themselves.Carlos, who had no financial resources and no legal counsel, acted as his own advocate. The prison had a small, out-of-date library without Internet access, and it was there that Carlos attempted to work out a defense against being deported. He was allowed only five hours each week in the library – often cut to three.Although he spoke no English and had no representation, Carlos was able to make his case. Although he was not granted formal asylum, he was able to remain legally in the United States. “Thank God,” he said, “the judge understood that if I returned to my country, I would die.“With the few resources I had, I was able to prove that I had credibility and that I needed to stay in the United States.”“Carlos represents the majority of asylum seekers and immigrants who do not have the funds to hire an attorney,” said Lopez, who added that only 3 percent of those who attempt self-representation succeed in gaining legal U.S. residency. “He is well-spoken, able to articulate his case. Most do not have his advantages.”Lopez also mentioned that private prisons are a huge growth industry, with a strong lobbying presence in Washington, D.C., she said. They want immigration law to be stricter and more punitive, she said, so that they will have more prisoners in order to make more money.Witnesses on the border“As we move closer to the wall you will see the border patrol protecting us from the Mexican people,” the Rev. Carlos Correa Bernier of the United Church of Christ told the LACRL visitors as they traveled across the U.S.-Mexico border into Tijuana.“Thank God,” he added, with an ironic laugh.Heavy metal mesh placed over the grid of the wall in “Friendship Park” prevents all physical contact and most visual contact between the U.S. and Mexican sides of the border. Some 50 feet away on the U.S. side is a second fence that is opened only for brief periods on weekends to allow those on either side of the wall to talk to their families and friends on the other side. Photo: Janet KawamotoCorrea Bernier is associate minister for border and Latino ministries for the UCC’s Southern California – Nevada Conference, and executive director of the Romero Center, an immigration ministry located in San Ysidro, California. The Romero Center works with migrant workers on both sides of the border and offers immersion experiences for those who want to understand immigration issues better.As the group gazed at a portion of the wall, Correa Bernier noted that such barriers are an ineffective means of border control, because if they can be built, they can be breached or avoided.“I have seen pictures of a minivan going over the wall – they build tracks on either side of the border,” he said. “As they say, if you have a wall 50 feet high, all you need is a 51-foot ladder.“So the policy of building walls is not working. It never worked. It’s not going to work.”Correa Bernier outlined for the group the difficulties facing those who want to enter the United States, as well as those who have been deported.He guided the group to an area within a mile or so of the border where they saw dozens of enormous factories called by the Mexican Spanish word “maquiladoras,” meaning “bonded assembly plant.” In these windowless buildings, young Mexican women, working under male supervisors, assemble various goods that go directly to the American market.The women, Correa Bernier said, work for a few dollars a day, six days a week. They are not permitted work breaks; their pay is docked for any time spent in a restroom or eating lunch. They are subject to losing their jobs when they turn 30, he said; the official reason is that the managers believe they are no longer able to keep up with the work, much of which is making wide-screen televisions and other electronic goods for the American market. Women are also subject to termination if they become pregnant.Asked why the companies could not be forced to supply better wages and working conditions, Correa Bernier had a one-word answer: NAFTA.The North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement, he explained, allows companies to exploit cheap labor in Mexico to build their goods. Any company that raises wages will have to raise its prices to compensate, and few are willing to do so in the extremely competitive U.S. markets. On paper, the companies are responsible for treating their workers well, but enforcement is very lax, Correa Bernier said.“Our position at the Romero Center is that the U.S. doesn’t need a free trade agreement,” he said. “We need a fair trade agreement.”He added, “People work in the maquiladoras, really, to maintain my lifestyle in the United States, because I want all my stuff to be cheap and available.“As my father used to say, no one is guilty, and everyone is responsible.”A town of despairAn especially emotional moment for the religious leaders was a visit to Chilpancingo, a shantytown that appears on no map, but is home to thousands of people who tried to cross the border into the U.S. illegally, or have been deported, and are now stuck there, with not enough funds to travel anywhere else. Some of them work in the maquiladoras located nearby, but jobs are generally scarce.Chilpancingo is reached by crossing a cement-lined bed that channels the Tijuana river. Correa Bernier said he has seen the water change color from toxic chemicals released by the factories. As the group looked across the river at some 10,000 shacks built from scraps of wood and metal, they saw children playing by the polluted water. There is no school in the area, Correa Bernier said; in any case, these children would be unable to afford the fees required by public as well as private schools.“The kids are abandoned during the day, because Mom and Dad are working,” he said. “They are exposed to drugs, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical abuse and so on. So it’s a vicious cycle.”A young man who lives in Chilpancingo who was walking nearby with his wife and daughter told the group that he had grown up in South-Central Los Angeles from the time he was a toddler, and had been recently deported. In fluent English, he explained that he had been sent to prison, though he denied any wrongdoing.“I took the rap for someone else,” he said.He is barely 24, he said. He had papers, he said, but they were taken from him and he was deported to Mexico after his prison term. His parents are still in Los Angeles, he said, with his five brothers and a sister, U.S. citizens.He explained that the only work he has found is cockfighting. “I can’t get a job because of my tattoos and stuff. Getting a job is hard.”“It’s hard here,” he said.A member of the group also struck up a conversation with Oscar, a boy of about eight years, who explained that he had lived in the United States all his life, but came to Mexico with his parents when they were deported.Speaking in English, he said that he wanted to go to school, but his mother and father had no money to send him or his siblings. He has tried to keep up his studies in the year and a half since they came to Tijuana, but he finds it difficult.“What do you do all day?” the group member asked.Without irony, Oscar responded that they “clean house.” He pointed out his family’s home, which like all the houses in Chilpancingo is constructed of found objects.Would he like to return to the United States?Yes, he said without hesitation, but not without his family. Life is hard in Chilpancingo, he said.“It hasn’t been a good experience,” he added wistfully.House of the PoorThe LACRL group stopped at Casa de Las Pobres – the House of the Poor – a ministry run by four Roman Catholic nuns who provide food, assistance and medical care for the poor of Tijuana, many of whom are migrants. They once provided three meals a day, but have been forced by economics to cut back to breakfast only. They also supply bags of food, much of it donated by grocery stores in San Diego.Bishop Suffragan Mary D. Glasspool of the Diocese of Los Angeles, with Fr. Alexei Smith, ecumenical and interreligious officer for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, and United Church of Christ minister Carlos Correa Bernier, executive director of the Romero Center, confer with one of the four nuns who operate Casa de Las Pobras (House of the Poor), a ministry to the destitute of Tijuana. A group of some 25 religious leaders from the Los Angeles visited San Diego and Tijuana on Feb. 26 and 27 to learn about the effects of U.S. immigration policy on the poor of Mexico, and begin to determine how they might work for effective, comprehensive immigration reform. Photo: Janet KawamotoCorrea Bernier, who has had a longtime working relationship with the Las Pobres, told a story of visiting the facility, where he encountered one of the sisters, who was frantic because they were ready to serve a meal, but had no tortillas (a major staple of life in Mexico). Correa Bernier showed them what he had brought them; a truckload of donated tortillas.Correa Bernier interpreted as one of the sisters told the group that the ministry gets “only small support” from the church.“Our supporters are the angels and the people that work here, and the providence of God,” she said.The LACRL group made a final stop at what Correa Bernier calls “No-Longer-Friendship-Park.” He explained that a few years ago the wall was more open, and people could meet and touch their friends and relatives on the other side of the border. In recent years it has been blocked by a heavy interlocked mesh that prevents all direct contact.Returning to San Diego, members of the group felt the enormity of the task of immigration reform, but were determined to work together to find ways to ease the human suffering of immigrants.“First and foremost, we can show people that this is not an Episcopal issue, a Catholic issue, a Jewish issue, but it’s a human issue,” said Fr. Alexei Smith, who serves as interfaith and ecumenical officer for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. “With all these faith traditions that we have represented on this trip, we can give a unified witness to the truth of what we face, what we need to do.“I think we have to start looking at people humanely,” Smith continued. “We have to recognize that each of us is created in the image and likeness of God, and for us from a Christian point of view, in that wonderful gospel of the last judgment, Jesus quite clearly says, I was a stranger and you welcomed me; I was a stranger and you didn’t welcome me – and we know the consequences. And I think we have to live that.“I think that the focus ought to be on getting legislation on radical immigration reform,” said Bishop Glasspool of the Diocese of Los Angeles. “One of the things that I learned again was we’re in it for the long haul. It’s not just a matter of writing a law or passing some resolutions. It’s a long process. Even as I heard hopefulness, particularly from the staff of Casa Cornelia, around the possibility of legislative action in the calendar year 2013, I hear also that it’s going to be eight years in effecting changes that are initially articulated through the law.“Which makes it all the more urgent to pass the law as soon as possible, because it’s going to take time to change the way we do things.”— Janet Kawamoto is editor of The Episcopal News, publication of the Diocese of Los Angeles. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Comments (1) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA October 22, 2013 at 5:53 pm How wonderful to read about Apb. Welby meeting with the GAFCON primates! News from there is exciting, filled with the Holy Spirit. The “East African Revival” continues, and is spreading across the globe. The global south Anglican Church offers a vigorous witness to the Power and Authority it has received from Christ. The Gospel is exploding in the Global South in spite of “dangers, snares and toils.” May a spark blow across the waves…. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Africa, Charlotte Rundell says: Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Lambeth Palace staffPosted Oct 22, 2013 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Archbishop of Canterbury visits Nairobi An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing [Lambeth Palace] Archbishop Justin preached in Nairobi Oct. 20 during a visit in the wake of the Westgate mall attack last month.He was a guest of Archbishop of Kenya Eliud Wabukala.During a sermon at All Saints Cathedral, the archbishop said the pain endured by people had been “very great,” adding that Kenya had responded to the attack with “faith and courage.”The archbishop was visiting Kenya to offer condolence and solidarity following the attack, while encouraging Archbishop Eliud and other bishops and clergy ministering around the Nairobi area.Following his sermon, Welby had lunch with Wabukala, five Kenyan bishops and those Anglican primates who had arrived early in Nairobi for the Global Anglican Future Conference (GAFCON), which starts Oct. 21.The archbishop was unable to attend the conference due to a prior engagement in Iceland and the baptism of Prince George in London, but has sent a video greeting.‘A new way of being together’Preaching on Hebrews 13:1-10 and the Acts 6:1-7, the archbishop spoke about divisions within the church.While differences have always and will always exist, he said, the church throughout its history has failed to settle them in a way that “points to Jesus.”The issues currently dividing the Anglican Communion highlight the need for “a new way of being together” that reflects the 21st century, he said, rather than “the old colonial pattern.”These new structures – which would only be discovered through “discernment, wisdom, and above all prayer and searching the scriptures” – must not be “for ourselves or our own satisfaction or power or ambition.”Instead, as in the Acts, they must support the work of declaring the Gospel and bringing people to faith in Christ, he said.Those who lead the communion must have “worship and mission and witness and evangelism as their aims and passion,” he continued.The more serious the crisis the church faces, he said, the more seriously we must take the Bible. “Through the Bible you come back to face God, in sorrow, in despair, in hope, in anger, in loss.”The archbishop ended his sermon by describing what the community that follows Jesus looks like.“It avoids the great areas of sin that tempt all of us, in all our cultures in different ways,” he said.The writer of Hebrews, addressing a persecuted people, might have been expected to offer advice on defense, he said. But instead he gave them “advice on holiness” – in particular on avoiding abuse of power, sexual sin, and love of money.“A church that will flourish, a people that will find God as faithful, base themselves in the Bible, that endless store of riches, and in holiness of lifestyle, the practical life of Christian obedience,” he said. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Archbishop of Canterbury Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

first_imgAnglican-Old Catholic International Co-ordinating Council communiqué Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Sep 3, 2014 Anglican Communion, [Anglican Communion Office] The Anglican-Old Catholic International Co-ordinating Council (AOCICC) met in Kilkenny, Ireland, from 27 to 30 August 2014.This was the second meeting of the Council in its present round.Major tasks of this meeting included:Editing of a booklet which introduces AOCICC’s 2011 paper on Ecclesiology and Mission (Belonging Together in Europe) for the faithful of both communions;Consideration of how to develop further concrete proposals for the common mission of the Anglican and Old Catholic Churches on the European continent;Updating each other about developments within each Communion, including plans for the upcoming International Old Catholic Congress which will mark the 125th anniversary of the Union of Utrecht of the Old Catholic Churches;Briefing each other about developments in the bilateral ecumenical relationships in which each Communion is engaged.A special session of the Council was devoted to engaging with representatives of European institutions in Ireland, to understand better the possibilities for engagement and witness in Europe; particularly how to take advantage of the opportunities for consultation afforded the Churches under the EU treaties.The Council prayed and studied the Bible daily and, having visited the St Willibrord exhibition in Carlow, celebrated the Eucharist at Leighlin Cathedral together with members of the Church of Ireland.The Council is grateful to the Diocese of Cashel, Ferns and Ossory for its hospitality, the Dean and parishioners of Leighlin, and especially to Bishop Michael Burrows and his family, who welcomed the Council into their home for the meeting.The Council wishes to record its gratitude to Canon Dr Alyson Barnett-Cowan for her distinguished contribution to its work over the last five years, and assures her of its prayers for the future.The Council will meet again in Zurich, Switzerland 26–30 May 2015For further information, please contact the Revd Lars Simpson +41 44 211 12 76, [email protected]; or Canon Dr Alyson Barnett-Cowan at the Anglican Communion Office, +44 20 7313 3930, [email protected] at the meeting:AnglicansThe Rt Revd Michael Burrows, Co-chairThe Revd Jennifer Adams-MassmanThe Rt Revd David HamidMrs Jennifer KnudsenCanon Dr Alyson Barnett-Cowan, Co-secretaryMr Neil Vigers, Anglican Communion OfficeOld CatholicsThe Rt Revd Dr Dirk Jan Schoon, Co-chairThe Revd Professor Dr Angela BerlisThe Revd Professor Dr David R Holeton The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tagslast_img read more

first_imgEastern Oregon diocese announces 3 nominees for bishop Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Donald Lowery says: Comments (4) Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC November 8, 2015 at 11:01 pm The many issues that we engineer are killing the church. Please give church growth a chance. November 6, 2015 at 5:13 pm Dear Tom,Eastern Oregon is a geographically huge Diocese with only 22 parishes and I think only about 2600 parishioners. The convocation within which I live in NC has more members. I suspect, sadly, that the problem was not lack of women but lack of candidates male or female willing to serve a rural Diocese of isolated parishes. Sad, but we Episcopalians have lost our evangelistic zeal. I think God might have a plan to change that, however. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Derrick Wedderburn says: Tom eshelman says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Bishop Elections Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service November 5, 2015 at 5:48 pm Looks another Diocese with an all male slate. What is wrong with this picture folks and please don’t tell me there are no qualified women who want to be a Bishop. This has to change if we want to see our church change. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed. [Episcopal News Service] The Standing Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Oregon has announced a slate of three nominees to stand for the election as bishop of the diocese. The candidates are:The Rev. Patrick W. Bell, rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho;The Rev. Jedediah Holdorph, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Bend, Oregon; andThe Very Rev. Churchill Pinder, dean of St. Stephen’s Cathedral and School in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.The petition process officially closed on Nov. 3 and produced no new candidates.The nominees will participate in a series of open “walkabout” meetings from Nov. 30-Dec. 5, allowing members of the diocese to meet and learn more about the candidates.The election will take place on Dec. 12.Further information about the candidates is available here. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags November 8, 2015 at 11:16 pm Just to corroborate with your observation about the Episcopalian population in Oregon. The State of Oregon is known to have a very high percentage of “nones”, when it comes to religion. There is therefore a need for more priests in the areato enhance church growth.. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By ENS staffPosted Nov 5, 2015 Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Derrick Wedderburn says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Africa, Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop of Cape Town speaks out about water ‘inequality’ Posted Feb 7, 2017 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Anglican Communion, Press Release Service [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba has said the problem of water supply and sanitation illustrates why South Africa “is one of the most unequal countries in the world.” The archbishop also described the problem of drought as one of the biggest risks facing South Africa’s businesses – causing food shortages, price increases and the loss of jobs for casual workers.Full article. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Environment & Climate Change Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY last_img read more