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first_imgEarlier in the year, The Peach Music Festival dropped the highly anticipated lineup for its 2018 edition, which will take place at Montage Mountain in Scranton, Pennsylvania, from July 19th through 22nd (almost a full month earlier than it has in previous years). At the time of the original announcement, the festival revealed that it would host Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band, two sets of Gov’t Mule (including a “Dark Side of the Mule” set), two sets of Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, the return of Dickey Betts and his band (marking the Allman Brothers Band original member’s first announced show since ending his retirement), two sets of moe., the annual “Wake Up with Warren Haynes”, two sets of Twiddle including “Twiddle & Friends”, the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Blackberry Smoke, and many moreFamily And Friends Of The Allman Brothers Reunite At Peach Fest For Gregg & Butch Tribute [Audio]Today, The Peach Music Festival added to their already enviable list of headlining performers, announcing that now Umphrey’s McGee has joined the ranks of acts who will perform at the event. In addition to this truly impressive list of headliners, the festival has also tapped Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Turkuaz, Spafford, The Marcus King Band, Leftover Salmon, Dumpstaphunk, Anders Osborne & Jackie Greene, Nicki Bluhm, Aqueous, BIG Something, Ghost Light (featuring Tom Hamilton & Holly Bowling), and The Main Squeeze to appear during the event. The impressive lineup is rounded out by Brandon “Taz” Niederauer Band, Organ Freeman, Driftwood, The Magic Beans, Midnight North, Litz, Mo Lowda & The Humble, The Blue Stones, Soule Monde, Gatos Blancos, Flux Capacitor, JP Biondo, Bobby Lee Rodgers, Bishop Gunn, Funky Dawgz Brass Band, and Juice.Check out an updated lineup card for The Peach Music Festival below, and head to the Peach Fest website for more details and tickets.[Photo: Phierce Photo]last_img read more

first_imgMost parents plan on seeing their child’s teacher only a few times a year at parent-teacher conferences. But building a relationship with your child’s teacher can improve your child’s performance during the school year. Parents who have a working relationship with their children’s teachers can tackle problems with the child’s academic performance or behavior earlier and more effectively. “That relationship with a teacher is important, especially when a child is young,” said Diane Bales, a child development specialist with the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “The teachers are sometimes the first people to see when a child is having difficulty and can alert parents to any problems.” One key to building an open conversation with your child’s teacher is to start talking at the beginning of the school year before any problems arise. When a teacher has to tell a child’s parent that their child is misbehaving or falling behind, tensions can run high. That’s not the best time to start a relationship with your child’s teacher. “Don’t wait until something goes wrong to talk to your child’s teacher,” Bales said. She suggests meeting the teacher in person at the beginning of the year and then touching base regularly through a quick email or with a phone call. If you feel your child is facing a hurdle in class or you have other serious concerns, set up an appointment to meet with the teacher. You don’t have to wait for the parent-teacher conference at the end of the grading period to have a conversation about your child. When parent-teacher conference time does come around, make the most of it. Write down any questions or concerns you want to address and use that to guide the conversation. Be prepared to share information about any life changes that you or your child are going through during the school year — a move, a new sibling or a change in parents’ relationship can impact a child’s classroom performance. “You don’t have to tell your whole life story, but give the basics about why your child might be upset so the teacher knows what’s going on,” Bales said. Above all, don’t be defensive if your child’s teacher reaches out to you about a behavior problem or your child’s difficulties in class. Teachers sometimes have insight into children’s behaviors and academic performance that parents don’t. They also can help find your child the extra help or interventions they need to get back on track. “A parent is the expert on their child, but teachers know, on average, what children are like and may spot problems before parents,” Bales said. “Parents may not notice that something is unusual; they are not around as many different children as teachers.”last_img read more