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first_img Move-in day On top of things The Harvard Class of 2014 struts their stuff in these custom hats, made especially for them. Shaking hands Catherine Gu ’14 arrives at Thayer Hall for the first time and meets Dean of Harvard College Evelynn Hammonds. Her parents, Kenan (from left) and Yancui, and her sister, Amanda, look on in excitement. All for one … And 1-4 all. Who doesn’t love a clever balloon message? Stephanie Mitchell, Kris Snibbe, Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographers Got any Grey Poupon? Erin Washington ’11 of the Crimson Key Society offers window-side directions to the flood of families. Fresh-faced Moving is always stressful, and a smile is always welcome. Here, Stoughton North proctor Devon Wessman-Smerdon meets and greets incoming students. Is Matt Damon on there? First-year roommates Chelsea Celistan (left) and Danielle Lussi pore over a list of their room’s former tenants. Hardwood floors, exposed brick… Not a South End condo description, but a Stoughton dorm! Chelsea Celistan (center) and roommate Danielle Lussi (left) have lots of decorating to do. Drifters, vagabonds California girl Namrata Anand (left) sits with her cousin Kausalya and a boatload of luggage outside of her new home, Matthews Hall. Justin Ide/ Harvard Staff Photographer Empty nests Dean of Harvard College Evelynn Hammonds talks with and charms the proud parents. Mobile home Terrance Moore ’14 (right) moves from Atlanta into Straus Hall with a little help from his father, Melvin, and this cart. Photo ops Who wouldn’t strike a pose? Outside of Johnston Gate, Kyle Kruger (left) of Sugarland, Texas, charms the photographer (her mom). Harvard University began welcoming new students and their families Thursday (Aug. 26), with the first move-in day signifying the beginning of the fall semester and a new academic year.The newcomers were helped in acclimating to their environment by peer advisers — upperclassmen who volunteer to provide academic and social mentoring.  This group can easily be spotted around Harvard Yard wearing bright orange T-shirts that read “Finding Freshman.”Anika Petach ’13 is a peer adviser for Matthews Hall. She describes her role as “being there as a steppingstone for freshmen, with any questions they have so that they can get the resources that they need. It’s a friendly way for them to get information.”  Peer advisers also offer a student perspective about classes and other aspects of life on campus.The Gu family was greeted by Harvard College Dean Evelynn Hammonds after they finished moving their daughter Catherine into Thayer Hall from New Jersey. Yancui Gu was impressed with how organized the move-in was and how helpful people were in assisting. “The room is nice, and there is a big common room,” said Catherine. Her biggest concern was the bathroom, because, as she said, “I really don’t know how this is going to work with a hall full of girls and only two showers.”Terrance Moore and his father Melvin traveled from Atlanta to move in Terrance. Terrance said of the traffic-clogged streets that, “we were not ready for that” but his dad said, “We are from Atlanta, I promise you this traffic is nothing. We had no problems and I have no complaints. Everything was done just right.” They said this is an exciting time for each of them. Terrance is looking forward to “meeting all the extraordinary people at Harvard” and the football season.”  Melvin said of his son, “I hope that he makes us all proud with whatever he does. I’m proud of him getting here.”Jimmy McCune and his mother Sharon had an easy commute, coming from nearby Somerville. The most challenging part of the move for them was the 20-minute time limit to get everything from the car upstairs to Jimmy’s room. Jimmy said he approached move-in day with an “expect the unexpected” attitude, and it had gone better than expected. Of presidential priority Harvard President Drew Faust picks up some energy-efficient fluorescent bulbs from Chandan Lodha ’13 (from left), Annie Baldwin ’13, Annie DeAngelo ’12, and Kurt Tsuo ’11 of the Resource Efficiency Program.last_img read more

first_imgBy Kay Valle April 15, 2020 About 4,000 elements of the Honduran Armed Forces deliver food to the most vulnerable populations in the country, who are on lockdown as part of the government’s measures to curb the coronavirus spread.Food distribution efforts, which began on March 25 in Tegucigalpa, will continue in other departments to deliver about 800,000 bags of supplies during the first stage. Authorities expect to reach more than 3 million people in poor areas and in the cities with the most coronavirus cases.Honduran service members climb a steep hill in a Tegucigalpa neighborhood to deliver food to families in need, who are in quarantine due to the coronavirus spread. (Photo: Honduran Armed Forces’ Public Affairs)“We are doing everything in our power to save lives,” said Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández in a televised speech. “This includes ensuring that the most vulnerable people have food on their table, so they can be safe, even under the pressure of being quarantined.”The bags of supplies include, among other foods, rice, sugar, ground coffee, beans, flour, margarine, pasta, and instant chicken soup. They also include a hygiene kit with masks, antiseptic gel with alcohol, soap, toilet paper, and information about the coronavirus.The Logistics Directorate of the Armed Forces’ Joint Chiefs of Staff has been carrying out the food delivery plan day and night, executed by elements of the Humanitarian Rescue Unit (UHR, in Spanish), who are highly qualified to confront all kinds of challenges, such as traveling in hard-to-reach areas.“Some areas can only be reached on foot; our soldiers climb hills carrying the bags,” Air Force Colonel Yuri Chávez, director of the Armed Forces Public Affairs, told Diálogo.According to Private Luis Miguel Rivas, assigned to the Honduran Army’s UHR that has been distributing food in Tegucigalpa, the blessings that service members receive when delivering supplies are worth the steep hill climbs. “They remain in our hearts and give us the energy to continue delivering food,” Pvt. Rivas told Diálogo.While Pvt. Rivas, like his military comrades, has left his children and his family behind, he expressed pride in serving the Honduran population and providing support to people in need at a time of crisis. “I remember a special case, in the Los Pinos colony, Tegucigalpa; an elderly woman had eight people under her care. It made me really sad knowing how much need people have,” the soldier said.According to World Bank data, 60 percent of the 9.2 million Hondurans live in poverty, and in rural areas about one in five Hondurans lives in conditions of extreme poverty.In addition to food distribution, the Armed Forces have mobilized drinking water tanks to supply Tegucigalpa’s residents, who are undergoing a severe water shortage due to the drought that affected the country in late 2019. Since early April, the Armed Forces have also been manufacturing around 3,000 masks per day, while a team of engineers is working on prototype respirators to equip health centers.last_img read more