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first_imgTech giant Apple is currently in talks with streaming service TIDAL to acquire the platform and use it to bolster their own service, Apple Music, according to sources close to the matter. Although negotiations are still underway, and confirmation and terms of the deal are still unconfirmed, Apple’s streaming efforts would surely stand to benefit from TIDAL’s exclusive relationships with various high-profile artists like Kanye West and Madonna. The issue of artist royalties from streaming has become more and more pertinent in recent years as the record industry has shifted away from purchased digital and physical units and toward a more streaming-based model. With declining record sales, artists now have to make the majority of their money from touring, and many feel that this may have an overall negative effect on the quality and quantity of new music that new artists are able to bring to fruition. Hip Hop mogul Jay Z purchased TIDAL in March of 2015 for $56 million in an attempt to route a larger portion of the proceeds from music streaming to the artists rather than large corporations.As Jay Z said in an interview with Billboard following the purchase, “For someone like me, I can go on tour, but what about the people working on the record, the content creators and not just the artists? If they’re not being compensated properly, then I think we’ll lose some writers and producers and people like that who depend on fair trade. Some would probably have to take another job, and I think we’ll lose some great writers in the process.” Jay sold equity stakes in the company to nearly twenty other artists, marketing the endeavor as the first artist-owned streaming service and offering perks like exclusive releases for paying subscribers. The infographic below, via Information Is Beautiful, which shows the disparities between artist payouts for streaming between the various competing services, illustrates Hov’s noble intentions in purchasing TIDAL:However, Jay’s big plans for TIDAL have not gone as well as expected. A year after the purchase, TIDAL’s subscription numbers are well below expectations, still trailing Apple and Spotify‘s services by considerable margins, leading to a smaller net payout for artists via TIDAL despite their higher per-stream rates. Furthermore, a handful of artists have brought legal action against the company for problems with payment. Earlier this year, John Emanuele from the band The American Dollar filed a class-action suit claiming that TIDAL has yet to compensate the band for any of the royalty payments accrued from the streaming of the band’s 116 copyrighted songs on the platform. This has prompted Jay Z and Tidal to mount a concurrent suit against the company that sold them the service last year, saying that the user numbers they presented were fraudulent.Despite publicly remaining behind his venture, Jay Z has been shopping the company around to big tech companies for months, having reportedly taken meetings with Facebook and Samsung as well. While it is unclear how Apple would incorporate TIDAL’s current structure into their own efforts, if Apple does end up purchasing the company, the already-competitive streaming industry will become an even smaller club, consolidating more power with fewer large corporations and making it harder and harder for artists to change the status quo, as Jay and his partners originally sought to do with TIDAL.last_img read more

first_imgHarvard College announced today (Feb. 24) that it will restore nonbinding early action as part of its admissions process this fall and significantly enhance its recruiting program to assist talented students from modest economic backgrounds in navigating the admissions process. Harvard also announced it will increase its investment in undergraduate financial aid next year to more than $160 million. Currently, more than 60 percent of Harvard College students receive scholarship aid, and the average grant is about $38,000.In 2007, Harvard eliminated its nonbinding early action program on a trial basis and moved to a single admissions deadline, announcing at the time that it would evaluate the impact of the change after several years.“We piloted the elimination of early action out of concern that college admissions had become too complex and pressured for all students, and out of particular concern for students at under-resourced high schools who might not be able to access the early admissions process,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “Over the past several years, however, interest in early admissions has increased, as students and families from across the economic spectrum seek certainty about college choices and financing. Our goal now is to reinstitute an early-action program consistent with our bedrock commitment to access, affordability, and excellence.”“We looked carefully at trends in Harvard admissions these past years and saw that many highly talented students, including some of the best-prepared low-income and underrepresented minority students, were choosing programs with an early-action option, and therefore were missing out on the opportunity to consider Harvard. We have decided that the College and our students will be best served by restoring an early option,” said Dean Michael D. Smith of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Harvard’s concerns about equity and transparency will continue to guide the structure of its admission program. It will maintain a nonbinding approach, which maximizes freedom and flexibility for students. As in the past, students can apply under the single-choice, early-action program by Nov. 1 and will be notified by Dec. 15, at which point students completing financial aid applications will receive notice of their awards. Regular decision will continue to operate as usual, with applications due on Jan. 1 and notification on April 1. All students, whether admitted under early action or regular decision, will have until May 1 to decide whether to attend.To ensure that the return to early action serves Harvard’s commitment to access and diversity across many dimensions, the change in admissions policy will be accompanied by enhancements in the College’s recruiting program, including a new program promoting transparency in college admissions, greater outreach, and targeted staff visits to schools where few students apply early to college; increased involvement of Harvard undergraduates throughout the year in three major recruiting efforts — the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative, the Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program, and the Undergraduate Admissions Council’s Return to High School Program; and enhanced web features providing families with the ability to calculate the likely net cost to them of sending a child to Harvard, and perspectives from financial aid students on life at Harvard.“The commitment to including first-generation, low-income, and historically disadvantaged minority students in the full spectrum of admissions options is a key feature of this new early-action option,” said Harvard College Dean Evelynn Hammonds. “We have made significant gains in recent years in recruiting larger numbers of these students and in supporting them for success once here. I am very pleased that we are able to re-conceive early action, consistent with these goals, and to work with students based on whatever timetable best meets their needs.”“We continue to be concerned about the pressures on students today, including those associated with college admission,” said Harvard College Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons. “In all of our work, we will do everything possible to level the playing field in admissions and encourage all students to make thoughtful choices about how they can best contribute to society.”last_img read more

first_imgSenior golfer Bobby Gojuangco was chosen to play in the Northern Trust Open Collegiate Showcase held Monday at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades. He shot a 5-over-par 76, playing a difficult course set up for the professional tournament.The event was set up so that 14 college golfers were paired with 14 PGA Tour professionals who are alumni of their respective  colleges. In addition, each group also contained two other alumni from the school, generally athletic donors. The talented collegiate field included Charlie Danielson of the University of Illinois, the fourth-ranked college golfer nationally and the event’s winner with a round of 68, as well as the University of Texas’ Beau Hossler, the third-ranked college golfer in his freshman year, who briefly held the lead at the 2012 U.S. Open at the age of 17. With his victory, Danielson earned an entry into the main tournament this weekend.Playing professionally were stars such as the top-ranked golfer in the world Jordan Spieth, and top-30 players J.B. Holmes, Jimmy Walker and Paul Casey. Gojuangco was paired with Trojan alumnus Jamie Lovemark, who is coming off a difficult 2015, but his year was highlighted by a top-20 finish in the U.S. Open.The PGA professionals along with two other alumni from each university also competed in a best ball tournament where the winners earned a $50,000 contribution to the school’s golf team. The University of Texas, led by Spieth, captured that aspect of the tournament to earn the generous prize.Gojuangco will return to the seventh-ranked USC golf team who are hoping to build on their successes this season, winning the Amer Ari Invitational last weekend, and coming off of a runner-up finish in the match play championship last season.The Northern Trust Open begins this Thursday and runs through the weekend and features some of the world’s top golfers including Spieth, Bubba Watson and Rory McIlroy.last_img read more