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first_img29 October 2008Musical genius and beacon of South African pride Abdullah Ibrahim will again perform for his loyal local fans. With a history of world-class concert appearances and a worldwide fan base, Ibrahim is returning home to inspire.The pianist and composer will perform his new solo piano piece, entitled “Senzo”, meaning “ancestor” in both Chinese and Japanese, at the Artscape in Cape Town on 1 November, at Durban’s Jazz Centre on 5 and 6 November, and at the Wits Great Hall in Johannesburg on 7 November.“‘Senzo’ is a journey through sound – striving towards our individual and collective home,” says Ibrahim.Longtime followers of Ibrahim will find themselves amply rewarded with his live show. Built around the Abdullah Ibrahim Trio that has been breathing life into the performer’s repetoire for the past 12 years, the show features Ibrahim on piano and New Yorkers Belden Bullock and George Gray on bass and drums respectively.The shows will give Ibrahim’s fans a chance to see him perform the solo piano concerts that have drawn rapt responses when performed in the most important venues worldwide, including Carnegie Hall in New York, the Queen Elizabeth Hall and Barbican in London and the Berlin Philharmonic Hall.Other unique solo piano concert venues have included the Kamigamo Shrine in Kyoto, Japan – a first ever performance at the historic monastery and a tribute to the importance of Zen philosophy and the martial arts in Ibrahim’s life. The latter has seen Ibrahim earn a “Menkyo Kaiden” (an 8th degree black belt and a licence to teach) through his 40 years study with Great Grand Master Soke Tonegawa Sensei in Japan.An African musical geniusBorn in Cape Town in 1934, Ibrahim has been described as a South African icon, an African genius and an internationally revered piano player by critics.As a child, Ibrahim remembers listening to traditional African songs, religious music and jazz – all of which are reflected in his music. He received his first piano lessons in 1941 and became a professional musician in 1949 playing for the Tuxedo Slickers and, later, the Willie Max Big Band.In 1959 he met alto saxophonist Kippi Moeketsi, who convinced him to devote his life to music. His international music career blossomed in 1962 when the Dollar Brand Trio (with Johnny Gertze on bass and Makaya Ntshoko on percussion) toured Europe.What followed was a marathon tour of Europe, the United States and Japan with appearances at major music festivals of the world in Montreux, North Sea, Berlin, Paris and Montreal.MannenbergIn the mid-1970s, Ibrahim came back to South Africa. In June 1974, Abdullah Ibrahim, with Robbie Jansen, Basil Coetzee, Monty Weber, Morris Goldberg and Paul Michaels, recorded what was to become a beloved anthem in South Africa – Mannenberg.The album was recorded against a backdrop of forced removals as the apartheid government finalised its destruction of District Six in Cape Town, evicting coloured families from homes throughout the city. The title-track, “Mannenberg”, fused Cape jazz with African marabi to produce a melody that became a beloved anthem of hope and resistance for many South Africans.In 1976, Ibrahim returned to the United States because of the unfavourable political atmosphere in South Africa during that time.Returning to South Africa in 1990, Ibrahim embarked on numerous music projects, including a symphonic piece at the renowned Herkules Saal in Munich, Germany, and a premiere of “Cape Town Traveller”, a multi-media production at the Leipzig music festival in 1999.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

first_img2014 Mandela Washington Fellows during the Summit with President Obama. (Image: Young African Leaders Initiative)Two Play Your Part ambassadors have been chosen to participate in President Barack Obama’s Mandela Washington Fellowship Programme for Young African Leaders.Bongekile Radebe and Sandiso Sibisi are both social entrepreneurs devoted to improving the lives of others.Radebe is a 23-year-old woman from Mohlakeng, in Randfontein. She’s a passionate, value-driven and dynamic young leader who works in youth development and social entrepreneurship.Sibisi has been leading and participating in community development for six years. Her most relevant contribution has been towards the development of previously disadvantaged young women.THE FELLOWSHIPThe Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders began in 2014 and is the flagship programme of the American president’s Young African Leaders Initiative (Yali), which empowers young people through academic coursework, leadership training, and networking.In 2016, the fellowship will give 1 000 outstanding young leaders from sub-Saharan Africa the opportunity to hone their skills at an American higher education institution. They will also receive support for their professional development once they return home.The fellows, who are between the ages of 25 and 35, have established records of accomplishment in promoting innovation and positive change in their organisations, institutions, communities, and countries.In 2015, fellows represented all 49 countries in sub-Saharan Africa; 50% were women. It was the first time 76% of the fellows spent a substantial period of time in the United States.HER DESTINYBongekile Radebe is passionate about women empowerment. Radebe has been recognised as a future promising leader by Destiny magazine. Her passion for female leadership led her to found Her Destiny, a social enterprise that has partnered with Toni Glass, the tea company. Her Destiny influences empowering conversations between young women in connecting generations, improving personal development and understanding financial literacy.Her Destiny helps young women to participate in the economic acceleration of South Africa, to talk about issues that affect women the most and to work together to overcome challenges.Through Her Destiny, for every Toni Glass bottle of iced tea sold, R1 is contributed to their Young Women’s Education Fund. The fund helps to ease the living experience of young women at university.Radebe is a patriotic young South African who plays her part by promoting the culture of nation building.BORN TO SUCCEEDSandiso Sibisi is helping skill women in the business sphere.Sibisi has been leading and participating in community development for six years. Her most relevant contribution has been in the development of previously disadvantaged young women.Her programme, Born to Succeed, primarily focuses on business skills training, professional development, job placement and mentoring of unemployed young women in Gauteng.She founded the organisation, as well as took charge of all fundraising activities, and designed, organised and marketed the programme. Today it is staffed by an administrator, communications officer, project manager and marketer. It attracts previously disadvantaged young women from all over the country and appeals to Johannesburg investors.Sibisi also serves on the bursary committee of the Association for the Advancement of Black Accountants of Southern Africa. The committee focuses on helping previously disadvantaged, bright students from rural communities get university funding.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Xinjie Tong and Lingying ZhaoThe Ohio egg production industry is a significant economic sector in the state and is responsible for creation of 12,503 jobs and $438 million in annual earnings. Technology advances in egg production facilities over the past decades have enabled very efficient operations of large-scale layer houses, that can typically host 100,000 to 250,000 hens with stacked cages, automated manure-belts, feed and water delivery, egg transport, and mechanical ventilation systems. In these larger layer houses, ventilation plays a crucial role in maintaining a proper indoor air conditions and for disease control for hen health and efficient egg production. However, it has been a challenge to achieve the comfort and health standards with existing ventilation systems. At The Ohio State University, an innovative ventilation system has been designed at the air quality and bioenvironmental lab, which can potentially improve indoor environment and limit disease outbreaks in layer houses. Ventilation systemsThe most commonly used ventilation systems in layer houses are tunnel ventilation and cross ventilation. With a cross ventilation system, air enters a layer house through air inlets under the eaves or on the ceiling and exits through exhaust fans on side walls. It creates relatively uniform airflow inside the house, but is not able to effectively remove heat produced by hens in the summer. To abate heat stress, tunnel ventilation system has been widely adopted in layer houses, with which fresh air enters a layer house from one end of the house and is exhausted by fans located on the other end of the house. The tunnel ventilation provides a wind chill effect with high-speed air flow across animals and thus can make them feel cool in hot weather conditions and effectively alleviate heat stress in summer. As air travels from the inlets to the exhausts of a layer house with the tunnel ventilation system, it absorbs heat and moisture generated from hens. One big drawback of tunnel ventilation systems is that it results in large gradients of air temperature and relative humidity, air pollutant concentrations along the airflow pathways, and will make the air cool and dry near the air inlets but hot and moist near the air outlets. This non-uniform thermal condition is not desirable because it not only puts hens near outlets at higher risks, but also results in differentiation in hen performance, such as various sized eggs. It is therefore imperative to fully understand the thermal environment of large-scale commercial layer houses and develop an innovative ventilation system in order to manage heat stress problems accordingly and effectively. Heat stress problems in layer housesHeat stress is a common problem in layer houses because hens stocked in high density form intensive heat sources and the state-of-the-art ventilation system, tunnel ventilation, still cannot uniformly remove heat. Poultry are homoeothermic with a core body temperature maintained at 41.2 degrees C to 42.2 degrees C by thermoregulatory mechanisms in a comfortable environment. As the indoor temperature rises above the poultry comfort zone during hot summer months, hens start experiencing heat stress, where they usually spend less time feeding and moving, and more time drinking, resting, and panting. Egg production is also impaired under heat stress (i.e., annual losses of $61 to 98 million nationwide) through decreased egg production rate, reduced egg quality, and increased hen mortality. Heat stress problems will be further worsened due to increasing events of extreme temperature and heavier precipitation. Disease outbreaks and virus transmission in layer houses. Disease outbreaks are another big threat to the poultry industry. In 2015, the highly pathogenic H5 avian flu infected about 57 million birds in the U.S., resulting in a disastrous loss to the layer and turkey industries. Because the flu spread quickly, researchers suspect that the viruses were possibly airborne, meaning that their transmissions can be possibly driven by airflow.With the current ventilation systems, air mixing causes concerns about possible disease transmission. Once a hen has the virus, the ventilation airflow will transport the air polluted by that hen, and pass through many other hens located in different areas of the house before being removed via exhaust fans. In other words, the mixing ventilation possibly facilitates the transmission of viruses among hens and fastens the spread of the disease. Development of a new ventilationTo reduce economic losses due to heat stress and disease outbreaks, we are developing an upward airflow displacement ventilation (UADV) system for commercial manure-belt layer houses. In this new system, fresh air is uniformly supplied from air ducts located beneath the cages; it directly reaches hens and is heated by hens; the heated air will then escape the cages and flow upward in the aisles due to the buoyancy effect and suction caused by exhaust fans installed on the roof; air is finally exhausted out of the house through these exhaust fans. With this new ventilation system, an upward airflow can be formed inside the house and the polluted air traveling upward in aisles will be directly removed by exhaust fans on the roof without passing through other cages. This ventilation design allows for the shortest pathways of contaminated air and provides efficient removal of heat, moisture, air pollutants, and viruses compared to existing tunnel and cross ventilation systems. Performance of the new ventilation systemThe performance of the new UADV system was preliminarily simulated using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed by an Ohio State University research group. Using CFD models, indoor thermal conditions and disease transmission were simulated under different weather conditions with both the new UADV system and the existing tunnel ventilation system. It was found that the new UADV system provided more uniform thermal conditions with less heat stress compared to the existing tunnel ventilation. By using the new UADV system, heat stress at a danger level could be reduced from 8.7% to 0.7% in summer and cold stress could be reduced from 18.3% to 5.8% in winter. The new system also reduces the disease transmission from 29.8% to 2.7% in summer and from 61.4% to 44.3% in winter in the presumed scenario. Development statusResearchers, Dr. Lingying Zhao, an extension engineer and professor, Xinjie Tong, a Ph.D. student, and Dr. Sewoon Hong, a postdoctoral research associate at The Air Quality and Bio-Environmental Engineering Lab (AQBEL) of The Ohio State University, have submitted a provisional patent application for this new ventilation design. Further efforts are needed to test the UADV system in commercial laying hen farms. Any feedback and inputs from poultry farmers about the new ventilation systems will be very much appreciated.In summary, maintaining a comfortable and safe indoor environment of layer houses is a necessity, but a challenging task that cannot be fulfilled by the existing ventilation systems. The heat stress and disease outbreaks have caused significant economic losses. Ohio State researchers have developed an innovative upward airflow displacement ventilation (UADV) system for abating heat stress and limiting disease transmission among the hens. It can effectively improve uniform thermal conditions in layer house for abatement of both heat and cold stress. It also has the potential to limit pathogen transmission in layer houses. Further research is needed to test the UADV system in commercial laying hen farms. Xinjie Tong, Graduate Research Associate, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Lingying Zhao, Professor and Extension Ag. Engineer, can be reached at [email protected] This column is provided by the OSU Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, OSU Extension, Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center, and the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

first_img* Because of the limitations in PHPP discovered in the field, PHIUS partnered in 2011 with Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics and Owens Corning to collaborate on a new passive design tool that would appropriately predict energy performance for passive buildings in all climates. We now use WUFI Passive, capable of static (similar to PHPP) as well as a more detailed dynamic simulation to assess whole building energy performance, comfort conditions, hygrothermal performances of envelope assemblies, and hygric interaction of the enclosure and the living space. But between consulting on some projects and certifying and reviewing many others, we learned that the concept of a single Holy Grail standard for North America’s varied climates is just too good to be true.In practice, designers have arguably been forced into non-optimal decisions and designs in pursuit of the European 15 kWh/m²•year metric. For example, in the colder climates they tended to seriously overinsulate — with diminishing returns in the outer layers — and tended to overglaze (with expensive high-performance windows, no less). The projects relied heavily on solar gain to make the energy balance work.With some exceptions (e.g., the Pacific Northwest), the North American continent has design temperatures that are much more challenging than central Europe. It gets significantly colder during the winter, even while the number of heating degree days (HDDs) on an annual basis can look very similar to those in Europe. Madison, Wisconsin, is a perfect example: It has a colder design temperature than Oslo, Norway, while its HDDs are almost 2,000 lower than Oslo’s. PHPP problems in hot, humid climatesThese issues also manifested in the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP). Because PHPP is a massive Excel spreadsheet, users can “look under the hood,” which makes it a nice teaching and learning tool. But while well validated for heating-dominated climates, the tool proved inaccurate when we consulted on the LeBois House in Lafayette, Louisiana.The project was intended to be a proof-of-concept project in the Lafayette climate, and to demonstrate that designers could confidently use PHPP in hot and humid climates. The project plan included monitoring for two years after it was inhabited. During that period it became clear that in PHPP, cooling demand and sensible peak algorithms were off by a large margin. Moreover, we learned that latent loads really need to be accounted for in the standard (they were not at the time).The project was performing significantly better on the sensible cooling demand side than PHPP had predicted, by about 30%*, but worse on the peak — a situation that makes system sizing difficult. On the other hand, RESNET’s energy modeling tool REMRate predicted the actual performance almost spot on.Overall, the project was a huge success. We proved that hot climate passive principles do apply, resulting in superior comfort and significant energy savings. An overreliance on solar gainAlthough design temperatures are colder, there is generally very good solar potential in North America. Therefore designers in the U.S. and Canada tried to compensate by becoming essentially “solar Passivhauses” to get closer to the target, which in return caused overheating and comfort issues. (The passive solar movement learned those lessons in the 1970s. Ironically, those lessons were the ones that led to the development of the original passive house concept that deemphasized solar and reemphasized insulation.)Let’s face it: the annual heating demand of 15 kWh/m²•year was a result of meeting 10 W/m2 peak load in a specific climate, the European climate, with less extreme design temperatures — which as a bonus also allowed “supply air heating only” — the flagship core definition of a Passivhaus as established by the Passivhaus Institut (PHI).The specific relationship of annual demand and peak load in the European climate has led to the characteristic definition of the standard. Yet, the relationship of annual heating demand and peak load is not a strong one, and is very different on the North American continent. This is likely the reason why the pioneers in the 1970s and 1980s had identified generally similar peak loads as energy targets but paid little attention to limit their peaks to “supply air only,” because they could not get there, and comfort was still assured with slightly higher peak loads and greater annual demands. By August of 2011, eight years had passed since we completed the Smith House, the first home in the United States to be built to the European Passivhaus standard. Those eight years were heady and full: We founded the national non-profit Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS). We created a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) training curriculum and delivered trainings to hundreds of professionals from coast to coast.Those pioneering professionals began building their own projects from coast to coast, and from north to south, in all U.S. climate zones save for Florida. Because PHIUS had a good deal of practical experience building its own projects, because it provided training and certification (at the time under the auspices of the German Passivhaus Institut), PHIUS was quite naturally closely involved with nearly all of these projects.And that’s when we — PHIUS and CPHCs and builders across the United States — began collectively to learn the limitations of the European Passivhaus metric in varied climate zones outside of Central Europe. Some buildings were overinsulated and overglazedTo be sure, the concept of a single, relatively easily understood, internationally applicable energy metric for heating and cooling was (and is) enormously attractive. And in Central Europe the metrics have been well verified and tested. RELATED ARTICLES Redefining PassivhausAn Inside Look at the New PHIUS StandardNew Passive House Rules Take EffectA New Passivhaus Standard for North AmericaPossible Relaxation of Passivhaus Standard Stirs Debate A Petition Strives to Defend a Certain Definition of ‘Passive House’ A Proposed Passivhaus Amendment for New EnglandPHIUS PHloggingBuilding Science Corp. and PHIUS to CollaborateA Passivhaus Conference in GermanyA Post-Passivhaus Paradigm for Energy-Efficient Design Joseph Lstiburek Surprises Passive House Conference Attendees Developing new passive house standards for North AmericaIn 2011, the PHIUS Technical Committee, a volunteer body based on modified consensus and comprised of international building science experts and North American passive house practitioners, embarked on the plan to identify a methodology to generate new passive standards for all climate zones. The tech committee has identified four foundational principles that the standard should follow:1. Being biased towards conservation by constraining the envelope design through definition of annual heating and cooling demands and peak loads per climate that must be met using passive measures first. The climate-specific annual demand thresholds should pay back the investment and peak load thresholds should assure comfort.2. Meeting a total primary energy maximum per person for all energy uses in a building. This is essentially the equivalent to a carbon limit, responding very directly to the amount of carbon savings that need to be achieved in the building sector to stabilize the climate.3. An airtightness requirement assuring building envelope durability, verified by climate and measured in air leakage per square foot of envelope area.4. Cost-effectiveness using national average costs for materials and energy.The sweet spot or characteristic energy use intensity (EUI) is then defined as the optimum design between demand and supply, or more specifically, between conservation and generation. In California, PV beats passive houseBut this project was another example of an overarching conclusion: the original German standard and tool were inadequate when applied in climates other than the cool, moderate, heating-dominated baseline climate. Results did not support the one-size-fits-all standard concept.In cold climates, unreasonably high investment costs led people to abandon the concept, and uptake in northern cold climates remains to this day insignificant. In warmer climates like coastal California, a European passive house is easily beaten by a house with a photovoltaic system, because the standard does not go far enough and does not harvest enough through conservation to make it a financial slam dunk.Standards are tools that help us to quantify, measure against and meet certain goals we have agreed upon. It’s only logical that they need to be updated and refined as economics, materials and other conditions change and as we learn more. It is an evolutionary process.Standards should evolve, informed by feedback loops, or they become a hindrance, not a help. We can’t blindly trust: we need to verify and validate to assure that our models remain applicable. Lower PV prices have changed the conversationIn a sustainable world we must look at zero energy as our goal. We are no longer only trying to justify the cost-effectiveness of a certain level of stand-alone conservation, we are trying to justify the optimal combination of both, conservation and generation, to reach zero energy.The energy supply would be expected to come from renewable sources; for buildings this would most likely come from photovoltaic (PV) systems. The cost for these systems has come down dramatically over the past few years. This changes the conversation significantly. Figuring that zero is our goal, the cost of PV has a significant impact on where the optimum lies. Now zero has indeed realistically become our new target; positive energy is next. That alone is reason to redo the calculations and refine the standards.In 2013 we pitched the idea of refining the standard depending on climate and cost to Building Science Corporation in Westford, Massachusetts. They liked the idea and submitted a research proposal with PHIUS as an industry partner under their DOE Building America contract to define passive standards by climate zone according to U.S. cost data. The calculations are being done using the energy modeling tool WUFI Passive (developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Owens Corning, and PHIUS) and the energy and cost optimizer BEopt (developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Solutions that weren’t cost-effectiveOverinsulation and overglazing both resulted in overspending beyond cost effectiveness, seriously challenging the claim that 15 kWh/m²•year is somewhat magically the cost optimum/sweet spot between demand and supply everywhere in the world. (See many earlier articles by Martin Holladay questioning the 16-inch-thick subslab insulation of early Passivhaus projects and the discussions that followed.)Conversely, in warmer and milder climates (a prime example being California), the target of 15 kWh/m²•year is actually too high, allowing projects to leave significant cost-effective energy savings on the table. In extreme hot and humid climates like Florida, we learned that energy targets for cooling were simply unattainable.It appeared that the European standard had simply mirrored the heating demand of 15 kWh/m²•year for cooling without verifying it in hot climates. In practice, insulation does not yield the dramatic return in energy savings in cooling-dominated climates as it does in heating climates; in fact too much insulation can increase the cooling load. European internal load assumptions don’t work for North AmericaIn reviewing base assumptions for the model, the tech committee also decided that the internal loads currently assumed in the European model are far from realistic. While the committee agreed that the defaults for internal loads should be stringent compared to the current national average use of miscellaneous electrical loads, they also acknowledged that the current European defaults are only one-seventh of the actual current internal load average in the United States. This leads to a significant mismatch of what is assumed and what happens in reality.Corrected higher initial internal loads in turn impact heating and cooling demand criteria on an annual basis, and have an impact on where those demand criteria need to be defined when setting standards.As of this writing, the standard adaptation test plan is almost complete and the parameters and the methodology for the study have been decided. As the project progresses, the dynamic modeling side of WUFI Passive will be used to verify hygrothermal wall assembly performance by climate and to assure that the comfort criteria by zone are maintained when annual heating or cooling demands are slightly increased or reduced.Preliminary results are looking very promising. PHIUS is already accepting projects under a pilot certification program.As the work has moved forward, questions have arisen as to how granular these new standards should be. The final format is still an open question. Originally, a zone-based standard model was envisioned, but it is also possible that the study will result in the development of an equation that accurately calculates the respective heating, cooling demand and peak loads by location.The new climate specific standards findings are scheduled to be presented for the first time during the Ninth Annual North American Passive House Conference in San Francisco, September 12-13, 2014. A one-hundred-year payback period is unrealisticThe effort is running calculations for all climates for a typical single-family home, with carefully chosen and defined design constraints and energy baseline features, first in BEopt. All baseline decisions were carefully conceived and evaluated by the PHIUS tech committee. In the process, it became clear that the European case for cost effectiveness of the 15 kWh/m²•year standard is based on a 100-year lifecycle period for a single-family end townhouse.The tech committee found this to be an unrealistic value for a North American economic feasibility assessment of conservation measures. One hundred years might be accurate in an ultimately sustainable energy economy, but we are not there yet. The measures need to be cost-effective in the old economy as we are transitioning to the new. Consequently, the tech committee opted to use 30 years instead of 100.The committee also settled on using a detached, average size single-family home — the predominant housing type in North America. The detached home is also arguably a worst-case scenario to use as a benchmark; any other building type, larger or attached, will perform better. Katrin Klingenberg is the co-founder and executive director of the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS). She has spoken and published on passive building topics nationally and internationally, holds a masters degree in architecture, and is a licensed architect in Germany.last_img read more

first_imgPH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Eya Laure doesn’t want to think much about becoming the future leader of University of Santo Tomas.But the way she’s playing belies that.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte UST coach Kungfu Reyes lauded his players’ efforts which he said was best in recent years.“Our development was very good, I hope we sustain it,” said Reyes. “Our only minus factor is we lost one player to injury (Alessandrini).”He said he won’t gamble using Alessandrini until the 6-foot-2 hitter is 100 percent ready physically and psychologically.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving Playing with a lot of heart, the rookie open hitter scored 15 points to power UST to a 25-18, 25-14, 25-20 rout of University of the East Sunday in the UAAP women’s volleyball at FilOil Flying V Centre.It was the third straight win for the Tigresses in a 5-2 card, good for a tie for second with the La Salle Lady Spikers at the end of their first round schedule.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“For me it’s about teamwork, playing with heart and communication,” said Laure in Filipino. She teamed up with UST resident gunner Sisi Rondina in burying the Lady Warriors to their fourth straight defeat for 1-6.Later in the day, University of the Philippines recovered from an opening set loss to turn back Adamson, 25-27, 25-14, 25-12, 25-21. Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon eventcenter_img MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Breakthrough for Fuel Masters Google Philippines names new country director Ayel Estranero, UP’s soft-spoken setter, said their fourth win in seven games was a “morale-booster” after the Lady Maroons suffered stinging defeats at the hands of UST and rookie-laden National University.Adamson fell into a tie with UE in bringing up the rear of the eight-team field going into the second round next week.Rondina finished with 17 points, while Dimdim Pacres and KC Galdones contributed eight points each for UST, which has been playing without the injured Milena Alessandrini.“All of this is for Milena, she gives us motivation that every one must step up every game and do what we do in practice,” added Laure.Judith Abil scored 15 points for the Lady Warriors, including seven in the third set when she single-handedly tried to carry the fight for UE.ADVERTISEMENT Miguel Romero Polo: Bamboo technology like no other Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting LATEST STORIESlast_img read more