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first_imgWATCH: The Preview Show for Michigan A message from FOX Sports about America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1 WATCH: Up to Speed: Vickers, Dillon in spotlight WATCH: Fantasy Showdown: Previewing Michigan FOX Sports 1 offers you the level of access to NASCAR content you’ve been accustomed to with SPEED. To go along with nearly 5,000 hours of live event, news and original programming annually, FOX Sports 1 is the home of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, select NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races (2015), select NASCAR Nationwide Series races (2015), as well as Speedweeks events, including Daytona 500 Coors Light Pole Qualifying, the Sprint Unlimited at Daytona International Speedway and the Budweiser Duels.Popular established NASCAR-specific programs, including NASCAR RaceDay, NASCAR Victory Lane and NASCAR Race Hub continue on FOX Sports 1, as does live coverage of practice and qualifying sessions from all three national series. On launch day, FOX Sports 1 brings you more than six hours of NASCAR programming, highlighted by coverage of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race from Michigan International Speedway – the first live event on America’s new sports network:Saturday 8/17 highlightsNASCAR Live – 8 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 8:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Keystone Light Pole Qualifying – 9:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 11 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Setup – Noon ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Racing – 12:30 p.m. ETFor a full schedule, details, and to find out which channel you can find FOX Sports 1 in your home, please visit www.FOXSports1.com.From your friends at FOX SportsMORE:center_img To our valued NASCAR fans:America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1, has arrived. We are proud and excited to tell you the network will continue its extensive coverage of NASCAR for many years to come. WATCH: NASCAR Next: Ryan Gifford KEY FOX AND FOX SPORTS 1 SUMMARY: 2015-2024• NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: First 16 points races (9 on FOX Sports, 7 on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Nationwide Series: First 14 points races (14 races on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Camping World Truck Series: All races• NASCAR Sprint Unlimited, Budweiser Duels and NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race• ‘TV Everywhere’ live-streaming rights for NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series and NASCAR Camping World Truck Serieslast_img read more

first_imgYesterday, the non-partisan music-based voter registration group, Headcount, launched a brand-new initiative dubbed the Cannabis Voter Project. Founded with the recognition that “cannabis legalization is an issue that has the power to drive voter turnout in a big way,” the Cannabis Voter Project seeks to educate Americans about how voting can impact cannabis policy.The Cannabis Voter Project’s website, CannabisVoter.info, offers an easily digestible resource for voters that breaks down where elected officials in all 50 states stand on cannabis issues. Voters can find out where every governor, senator, and congressional representative stands on things like federal marijuana legalization, state-level marijuana legalization, allowing veterans to use medical marijuana, allowing banks to work with marijuana businesses, CBD legalization, and industrial hemp legalization.This Cannabis Voter Project’s newly-launched website has a number of other resources for cannabis-friendly voters, such as resources for calling and writing elected officials. Those voters can also make their position known by purchasing shirts that say “I Smoke Pot And I Vote” and “Vote Green”, and the site makes it easy to connect with cannabis policy reform groups like NORML, Students For Sensible Drug Policy, the Marijuana Policy Project, and the Drug Policy Alliance. Of course, since this is a Headcount initiative, the site makes it very easy for folks to register to vote.Yesterday, The Disco Biscuits bassist Marc Brownstein—who also happens to be co-founder and co-chair of HeadCount—announced the Cannabis Voter Project. You can read his full message below. For more information on the brand-new Headcount initiative, head to the Cannabis Voter Project’s website here. We’ve heard it all… My vote doesn’t count. or.. There’s no point in voting, both parties are the same… Nothing ever changes… or does it?Do you care about cannabis legalization?Let’s not forget that in all states where cannabis has been legalized, there was a vote by the people or elected legislature to make that happen.Voting has already legalized medical cannabis in 30 states and recreational use in nine states. Three more states are voting on legalization measures this November.With that in mind, check out HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project on our new website CannabisVoter.info.We created a singular resource for you to learn where your elected officials stand on seven major cannabis issues, from industrial hemp to outright legalization.CannabisVoter.info also has links to the best of cannabis media, advocacy organizations, and opportunities to take action. And of course, it’s a place where you can register to vote.Check it out. Click around the website. Share it on social media. Let us know what you think. You might be surprised by what you learn.Cannabis policy is incredibly unique. It is one of the only truly non-partisan issues in modern politics, with the power to engage people of all ages, races, and political affiliations. It’s an issue that shows how people’s votes can shape policy and directly change lives. This is why HeadCount launched the Cannabis Voter Project.And if you wear your colors, grab one of these t-shirts and be a proud cannabis voter.See you at a show,Marc BrownsteinCo-Founder and Co-Chair, HeadCountlast_img read more

first_imgStudent Senate debated the feasibility of streamlining student government by merging with the Council of Representatives (COR) at its meeting Wednesday. Oversight committee chair Ben Noe said the merger would make student government more effective by consolidating meetings and making the group more representative of the entire student body. “It would help cut down on the amount of necessary waste that goes into all the student government meetings,” Noe said. “It would also help those involved in COR who may not have a voice in the policy process. It would give them a voice and a vote.” Student body vice president Brett Rocheleau said the change would eliminate COR and add eight new voting members to Senate — the four class presidents, the off-campus president, the chair of the Student Union Board, the president of the Club Coordination Council and the Student Union treasurer. These extra voices would improve the dialogue at Student Senate meetings, student body president Pat McCormick said. “Wouldn’t it be cool to see if we could expand representativeness in the Senate to really get Senate to be more of a deliberative body, to include the class perspectives and other perspectives?” he said. McCormick said the committee chair updates, which typically occur during the first 20 minutes of Senate, would be eliminated from the meetings in order for the group to focus more on addressing student body issues. “There is going to be a little bit more clarity at meetings,” he said. “This will really be the time for us to discuss the issues of the day for the student body.” The fusion would also offer students, especially those living off campus, better representation in the policy branch of student government, McCormick said. “[Off-campus senator] Helen Costa represents 1500 students, while each other senator represents approximately 300,” McCormick said. “Even though we have the halls covered in Senate, we really don’t have off-campus students covered.” The additions of the off-campus president and the senior class president would ensure the needs of off-campus students receive greater attention. Keough senator Andrew Anderson questioned whether it would be fair to give voting powers to some of the suggested additional members, as a number of them are appointed rather than elected. While officers such as the Student Union treasurer are not elected, McCormick said they could still bring valuable viewpoints to Senate. “The idea would be that in having them here, they would be able to provide the perspectives of the other important branches of the Student Union,” he said. Rocheleau said that though representation is a concern, the merger is primarily aimed at improving effectiveness. “While representation is a question, it isn’t the main focus of the fusion,” he said. “The fusion is trying to be more effective and have better meetings than we currently have in the two separate meetings.” Walsh senator Elizabeth Owers, who also sits on COR, said the change would remove the great deal of overlap experienced by students who attend more than one meeting per week. “Anything that’s not discussed at COR, it’s discussed at Senate, then we get those updates at Hall Council too,” she said. “Plus if you’re sitting in three meetings a week, each one might not feel so important. But if you’re down to one, it makes it feel really important.”last_img read more

first_imgFemale adventurers fight for equalityHiking makes me feel beautiful, confident, self-reliant and free. So why do I feel the exact opposite as a female athlete and business professional in the outdoor industry?Anna Levesque, a professional paddler and owner of Girls at Play, has also noted the male culture of the outdoor scene. “The outdoor industry has traditionally been male dominated, and that lends itself to a culture in which acting and thinking like a man is the dominant paradigm.”Perhaps this male-dominated paradigm is most evident at Outdoor Retailer, a bi-annual national convention that brings together outdoor companies, media outlets, nonprofits, athletes, and enthusiasts.As an attendee I have memories of wading through the throng of beards, trucker hats, and flannel shirts while scanning the horizon and hoping to find another female athlete. I would love to come across a female buyer who isn’t solely responsible for selecting “cute” lifestyle apparel. And would it be impossible to find one booth where there is actually a female CEO as opposed to the endless number of hostesses who schedule meetings and hand out M&Ms?At the trade show several years ago, I recall rounding a turn to find a group of women—not athletes, buyers, or CEOs—but models clad in bikinis and crampons. As I stood behind a wall of ogling males, I watched the guy in front of me clink his craft brew against his neighbor’s bottle. “This is almost as good as the demonstration with those chicks in two-pieces doing yoga on stand up paddleboards.”I am not a prude or down on the modeling industry; I just would like to see equal standards. “I see women getting recognition because they pose half naked,” says Levesque. “It would be more egalitarian if men were expected to do the same.” Hear that, fellas? Anytime there are bikinis, we expect banana hammocks, too!But the gender discrepancy isn’t just at outdoor conventions. World class climber and instructor Lisa Rands recalls that, for many years, prize money at competitions was not equal for male and female winners. Now, thanks to women like Lisa, equal prize money is the climbing industry standard.But that doesn’t mean that women receive equal treatment. There are far more sponsorship opportunities for men. Anna Levesque says that once she contacted a paddling company about sponsorship, and they said they weren’t taking on anyone new. A week later, her husband got an email from them asking him to be on their team.Sometimes being married to someone in the industry makes the gender difference that much more stark. Anne Lundblad is a runner who competed at an international level while owning a running store in Asheville and raising a daughter. Her husband Mark is also an elite runner.She noted that after races, it’s not uncommon for blogs and magazine features to give the men’s results the headline while women’s results are an afterthought. The industry gender gap became more of a gender chasm once she had a child. “My husband and I were both running and competing, but I was the only one who had to answer work-life balance questions from the media. I’ve also observed moms getting criticized for the adventures they pursued while dads got praised for similar undertakings.”Personally, I’ll never forget the joy of being in the hospital clad in a bare-butt gown and nursing my newborn—when I learned that I’d been dropped by my biggest sponsor. “Really?!” I thought. “You’re telling a physically drained, sleep deprived, hormonally whacked-out woman that she’s been cut? Couldn’t this have waited a week?”Okay, after that rant, it’s important to highlight that none of the women I interviewed came off as indignant or resentful. Anna, Lisa, and Anne all made me see that navigating the outdoor industry is a lot like navigating a river, rock wall, or trail. If there’s an obstacle in your path, it’s up to you to find a way around it. These women haven’t let inequalities prevent them from starting companies or performing at the highest level; instead they’ve gained grace and wisdom by overcoming barriers.The future of the outdoor industry is not going to be found by marketing to the same group of lumbersexual men in mountain towns. It’s going to be found by expanding its reach to women, minorities, and individuals of all body shapes and sizes. Anna, Lisa, and Anne have already found success by doing that, more individuals are signing on, and eventually the industry will catch up with what these talented and intelligent women are doing.“The river is empowering in so many ways. It’s a metaphor for life: Look where you want to go, trust yourself. Do something that scares you, allow yourself to jump and the net will appear and, of course, go with the flow.”—Anna Levesque“Don’t let your frustrations get the best of you. Turn your frustrations into motivation.”—Lisa Rands“When you’re in the woods, you’re not comparing yourself to anyone. You’re not trying to be better, prettier, smarter. It’s just you and the wild and you are learning what makes you, you. And you learn to value your body for what it can do, for its potential, rather than its looks.”—Anne Lundblad “The trail is there for everyone at every phase of life.”—Jennifer Pharr Davislast_img read more

first_imgBy Taciana Moury/Diálogo October 30, 2018 The 10th International Air and Space Doctrine Seminar presented the Brazilian Air Force’s (FAB, in Portuguese) operational doctrine to air forces of Latin America, Canada, and Spain in the city of Madrid, Colombia. The Colombian Air Force (FAC, in Spanish) Noncommissioned Officers Academy organized the event held August 22-24, 2018. Representatives from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Spain attended the event. The objective was to share preparation and execution of aerospace power doctrine of participating countries. According to Colonel Federico Bocanegra Bernal, commandant of FAC Noncommissioned Officers Academy, the event brought together technical experts. The commandant pointed out the importance of grasping operational doctrines from partner nation air forces to establish understanding and cooperate among them. “The integration also contributes to interoperability among the forces, which helps combat transnational threats that affect the continent,” he told Diálogo. This was the first time that Brazil participated in the international seminar. According to FAB Colonel Luiz Guilherme da Silva Magarão, air attaché in Colombia, the strategic partnership both countries have in the region prompted the invitation. “FAB was invited to participate in many operational, doctrinal, and academic events, always with an outstanding role,” said Col. Magarão. “The knowledge exchange between partner nations is very positive and led to significant growth for bilateral activities between both countries.” During the seminar, participating nations presented their doctrinal differences and peculiarities, and how they adapt to laws specific to each country. Participants also addressed the necessary adjustments of air power to technological innovations, both in aerospace and cybernetics. “The use of remotely controlled unmanned aerial vehicles remains controversial in nearly all air forces,” said Col. Magarão. Service members also discussed the need to adapt air force doctrines to new cyberspace scenarios. Air power should encompass airspace and cyberspace power. FAB’s reorganization During the seminar, FAB presented its new operational readiness process, as well as the restructure of the force, which started in 2016. FAB also highlighted significant positive impacts while accomplishing the constitutional mission. FAB Colonel Pedro Henrique Cavalcanti de Almeida of the Preparation Command (COMPREP, in Portuguese) addressed the alignment of areas of preparation and allocation post-FAB reorganization. The former Air Operations General Command (COMGAR, in Portuguese) once managed both activities. The Aerospace Operations Command now oversees FAB’s assets allocation, whereas COMPREP defines assets preparation. Both commands were recently created. “COMPREP did not simply inherit COMGAR’s processes. The institutional restructuring and realignment optimized operational training and doctrinal development, which are the two end-goal activities of the Preparation Command,” said Col. Pedro at the event. “The Preparation Command redesigned their business model, making it more modern, agile, and solely focused on delivering aerial assets to secure the sovereignty of our air space and the integrity of the Brazilian territory.” “FAB’s restructuring is already a success story, and discussing this new process was very important to confirm that it is ground-breaking, cutting edge, and a permanent process of innovation for our force. The feedback received during the event could not have been better, proving that we are on the right track and setting a precedent,” Col. Pedro said. Interoperability Participating nations also addressed joint and combined doctrines and the importance of interoperability. During the seminar, FAB explained the operational model of COMPREP’s new exercise to prepare service members and assets for United Nations (UN) peacekeeping missions. Exercise Tápio, conducted in May 2018, simulated an irregular war scenario with humanitarian crises, using characteristics similar to UN missions around the world. The activity mobilized about 700 service members of the Brazilian Armed Forces. For Col. Pedro, being exposed to other air forces’ operations during the seminar helped improve the country’s doctrine. “It was very important for our processes to know what is done in Latin America, Canada, and Spain as it will serve as a reference in the many areas requiring quality improvement in the adopted doctrine,” he said. Brazil’s participation in the Colombian event was very beneficial, said Col. Magarão, especially for the current reorganization process and its effects to the development and update of the doctrinal process. The topic of reorganization sparked great interest from attending air forces, particularly FAC, who also promotes organizational reforms.last_img read more