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first_imgWATCH: The Preview Show for Michigan A message from FOX Sports about America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1 WATCH: Up to Speed: Vickers, Dillon in spotlight WATCH: Fantasy Showdown: Previewing Michigan FOX Sports 1 offers you the level of access to NASCAR content you’ve been accustomed to with SPEED. To go along with nearly 5,000 hours of live event, news and original programming annually, FOX Sports 1 is the home of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, select NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races (2015), select NASCAR Nationwide Series races (2015), as well as Speedweeks events, including Daytona 500 Coors Light Pole Qualifying, the Sprint Unlimited at Daytona International Speedway and the Budweiser Duels.Popular established NASCAR-specific programs, including NASCAR RaceDay, NASCAR Victory Lane and NASCAR Race Hub continue on FOX Sports 1, as does live coverage of practice and qualifying sessions from all three national series. On launch day, FOX Sports 1 brings you more than six hours of NASCAR programming, highlighted by coverage of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race from Michigan International Speedway – the first live event on America’s new sports network:Saturday 8/17 highlightsNASCAR Live – 8 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 8:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Keystone Light Pole Qualifying – 9:30 a.m. ETNASCAR Sprint Cup Series practice – 11 a.m. ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Setup – Noon ETNASCAR Camping World Truck Series Racing – 12:30 p.m. ETFor a full schedule, details, and to find out which channel you can find FOX Sports 1 in your home, please visit www.FOXSports1.com.From your friends at FOX SportsMORE:center_img To our valued NASCAR fans:America’s new 24-hour sports network, FOX Sports 1, has arrived. We are proud and excited to tell you the network will continue its extensive coverage of NASCAR for many years to come. WATCH: NASCAR Next: Ryan Gifford KEY FOX AND FOX SPORTS 1 SUMMARY: 2015-2024• NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: First 16 points races (9 on FOX Sports, 7 on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Nationwide Series: First 14 points races (14 races on FOX Sports 1)• NASCAR Camping World Truck Series: All races• NASCAR Sprint Unlimited, Budweiser Duels and NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race• ‘TV Everywhere’ live-streaming rights for NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series and NASCAR Camping World Truck Serieslast_img read more

first_imgWhen Tom Wolfe passed away on Monday, the literary world lost one of its most influential minds. Throughout his career, Wolfe tackled the human experiences, manners, and morals of a variety of areas within American culture. His 1979 book, The Right Stuff, captures the bravery and resolve of post-war military test pilots during the beginnings of NASA’s push into outer space. His satirical 1987 novel, The Bonfire of The Vanities, tackled all the vastly varying, endlessly interlocking storylines that make up New York City. From Wall Street suits to Grand Concourse street criminals and everyone in between, Wolfe’s examination of the ripples that emanate from a racially tinged hit-and-run in the Bronx deftly echoed the city’s all-too-real societal ills, despite being a work of fiction. The list goes on and on…Wolfe was a pioneer of “New Journalism,” the more narrative, novelistic style of reporting used by many of the celebrated writers of the 1960’s—a time of cultural revolution and reinvention in American unlike any the country had seen before. As Wolfe explained in his 1973 anthology, The New Journalism:The Sixties was one of the most extraordinary decades in American history in terms of manners and morals. Manners and morals were the history of the Sixties. … A hundred years from now when historians write about the 1960’s in America, they won’t write about it as the decade of war in Vietnam or of space exploration or of political assassinations…but as the decade when manners and morals, styles of living, attitudes toward the world changed the country more crucially than any political events.That notion was never more true than in one of Tom Wolfe’s earliest books, 1968’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. The work of nonfiction still stands today as one of the seminal examples of “New Journalism,” as well as one of the most thematically and descriptively accurate depictions of the burgeoning LSD culture in the mid-’60s.In the book, Tom Wolfe trails author, scholar, and West Coast psychedelic pioneer Ken Kesey and his band of Merry Pranksters as they begin the acid-oriented lifestyle that eventually made them idolized figures in the growing counterculture. Tom’s writing style fit this new lifestyle perfectly, making him ready and able to capture the interactions, emotions, and often fragile mental state of affairs that came along with it. Despite being fully engulfed in the movement and aligned with the Prankster’s philosophy, the book is still hailed for Wolfe’s ability to distinguish between the realities of the Pranksters and Kesey’s experiences and the emotions and actions triggered by their acid-fueled paranoia and disarray.[1965 Acid Test Flier]The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test chronicles the rise of LSD culture with Kesey and the Pranksters as its vessel, from the earliest acid parties thrown on his La Honda, California property to, eventually, the notorious “Acid Tests” for which the book is named. That is where they came in contact with The Grateful Dead, another rising psychedelic institution that truly cut their teeth as improvisational musicians playing at Kesey’s manic Acid Tests.Today, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test stands as one of the most important 60s’ counterculture texts, as it sees Tom Wolfe (now known for his unconventional and uniquely descriptive style of nonfiction reporting) using all his literary power to describe the experience of the Grateful Dead (which would become widely known simply for defying description)–well before either entity was a household name. You can check out several great Tom Wolfe passages about The Grateful Dead and the Acid Tests from The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test below:On The Grateful Dead’s Acid Test PerformancesThose who were … not on the bus … would come to the realization that there was no schedule. The Grateful Dead did not play in sets; no eight numbers to a set, then a twenty-five-minute break, and so on, four or five sets and then the close-out. The Dead might play one number for five minutes or thirty minutes. Who kept time? Who could keep time, with history cut up in slices. The Dead could get just as stoned as anyone else. The … non-attuned would look about and here would be all manner of heads, including those running the show, the Pranksters, stroked out against the walls like slices of Jello. Waiting; with nobody looking very likely to start it back up. Those who didn’t care to wait would tend to drift off, stoned or otherwise, and the test would settle down to the pudding.On The Origins Of Ken Kesey & Jerry Garcia’s RelationshipKesey had hooked up with a rock ‘n’ roll band, The Grateful Dead, led by Jerry Garcia, the same dead-end kid who used to live in the Chateau in Palo Alto … and you had to throw them out when they came over and tried to crash the parties on Perry Lane. Garcia remembered—how they came down and used to get booted out “by Kesey and the wine drinkers.” The wine drinkers—the middle-class bohemians of Perry Lane. They both, Kesey and Garcia, had been heading into the pudding, from different directions, all that time, and now Garcia was a, yes, beautiful person, quiet, into the pudding, and a great guitar player. Garcia had first named his group The Warlocks, meaning sorcerers or wizards, and they had been eking by playing for the beer drinkers, at jazz joints and the like around Palo Alto. To the Warlocks, the beer drinker music, even when called jazz, was just square hip. They were on to that distinction, too. For Kesey–they could just play, do their thing.On Young Jerry Garcia Trying To Have A Real-Life Conversation At The Acid TestsGarcia, for his part, however, doesn’t know which bursts out first, the music or the orange laugh. Out the edges of his eyes he can see his own black hair framing his face—it is so long, to the shoulders, and springs out like a Sudanese soldier’s.On Owsley’s Acid & How The Dead And The Acid Tests Invented “Acid Rock”When the acid scene spread to England in late 1966 and 1967, the hippest intelligence one could pass around was that one was in possession of “Owsley acid.” In the acid world, this was bottled-in-bond; certified; guaranteed; and high status. It was in this head world that the … Beatles first took LSD. … Through The Dead’s experience with the Pranksters was born the sound known as “acid rock.” And it was that sound that the Beatles picked up on, after they started taking acid, to do a famous series of acid-rock record albums, Revolver, Rubber Soul, and Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.On The Influential Effects Of The Acid Tests & The Grateful Dead On Media Consumption“Mixed media” entertainment—this came straight out of the Acid Tests’ combination of light and movie projections, strobes, tapes, rock n’ roll, black light. “Acid rock”—the sound of the Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper album and the high-vibrato electronic sounds of the Jefferson Airplane, the Mothers of Invention and many other groups—the mothers of it all were the Grateful Dead at the Acid Tests. The Dead were the audio counterpart of Roy Seburn‘s light projections. Owsley was responsible for some of this, indirectly. Owsley had snapped back from his great Freakout and started pouring money into the Grateful Dead and, thereby, the Tests.Maybe he figured the Tests were the wave of the future… Maybe he thought “acid rock” was the sound of the future and he would become a kind of Brian Epstein for the Grateful Dead. I don’t know. In any case, he started buying the Dead equipment such as no rock n’ roll band ever had before, the Beatles included, all manner of tuners, amplifiers, receivers, loudspeakers, microphones, cartridges, tapes, theater horns, booms, lights, turntables, instruments, mixers, muters, servile mesochroics, whatever was on the market. The sound went down on so many microphones and hooked through so many mixers and variable lags and blew up in so many amplifiers and roiled around in so many speakers and fed back down so many microphones, it came on like a chemical refinery. There was something wholly new and deliriously weird in the Dead’s sound, and practically everything new in rock ‘n’ roll, rock jazz I have heard it called, came out of it.Rest in peace, Tom Wolfe. To purchase The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and read more about Tom Wolfe’s adventures with Ken Kesey, the Merry Pranksters, and the Grateful Dead, head here.last_img read more

first_imgStudent Senate debated the feasibility of streamlining student government by merging with the Council of Representatives (COR) at its meeting Wednesday. Oversight committee chair Ben Noe said the merger would make student government more effective by consolidating meetings and making the group more representative of the entire student body. “It would help cut down on the amount of necessary waste that goes into all the student government meetings,” Noe said. “It would also help those involved in COR who may not have a voice in the policy process. It would give them a voice and a vote.” Student body vice president Brett Rocheleau said the change would eliminate COR and add eight new voting members to Senate — the four class presidents, the off-campus president, the chair of the Student Union Board, the president of the Club Coordination Council and the Student Union treasurer. These extra voices would improve the dialogue at Student Senate meetings, student body president Pat McCormick said. “Wouldn’t it be cool to see if we could expand representativeness in the Senate to really get Senate to be more of a deliberative body, to include the class perspectives and other perspectives?” he said. McCormick said the committee chair updates, which typically occur during the first 20 minutes of Senate, would be eliminated from the meetings in order for the group to focus more on addressing student body issues. “There is going to be a little bit more clarity at meetings,” he said. “This will really be the time for us to discuss the issues of the day for the student body.” The fusion would also offer students, especially those living off campus, better representation in the policy branch of student government, McCormick said. “[Off-campus senator] Helen Costa represents 1500 students, while each other senator represents approximately 300,” McCormick said. “Even though we have the halls covered in Senate, we really don’t have off-campus students covered.” The additions of the off-campus president and the senior class president would ensure the needs of off-campus students receive greater attention. Keough senator Andrew Anderson questioned whether it would be fair to give voting powers to some of the suggested additional members, as a number of them are appointed rather than elected. While officers such as the Student Union treasurer are not elected, McCormick said they could still bring valuable viewpoints to Senate. “The idea would be that in having them here, they would be able to provide the perspectives of the other important branches of the Student Union,” he said. Rocheleau said that though representation is a concern, the merger is primarily aimed at improving effectiveness. “While representation is a question, it isn’t the main focus of the fusion,” he said. “The fusion is trying to be more effective and have better meetings than we currently have in the two separate meetings.” Walsh senator Elizabeth Owers, who also sits on COR, said the change would remove the great deal of overlap experienced by students who attend more than one meeting per week. “Anything that’s not discussed at COR, it’s discussed at Senate, then we get those updates at Hall Council too,” she said. “Plus if you’re sitting in three meetings a week, each one might not feel so important. But if you’re down to one, it makes it feel really important.”last_img read more

first_img Cori ‘Coco’ Gauff: Wimbledon support felt like playing in New York The 11th-seeded Williams passed a huge test to move a step closer to matching Margaret Court’s tally of 24 Grand Slam singles titles, setting up a showdown with Barbora Strycova or Johanna Konta.Riske had lost one of 14 grass-court matches this year and pushed her esteemed compatriot all the way before an 18th Williams ace ended a thrilling contest. Related News Last-year’s runner-up struck 48 winners in an absorbing match against the attacking Riske and will put her fitness levels to the test by returning for mixed doubles action with Andy Murray later in the day.A big victory deserves a big celebration…#Wimbledon | @serenawilliams pic.twitter.com/w4iAoilKbm— Wimbledon (@Wimbledon) July 9, 2019Fired-up Pittsburgh native Riske beat top seed Ashleigh Barty to reach the quarterfinals and was clearly not overawed as she took a 3-1 lead, but Williams was level at 3-3.Riske took that setback on the chin, breaking with a searing backhand return but again failing to consolidate and the seven-time champion found another gear to win three games in a row and claim the opening set.A cushioned Williams backhand volley had Riske scurrying in vain during the first game of the second set, the veteran also firing down two booming aces to hold.Riske continued to come forward at every opportunity and broke to lead 5-4 with a majestic half-volley, then served out the set to love with no hint of nerves. Wimbledon 2019: Cori ‘Coco’ Gauff’s fairytale halted by Simona Halepcenter_img The underdog conjured up another winner to start the final set with a break after Williams had her ankle taped, but the former world No. 1 hit straight back, a rasping forehand return making it 1-1.Williams applied the pressure and a fourth double fault from Riske left her 3-1 down, but back came the world No. 55 to get back on serve following a couple of huge returns.Yet she was shaking her head after Williams showed great anticipation to get her nose in front at 5-3, before serving out the match to end Riske’s best major run. WIMBLEDON, England — Serena Williams fended off inspired fellow American Alison Riske in a fierce battle to reach a 12th Wimbledon semifinal on Tuesday.The unseeded Riske declared she was “ready for war” in her first Grand Slam quarterfinal and kept to her word on Centre Court before finally going down 6-4, 4-6, 6-3.last_img read more

first_imgWith the local aviation sector poised to undergo expansive development in the coming years, the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) is preparing for that ‘tsunami’ with the construction of a state-of-the-art head office at Providence, East Bank Demerara.Director General Egbert Field (centre) with Public Infrastructure Ministers David Patterson and Jaipaul Sharma turning the sod for the new GCAA headquarters at ProvidenceThe new GCAA complex will be constructed behind the Guyana National Stadium to the tune of some $1.2 billion.At the sod-turning ceremony on Friday, GCAA Director General Retired Lieutenant Colonel Egbert Field explained that this new building will be constructed to cater for what’s to come in Guyana. He noted that the complex will feature a gymnasium, nursery, and cafeteria, better offices for all departments, a conference room, and possibly a training centre.“Guyana is moving swiftly ahead. The waves of the tsunami are now lapping on the shores and if we are not ready, we will definitely be swamped,” GCAA Head stated.Field went on to highlight the many achievements in the aviation sector, but recognised that much more needs to be done.“The work must continue and this new headquarters that we are about to embark on, in terms of its building and construction, is a very important item which will see Guyana move into future as we continue our progress,” he posited.Currently, GCAA is renting two buildings at High Street, Kingston, Georgetown for $42 million annually.“It’s not a sustainable model for an institution such as GCAA or any Government institution renting. There is no permanency in it and you can’t plan and develop as you like,” Public Infrastructure Minister David Patterson said.Junior Infrastructure Minister Jaipaul Sharma disclosed that with the GCAA always having to move around to various rentals, huge sums of monies were expended— including $25 million to maintain Colgrain House which it used to occupy. He added that apart from the high rental rate for the current property the Authority is occupying, a three-year caveat was imposed on the GCAA and this is the reason behind the Authority “aggressively” pursuing its own space.His senior, Minister Patterson, acknowledged that the new GCAA headquarters is being established at a time when there is a “vast shift” in the aviation sector with its responsibilities expanding into dimensions never seen before here. To this end, he urged the GCAA to gear up for what’s to come.Friday’s sod-turning was done on the 10 acres plot of land, which was procured at the cost of $25 million, and was witnessed by GCAA Chairman Larry London and other Board members as well as former Junior Infrastructure Minister Annette Ferguson, among other officials.Construction for the $1.2 billion complex is expected to last for 18 months; however, the GCAA Head told reporters that they are yet to secure funding for the project. Chinese Ambassador Cui Jianchun, who was also at the event, informally indicated that his country can put up some of the funding.Nevertheless, the project is currently in the tendering process before the National Procurement and Tender Administration Board (NPTAB). According to Field, he is hoping that construction starts later this year since the rental contract for the building which the GCAA occupies will expire in 2021.last_img read more