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first_imgIn speaking at Harvard about “dOCUMENTA (13),” Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, the exhibit’s artistic director and the Edith Kreeger Wolf Distinguished Visiting Professor at Northwestern University, found great meaning in a piece of art “the size of an iPod.”The 2012 show was based in Germany with installations in Egypt, Afghanistan, and Canada that attracted scores of visitors. One installation featured several small Bactrian princess statues originating from the northern part of what is now Afghanistan and dating to 2000 B.C. Curators know of only 80 such statues in the world.Each princess is unique. The composite figurines are made up of separately carved stones. The individual sections, which together give each princess form, are not bound by glue or secured by any other mechanism. Balance is the crucial factor.History and equilibrium were also fundamental to the theme of the larger exhibit, Christov-Bakargiev said. Those concerns helped address the question of connectivity and separation, how to “make something that has a togetherness, and at the same time is a centrifugal structure outward.”Christov-Bakargiev spoke at Harvard on Wednesday as the inaugural lecturer of a new program by the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture and the Harvard Art Museums. The joint effort will focus on innovative curatorial practice, offering seminars and a public lecture annually.“One of the most important ideas behind the formation of the new partnership of the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture was to develop programming for both Harvard and public audiences that bridges the historic and contemporary intellectual domains of the separate museums and fosters dialogue among them,” said Jane Pickering, executive director of the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture.  “This new initiative is a wonderful beginning to such an effort and inviting a world-renowned curator like Carolyn, who thinks creatively across the disciplines, provides a fantastic opportunity for us to explore new avenues to achieve this goal.”“The Harvard Art Museums, as part of their teaching and research mission, seek to inspire thoughtful discourse and debate around the importance of art in society,” said Thomas W. Lentz, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums. “All Harvard’s museums aim to emphasize the role that original works of art, specimens, and artifacts play in an advanced education.”He continued: “We expect that these annual seminars will inspire students and young scholars from diverse fields of knowledge and will encourage new collaboration among all Harvard museums.”“Together the Harvard Museums hold millions of objects that represent the natural and cultural world, from anthropology to zoology,” said Peter L. Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor and Director of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments. “We want to use these collections to provoke the way we think about curating objects, to link collections to teaching and research at the university, and to bring to the broader public new ideas about how museums could bridge the sciences and the arts.”In addition to Christov-Bakargiev’s lecture, seminars were hosted across Harvard museums — Adolphus Busch Hall at the Harvard Art Museums, the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, and the Harvard Museum of Natural History — through Thursday. The seminars allowed students from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School of Education, and the Graduate School of Design to join invited faculty and members of the community in conversations about questions raised by Christov-Bakargiev as well as issues connected to curating objects across disciplinary divides.last_img read more

first_imgWhen it came to his music, Prince was one in a million (okay, a billion). But in one other – very important – aspect of his life, he was just, plain average. Like 55% of American adults, according to LexisNexis, Prince didn’t have a will. (The numbers for minorities – 68% of black adults, 73% of Hispanics – are even higher.) A PwC survey even found that 30% of people with wealth greater than $500,000 don’t have a will.Why are the numbers so high? There are so many reasons. We don’t like to think about the fact that we’re going to die, someday. We actually don’t think we’re going to die (ahh, optimism). We’ll do it tomorrow. Or next week. Or the next time we travel. And then we don’t.In one sense, I’ll give Prince a pass here. He may have set his relatives up for an unpleasant to-do as they scramble over his reported $300 million fortune. But at least he didn’t leave any children behind. A will is the only document that allows you to name guardians for minor children. Not having one once you have kids is unconscionable in my book. continue reading » 76SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

first_imgFort St. John Staff Sergeant Ward Johnson is encouraging the City to look at budgeting for more RCMP members.The current edition of the 2009 Operating Budget does not allow for any new RCMP members. The RCMP will still see new members join the force this year, but that is from the 2008 budget. In many cases it can take anywhere from 12 to 24 months before a requested recruit is available in any given community.A 2006 Human Resources Needs Analysis stated that the RCMP need approximately 40 regular members to provide sufficient service levels in the community. Currently the RCMP has 32 regular members and that number has increased only by 7 since 1981.- Advertisement -Staff Sergeant Ward Johnson says there is away for the detachment to get more regular members without increasing the Operational Budget. Currently the RCMP runs a vacancy rate where members are not paid for by the city while they are on maternity/paternity leave or injured. This free’s up money in the RCMP’s budget that is normally returned to the city at the end of the year.The problem with using that money is it doesn’t provide a permanent solution as once those members return to regular duty, that money is no longer available.Council will now look at the idea of adding more members, but that could change the Operational Budget. The idea will be discussed further at the next council meeting scheduled for Monday.Advertisementlast_img read more